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■/ "7. O 




VOL.. XLVI. No. 1. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 7, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A YEAR 




MONTE CARLO 2:07 1-4 

Bay Gelding by Mendocino, dam by Tilton Almont 




2 



I January 7, 190") 



THE MILLER CART 



Handsomest, 
Best Finished, 
Easiest Riding 

CART in the Market. 

Drawn by the Star Horses 

USED' BY THOUSANDS 

For Sale by JOHN I, SPARROW, Coast Agent, at 3156 Mission St., S, F. 

49- Write for Booklet. 

Also Agent for THE FAMOUS DECKER SULKY. 29 to 35 lbs. 

Budd Doble says: "I like it better than any sulky I ever sat in, and It is formed on the best 

mechanical ideas. 





THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 



WALTER SEALY, Manager. 



HAL B. 2:04 



The Only High-Class "Hal" Stallion 
the Pacific Coast 



on 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 



GALL CURE 

For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPE 
SORES and SADDLE CALLS there is nou 

superior. 

The horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 
For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISONED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It is very adhesive and easily applied to a watery 
as well as a dry sore. 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON 
INO. In this respect there is no Qall Cure offered 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the salesof 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to 1(8 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saying that 
it is THE GALL CURE OF THE 30TH CENTURY. 

It is a quiok and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe ->ck w nich Injure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 

PRICE:— 3 OZ. BOX, Z5o.; 1 LB. BOX, SI. OO. 

Read our "ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this paper. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write anyjobberfor it 



HAL B. 2:04V4 was the sensation of the Grand Circuit in 1899, in which he started nine times, 
winning all bis raoes He was the largest money winner of that season. HAL B. is full brother to 
Fanny Dillard 2:03;i, world's race record for pacing mares. Atllyearsof age he is the sireof four 
in the list. HAL B. is by Hal Dillard 2:04« (sire of Fanny Dillard 2:03V, Hal B. 2:04*. Hal Clipper 
2:07!4, Cambina Maid 2:08<4, Young Hal 2:10!4. Halite Rackett 2:11, trotting etc.), dam Ella (dam of 
Fanny Dillard 2:03?.£ and Hal B. 2:04'/,) by Blue Boy, son of Blue Bull 75; second dam by Blue Bull 75. 

HAL B is a handsome dark bay or brown stallion, stands 15.3 hands and Is an ideal horse in 
every partioular. Remember this is your opportunity at home to breed to a distinguished represent- 
ative of the great Tennessee pacing family, "The Hals." 

Season at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until April 15, 1905, 

All correspondence concerning HAL B. while on this Coast should be addressed to 



Terms, $50 Cash. 



Money refunded if mare proves not with foal. 
D. H. MAST, Owner, West Milton, Ohio. 



OMER VAN KIRK, 
University P. O , Los Angeles, Cal. 

Reference: West Milton Bank. 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, Oy the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




RED BALL BRAND. 



Awarded Gold Meda 
At CalifornlaState 
Fair 1892. 

Every horseowner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
improves and keeps 
stock in the pink of 
condition. 

Manhattan Pood Co 

1253 Folgom St., San Francisco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 



Positivelv Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KERTELL. Manager 



SINGMASTER &SONS,of Keota Iowa, 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OK 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

127 St. John Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class stock always on hand. It will pay to call and inspect stock if you are in need of a 
good stallion C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager 




Hard Times Made Easy 

For the owner of horses by the use of the old, reliable, often imitated but 
never equaled— CRAFT'S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE It saves a 
*2m horse or any other horse from death or disability. It cures and prevents 
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and Colds. Best known remedy for Heaves Sold at all reputable druggists 
or direct on receipt of price: $1 a bottle— small size 50c— or $4.50 a dozen. 

Send for free booklet. 



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jrermologlatg 



13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind, 



Advertise Your Stallion for 

Season of 1905 



SAVE-TH E-HO RS E" SPAVIN CURE 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK 



2 and 2 make 4!! You Can't Controvert Facts! 

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Letters from bankers, prominent business 
men. trainers, aod breeders the world over, 
telling of actual experience in every known 
condition. Absolute certainties In them- 
selves. Send for them with booklet 



A Guarantee equivalent to a bond construct- 
ed to make it legally binding to protect you. 
A practical, comprehensive and valuable 
booklet on all diseases and injuries causii g 
lameness. Send for them. 



AS THEY 
SOMETIMES 
ARE 



FROM THE CONSERVATIVE TRAINER OF VILLAGE FARM 

Who showed Beau Ideal at the National Horse show at Madlsou Square 
Garden this Fall and won the Blue Klbbon In the 
Champion Stallion Clan says: 

Village Farm, East Aurora. N. Y., November 21. 1901. 
Millard Sanders at Memphis. Tenn , recommended "Save-the Horse" to me 
three years ago I used it on a bad tendon on which I had used about every known 
treatment without result. After two weeks treatment with "Save-the-Horse" I 
could see Improvement and from then on the horse went sound and has never 
taken a lame step since. I also used it on Thoroughplns and Wind puffs and found 
it worked equally as well as it cleaned the enlargements off entrrely and tbey 
have never come back I have used every known blister and the fire Iron, but 
have never had anything to compare with "Save-the-Horse " I buy It from 
Becker & Wickserof Buffalo and of Bruce & Co. of Memphis. Teon., in half dozen 
lots. I will never be without it. BENJ. F. WHITE. 

The Tontine Boarding and Livery Stables, 
860 Eighth Ave., New York. Nov 20. 191% 
I bad a nine-year-old stallion lame over a year. Ho was not worth $10. I used 
your "Save the-Horse" and he has gone sound ever since. I have driven him 
twenty-five miles in one day and would not now take $250 for the animal. * 

WILLIAM MILLER. 

Frawklin Park, Saugus, Mass., November 21, 1904. 
I have used "Save-the-Horse" on bad legs, splints, big knee and on bunches with perfect success 
in every case. Have used it on many horses for many conditions. It has never failed. I would sug- 
gest that you write to Ray Werner of Coldwater, Mich , who was one of the first to tell me of the 
great sucoess obtained with your remedy F. P. FOX. 

"SAVE-THE-HORSE" PERMANENTLY CURES BONE AND BOG SPAVIN, THOROUGH- 
PIN, RINGBONE (except low ringbone). CURB, SPLINT, CAPPED HOCK, WINPPU1%\ SHOE 
BOIL, WEAK AND SPRAINED TENDONS AND ALL LAMENESS. Apply in all extremes of 
weather. Cures without scar or loss of hair Horses may work as usual. 

$5 OO per bottle. Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bottle improbable, 
except in rarost cases. •5.00 at druggists and dealers or sent express paid by 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, Manufacturers. BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK 

O. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 




mm 




fake II lii 

\, If you have the remedy on band, and are ready to 
act promptly, you will find that there is nothing in 
the form of Spavins, Splints, Curbs. Windpuffs and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly und pern i a- 

! nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 



It has saved thousands of (rood horses from the peddler's 
cart and the broken-down horse market. Mr. C It ldck- 
apolls. Minn., v, h<> conducts one of the largest livery stables In the N"i thWMt, 
..Hows: I have been lifting Quinn't Ointment for some time and with the VTOatMl 
I take pleasure in recommending it to my friends. No horseman should be ^ it h 
a stable. For curbs, splints. Rpavins. uindpulfs and all bunches It has no equal" 
1.00 por bottle Sold by all druggists or sent by mail. Write us for circulars, 

W- B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 




0AKW00DS STOCK FARM 



PERCHERON, 
BELGIAN and 
COACH 
STALLIONS 



California's Largest Importing and Breeding Establishment. 

High-class Stock always on hand. Goad terms. Moderate prices. Libera) guarantee Visitors 
always welcome. Address all correspondence to 

OAKWOODS STOCK FARM, FRANCIS I. HODGKIKS, Prop., STOCKTON. C\L' 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for ffamiDp 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 7. 1905] 



134239 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific oast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Terms— One Year »3. Six Months SI. 75, Three Months 81 
STRICTLY IN ADVANUK 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kellet, 38 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by tbe writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 7, 1905 

SEVENTY-FIVE THREE-YEAR-OLDS are paid 
up on and eligible to Breeders Futurity No. 2, 
the three-year-old trotting and pacing divisions of 
which are to be decided this year at the meeting of 
the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Associa- 
tion. This makes the value of the becond stake much 
more than the first one and instead of the three-year- 
olds trotting and pacing for $2000 and $1000 as they 
did last year the amounts will be nearer $2700 for 
trotters and $1300 for pacers. No stake ever inaugu- 
rated on the Pacific Coast has been so popular with 
breeders as this one and the fact that the stake money 
is deposited by Treasurer N. T. Smith in reputable 
savings banks, where it draws interest until the time 
of the races, gives the stake a standing among horse- 
men of the Pacific Coast which no other stake has. 
The fact that the sixth payment was made January 
2d on seventy-five three-year-olds eligible to Breeders 
Futurity No 2 means that there will be seventy-five 
three-year-olds in training by another month for this 
stake and that fact alone is worth mentioning. The 
harness horse industry in California is in a very 
healthy condition, despite the fact that our circuit in 
the past few years has been a small one. Trainers 
and owners are finding that there is money in train- 
ing and fitting horses to sell, and that while there are 
not many meetings in California those held are well 
patronized and the racing clean and good. If there 
could be a circuit arranged this year of seven or eight 
good meetings it would be sufficient to give all who 
have horses in training a chance to race. The fact 
that seventy-five three-year-olds have been paid up 
on for one stake shows that the horseimn are ready 
to do their part toward making a successful circuit. 
All that is needed now is for the associations to get 
together and form one, and announce dates and 
purses. It should be done at once. 



THE- COMPARISONS which Editor Hervey of the 
Chicago Horse Review has been making in that 
excellent journal recently between trottirg and run- 
ning meetings have aroused the antagonisms of many 
of his contemporaries who want to see "running 
methods' ' introduced in the trotting meetings. Editor 
Hervey, however, has to our mind much the better 
of the arguments and his page editoral in the edition 
of December 27th shows the conditions on the running 
tracks as they exist in nearly all the principal cities 
of the United States where running meetings are 
held. Racing is not a sport on the running tracks of 
America, but a business. The old plan of holding 
meetings for the pleasure of the sport has been 
abolished. Jockey Clubs are now formed for profit, 
and unless the meetings pay dividends to the stock- 
holders they are discontinued. There is not a ruuning 
association in America that could continue a meeting 
over two weeks in the interest of true sport. We 
hope that running methods will never be adopted on 
the trottings tracks, as they would kill the sport to a 
moral certainty. The Horse Review is correct in its 
opposition to the adoption of the methods which 
have made the running tracks famous. More power 
to the pen of its editor in the good work ho is doing. 



yHE NEW SPEED TRACK and athletic grounds 
' in Golden Gate Park will bo finished within a 
year. The $20,000 raised by contribution of the 
horsemen and people interested in athletics in San 
Francisco has been turned over to the Park Com- 
missioners, who will expend a like amount on the 
work which has already begun. It is expected that 
the new grounds will be finished within a year, and 
ready for use. The track will be a regulation oval, 
sixty feet in width and the infield will be fitted for 
polo, football and other sports, while a bicycle course 



will be laid out inside the trotting track. The horse- 
men of San Francisco are greatly pleased over the 
outlook as the new track is certain to be one of the 
most popular recreation grounds in the iity . 



A CALIFORNIA CIRCUIT of harness racing 
should be organized immediately without any 
reference to what course the Legislature will take in 
regard to district fairs. Santa Rosa, San Jose, Pieas- 
atiton, Woodland, Stockton and Fresno could form a 
circuit that would d raw all the best trotters and pacers 
in California. If such a circuit could be formed imme- 
diately and programs announced, big entry lists would 
be received. All the horsemen want to race in Cali- 
fornia this year, but they don't want to wait three or 
four months to know where the meetings will be held. 



IN ANSWER to a correspondent we will state that 
' the fastest record for one-quarter mile running is 
21J seconds, held by Bob Wade, a four-year-old, and 
made at Butte Montana, August 20, 1890. 



Breeders Futurity of 1905. 

Stake No 2, S60OO, for Mares Bred In 1901. 

Sixth pay ments of $10 each were made January 2, 
1905, by the following nominators on foals of mares 
bred in 1901: 

Bohon Jos H, ch c Bolock by Zolock, dam Boellen. 

Barstow, T W, b f Just It by Nearest, dam Babe. 

Bemmerly, Sam, b f by Diablo, dam Bell Button. 

Borden, I L, bl f Roberta by Robert I, dam Allie 
Cresco; ch c Prince Robert by Robert I, dam Alice 
Belle. 

Brown, Arthur A, b f Jessie Shirley by Nushagak, 
dam Hattie W. 

Brown, Alex, b c El Rey by Nushagak, dam Pioche. 

Comisto, S b f Alice C by Monterey, dam Hazel. 

Christopher, L J, b f Direct Maid by Direcho, dam 
Ida Direct. 

Cone, D S, b c by Kinney Lou, dam Kitty Marviu. 

Carter, Martin, b c Lord Alwin by Nutwood Wilkes^ 
dam Ingar; b f Elma S by Nutwood Wilkes dam 
Bessie C. 

Crowley, T J, b c Pemberton by Boydello, dam 
Lottie Parks. 

Cuicello, J G, blk g by Rey Direct, dam Babe MarioD. 

Davies, Ben, b f Delilah by Zolock, dam Gipsy. 

Dolan. Sam'l M P, b c Zadok b* 7 Zombro, dam 
Maisie. 

Durfee, W G, b f Bellemont by Zombro, dam Daisy 
Q Hill; br f by Coronado, dam Lola. 

Dolan, Saml M P, b c Zadok by Zombro, dan Maisie. 

Erlanger, Edward, b c by Strathway, dam Fly. 

Failmann, FJ.bc Sir Robert by Nushagak, dam 
Hilda Rose. 

Faris Stock Farm, b f Monabella Benton by Mon- 
bells, dam Nellie Bentor. 

Foley, P, b f Lady Montesol by Montesol, dam Lady 
Bird. 

Griffith, C L, b f by Bonnie Direct, dam Petrina. 
Greene, W E, gr c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Little 
Witch. 

Hashagen, Wm, b c KUiney Rose by McKinney, 
dam Golden Rose. 

Hoy, S H, s c Ben Hoy by Capt Jones, dam Camilla. 

Heald, E P, b c by Nutwood Wilkes, dam Princess 
Mckinney. 

Haile, J W & Co, br c Raineer by Demonio, dam 
Corolla; b f Mamonio by Demonio, dam May Norriss. 

Harkey, W S b f Devilita by Diablo, dam Clara H. 

Hogoboom, Robert, b c Wald stein McKinney by 
Wash McKinney, dam Yolo Belle. 

Iverson, J B, b c North Star by Nutwood Wilkes, 
dam Ivoneer;chc Derby Chief by Chas Derby, dam 
Ruby. 

Kavanagh, Ed, ch c Staysail by Gaff Topsail, dam 
Dolican. 

King, C E, b f Azolia by Diawood, dam Dolly G. 
Kingsbury, Geo W, b f Delia K by Silver Bow, dam 
Elma. 

Keefer, M C, blk c Rankinwater by Bayswater 
Wilkes, dam Bessie Rankin. 

Lasell, L M, e c Bill Bow by Silver Bow, dam Belle 
Caprice. 

Lumsden, W H, br f by Bonnie Direct, dam Myrtle; 
br f by Bonnie Direct, dam Roblet. 

McAleer, Owen, b f Reela Newo by McKinney. dam 
Eva Wilkes. 

Marshall, J W, b f Mona Wilkes by Demonio, dam 
Trix. 

Masoero, Dr C, b f Tina by McKinney, dam La 
Moscovita. 

Montgomery, J C, ch f Lady Caretta by Nutwood 
Wilkes, dam Abbie Woodnut. 

Morgan, Wm, b or blk c Kaiser by Neernut, dam 
Grace McK; b c Una Boy by Neernut, dam Una K; br 
c Signet by Newton Direct, dam Nellie K. 

Mosher, I C, b c Oosoola by Zombro, dam Athalene; 



b f Gluck by Zombro, dam Scappoos. 

Mastin, W, b c Uncle Ben by Falrose, dam Moocev 
Filly. 

Mowry, Jos C, b f by McKinney, dam Electress 
Wilkes. 

Raschen, Fred, b f by Iran Alto, dam Bell Bird. 

Rankin, Wm B, b f McKinney Belle by McKinney, 
dam by Antinous. 

Reed, A L, br c Joe Reed by McKinney, dam 
Catinka. 

Rose Dale Stock Farm, b c by Wash. McKinney, 
dam Dalia; b c by Wash. McKinney, dam Darion. 

Runyon, Mrs Sol, be Roy Runyon by Mendocino, 
dam Coressa; b c Live Oak Runyon by Exioneer, dam 
Dextress. 

Shippee. W A, s f by Temescal, dam Trusswood. 

Smith, Thos, b f by McKinney.. dam Daisy S. 

Solano, Alfred, b f Novia Mia by Sky Pointer Jr, 
dam Nashawena. 

Strong, N M, br c Ambush by Zolock, dam May 
Kinney. 

Todhunter, L H, br f Zombelle by Zombro, dam 
Silver Bell; b f Zomitella by Zombro, dam Itella. 

Thompson, J W, ch f Miss Monbells by Monbells, 
dam Emaline. 

Trefry, S K, blk c Kenneth C by McKinney, dam 
Highland Maid. 

Valencia Stock Farm, br f La Belle Harriett by 
Darby Heir, dam La Belle; b f by Direct Heir, dam 
Rosed rop. 

Vance, W L, b c Sir John S by Diablo, dam Elisa S 

Vendome Stock Farm, b f Still Better by Iran Alto! 
dam Much Better. 

Warlow, Geo L, b c Athasham by Athadon, dam 
Cora Wickersham 

White, C F, blk f Marguerite W by Exioneer, dam 
Lillie Thorne. 

Wilson. A G,b c Little Medium by Dictatus Medium 
dam Little One. 

Wihon, J K, b f Easter Lily by Sidney Dillon, dam 
Lilly Stanley. 

Young, John D, br c Glen Alto by Rex Gifford, dam 
Glennita 

Pony Racing at San Mateo. 

Pony racing as conducted by the California Polo 
and Pony Racing Association at the private course of 
Chas. W. Clark at San Mateo, has become the most 
popular winter sport on the Coast. Owing to the wet 
weather of last week the program set for last Satur- 
day had to be postponed until Monday of this week, 
which was a legal holiday, and the grand stand and 
infield were thronged with a crowd that thoroughly 
enjoyed every event on the program. Five races were 
decided, Mr. Rudolph Spreckels' ponies winning 
three. Charles Dunphy had two winning mounts, R. 
J. Dunphy two and Frank Skinner one. Another ex- 
cellent program will be decided this afternoon. The 
results of last Monday's races were: 

Three-slxteentbs of a mile- 
Rudolph Spreckels' Don, 158 (Skinner) 1 

C. W. Clark's Silver Queen 131 (C Dunphy) 2 

C. W. Clark's Cakewalk, 145 (Clagstone) 3 

Queen Ruckerand Mary Aileen also ran. 

Time, 0:19H. 

Three-eighths of a mile- 
Rudolph Spreckels' Hopeful, 146 (R. J. Dunphy) 1 

C. W. Clark's Chanate, 152 (Clagstone) 3 

Rudolph Spreckels' Lady Gay, 151 (Skinner) 8 

Carlotta and Maudie Swift also ran. 

Time, 0:39. 

Quarter-mile— 

W. S Hobart's Silver Dick, 160 (C. Dunphy) 1 

Rudolph Spreckels' Becky, 155 (Skinner) 2 

W. S. Hobart's Marigold. 155 (Carolan) 3 

Queen Kucker, Cakewalk and Blthomer also ran. 

Time, 0:25'^. 

The Champion Stakes, six furlongs; — 

C. W. Clark's Bas Blancs, 150 (C. Dunphy) 1 

Rudolph Spreckels' Honoma, 150 (Skinner) 2 

C. W Clark s Morning Glory. 150 (R. M. Tobin) 3 

Lotrix also ran. 

Time by quarter?, 0:2S, 0:53, 1:24. 

Half-mile- 
Rudolph Spreckols' Cheerful, 140 (R. J. Dunpl y) 1 

W E. Pedley's Carlotta, 150 (C Dunphy) 2 

Rudolph Spreckels' Don, 153 (R. M. Tobin) 3 

Brown Peggy also ran. 

Time, 0:543£. 



John Lance, who has trained and driven many 
horses on the Northern Circuit, writes us from 
Cheney, Washington, under date of December ]4tb, 
that the weather up there had up to that date been 
like California weather, without a freeze. His horse 
Sam Howers 2:11, pacing, has taken to trotting, and 
has shown that he can trot in 2:15 or better, and will 
probably be raced through California next year if th» 
circuit is arranged so the northern hoi semen can get 
back to the North Pacific Circuit. Mr. Lance says he 
may be down here soon Besides his own subscription 
he sent that of Mr. lOugone Taj lor, of Pampa, Wash- 
ington, who he says is a new man in the harness horse 
business and a good one. 



The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms, private baths, telephone) 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 



Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it. 



4 



(Cue pvveocv cmi> &vvvx&man 



[January 7, 1905 



Seen on a Visit to Red Bluff. 

Breeder and Sportsman— HaviDg just returned 
from a visit to my former home, Red Bluff, after an 
absence of several years, I thought a few observations 
pertaining to the harness horse breeding interests o* 
that locality would probably be interesting to your 
readers. In the first place, it is a pleasure to be able 
to state that the business is in a most flourishing con- 
dition, and every horseman I met in Butte county an 
enthusiastic one, and of the kind that stay through 
good and bad report and at whose feet the poisoned 
arrows of malice and hatred, shot by the knockers, 
fall harmless. 

The Red Bluff track, as all horsemen know, is one 
of the best in the State. The District Agricultural 
Society has failed to hold a fair here for several years, 
and in consequence the grounds and track have been 
neglected and allowed to fall somewhat into decay, 
but thanks to the trotting horsemen here who came 
to the rescue of the track, it is now In first class con. 
dition and many horses are now being trained and 
worked over it. Those wide-awake and enterprising 
horsemen V. W. Frary. I. V. Andrews and "Prince 
L. -Kinney Lou Rowley" have the track in charge 
and their names are a guarantee that the grounds 
and the track will be kept in first class shape. Besides 
these gentlemen, there are R. Ramsey, Robert Free- 
man, Robert Burress, District Attorney Gill, Henry 
Witfeld, F. Coleman and several others whose names 
I cannot just now recall, who are enthusiastic owners 
or trainers of harness horses. 

Mr. Rowley is the man who trained and developed 
the great Kinney Lou until the stallion was sold to 
Badd Doble and who also trained Prince L. 2:17} and 
won three races within seven days with him at the 
State Fair of 1903. Mr. Rowley has four in training, 
all by the Doble horse. They all trot, favor their 
sire, and are very promising. 

F. Frary has in training one by Sidney Dillon that 
is entered in the Occident and Stanford Stakes, and 
will certainly stand for part of the money, barring 
bad luck. He has also a Kinney Lou yearling, dam 
by Dictatus, that is a fac simile of his sire and a very 
likely coU. He is the property of District Attorney 
Gill. 

J. V. Andrews has three that are all working fast. 
One is a chestnut gelding that he calls Pomp Morgan 
that is by Waldstein out of the dam of Prince L. 
This fellow has shown very fast work — I will not state 
just how fast, but money getting speed. He also has 
Miss Bessie by Gossiper, dam by Anteeo, a full sister 
to Lady Fair 2:17} that is the real thing, as she is 
much faster than her sister and will be a money 
winner Also King S. by Altamont, dam Queen S. 
that is warm goods. This youtig stallion, although 
only three and a half years old, was so well patronized 
that his owne-s hid to turn mares away last spring. 

There is also here the stallion Lorin, by Nazote 
(own brother to Azote 2:04ij), dam Lizette that was 
bred at Palo Alto. He is the property of F. W. 
Frary and well patronized. 

The good stallion Escort is owned by Henry Wit- 
feld. the leading blacksmith of the town and with no 
superior in the State Escort is doing and will do his 
full share. 

In this connection I wish to state that while these 
three stallions are the only harness stallions in this 
vicinity, T notice! there was an entire absence of that 
obnoxious despicable thing called knocking, and the 
result is that all these horses are doing a fine business, 
and good feeling and fellowship exists between the 
three owners. I sincerely hope that owners in other 
parts of the State will adopt this plan to the lasting 
benefit of this great industry. 

There are in this county many who are breediLg 
from one to a dozsn good mares each year, and nearly 
all the best stallions on the Coast are represented. 
The broodmares for instance on the Andrews place 
represent the blood of Anteeo, Altamont, William L. 
Almont 33, Gossiper, Vermont Blackbawk, Wald. 
stein, and George Wilkes, while on the Frary place 
Whips, Director, Escort, Sidney Dillon, and Steinway 
are represented and on tha D. Cone place McKinney, 
Don Marvin, Bay Bird, Kinney Lou, and others. 
These are but a few, the majority of the breedere 
here having only begun during the past few years, 
but they are all breeding along the best modern lines, 
and using up-to-date methods in development. I have 
no hesitation in predicting that in time this will be 
one of the best spe^d producing points in California, 
and in coneluaion iet me say that being a great 
admirei afld lover of the trotter and pacer my visit to 
Red Bluff has been an inspiration to me. 

Respectfully, A. G. ANDREWS, 
266 Second street, Oakland, Cal., Jan. 1, 1905. 

•P. H. McEvoy of Menlo Park is offering two band- 
some Princa Airlie stallions for sale— Milbrae (trot- 
ting record 2:16}) and Menlo Boy 3741. For particu- 
lars see advertisement. *tf 



Educating Trick Horses. 

When the German trick horse "Hans" created a 
sensation among lovers of horses by performing all 
kinds of tricks in the way of answering questions, 
counting, etc , it was claimed by his trainer that 
"H ins" performed entirely by virtue of his own brain 
and withoutany assistance from his trainer. Practical 
hers< men ridiculed the idea that a horse could add up 
sums, tell the time, etc , as they are well aware that 
horses reason "from causa to effect" and learn tricks 
as the result of what "has happened," not from what 
might or will happen. 

Every body has seen the circus horses answer the 
usualquestions "Yes" and "No" by bowing or shaking' 
their heads, and to the uninitiated it certainly looks 
very clever but it is really very simple. Incidentally, 
it may be mentioned that high-strung horses learn 
quicker than the quieter kind, and one that has a 
"cunning" streak in him is always an apt pupil. To 
teach the horse to say :'Yes" and "No" take a short 
stick, about two feet long, and drive a tack throughit 
at the end so the point sticks out just about a quarter 
of an inch. Standing on theleft-band side of the horse 
at his shoulder, ask him a question to which you want 
the answer "No" and then raise the stick so you can 
touch the horse on the crest of his neck about half- 
way between his ears and withers with the tack point # 
Do not hit the horse on the neck, but place the end of 
the stick there and press until the horse feels the prick 
of the tack point; this will make him shake his head 
just as he would to dislodge a fly. Immediately he 
does so, remove the stick, dropping your hand behind 
you so the stick is no longer visible to the horse. 
Repeat this, asking a question each time to which 
"No" is the correct answer, but being sure not to 
move your hand to raise the stick until after you have 
asked the question. After a few times the horse will 
shake his head when the stick touches his neck and 
before he feels the prick of the tack point because his 
experience has taught him that the raising of the 
stick is followed by a prick on the neck which nature 
has taught him to get rid of by shaking his head. A 
few lessons and it will only be necessary to raise the 
stick a trifle after asking the question and the horse 
will shake his head, and repeated lessons will enable 
you to stand away in front of the horse and ask 
questions, and by raising the hand apparently to 
brush a fly from your own neck or remove a cigar 
from your mouth, make the horse shake his head to 
answer "No " Does the horse understand what you 
actually say? He does not, and the best proof is that 
the horse will answer "No" on the signal being made 
regardless of what is said to it. Ask him the question 
in German, Russian. Japanese, Chinese or any other 
language and on the signal being made the horse will 
apparently answer "No;" actually he does not answer 
the question itself but answers the signal. 

To teach the horse to a- swer "Yes" by nodding or 
bowing bis bead, instead of touching him on the neck 
touch him on the breast, low down, nearly between 
the forelegs, and with many horses it is necessary to 
give quite a pressure of the tack point at first to cause 
tbem to nip at ' the bite, " for that is actually what 
they do, but in so doing they bow their head and ap- 
parently answer "Yes." Two things are important 
in teaching these tricks; never make a motion of the 
signal until after the question has been asked, for if 
made as the last word or two is spoken, the horse will 
answer too quickly and spoil the effect; and directly 
the horse shakes his head or bows remove the signal 
stick, dropping the hand out of sight. 

In the same manner the horse can be taught to 
count by pawing with his forefoot and from the 
original signal of a tap on the leg between the knee 
and pastern the signal can be reduced until a very 
slight movement of the trainer's finger or foot will be 
sufficient. This trick practiced to a point where the 
horse will paw at the least noticeable signal on the 
part of the trainer will enable you to make the horse 
answer all questions where it is necessary to answer in 
figures, such as asking the time, etc. If the answer 
should be ten minutes past three, make the horse paw 
ten times then give a fling of his head, easily taught 
on the same p inciple as the bow, and then paw three 
limes. 

To teach the horse to pick up numbers, etc., you 
must first teach it to grab at a white rag or handker- 
chief and this can be done by holding a pin between 
the fingers at the same time holding the white hand, 
kerchief; touch the horse with the pin on the point of 
the shoulder and he will grab at "the bite" and catch 
the handkerchief between his teeth. Let him take 
the handkerchief and he will soon learn to grab at it 
whenever the signal indicates a prick on the shoulder. 
The horse has then to be taught to travel slowly along 
sideways and stop instantly at the signal of command. 
Everybody has seen the circus horse pass slowly 
along the outside edge of the ring, suddenly stop, paw 
and uncover the hankerchief, then pick it up and 



bring it to the trainer. This is a combination or 
rather a series of several tricks quickly following each 
other. The horse had been taught to grab the hand- 
kerchief when he sees it; he has also been taught to 
paw, he has been taught to move around the ring and 
to stop when signalled to, and the picking up of num- 
bers is the combination of tricks followed out at one 
spot. He moves slowly past the numbers, stops at the 
signal of his trainer at the right one and on another 
signal grabs the number. It looks very clever; it 
looks as if the horse actually knew the number, but 
the cleverness all exists in teaching the horse to recog- 
nize the slightest possible signal and to answer it 
promptly. The trainer could take half a dozen 
photographs of, say, the last six presidents, or of 
six noted horses, or any other six subject6and makethe 
horse pick up any one he might select by merely men- 
tioning the name of it. He might ask for the picture 
of the mare that made the fastest trotting race record 
of the year and signal the horse to pick the picture of 
Sweet Marie. 

The attempt to make "Hans" answer questions 
when blindfolded proved total failures, and it was 
because he could not see the answers in the shape of 
the proper signals for them. Actually the horse does 
not understand language of any sort, but he does 
readily learn to connect certain sounds with certain 
signals or actions so will answer the ^unds before the 
signals are given or actions made In this manner a 
horse can be taught to start when the word "Whoa" 
is given and stop on the sound of "Get up." Substi- 
tute for these words the words "Carrots" for Whoa 
and Potatoes for "Get up," and you can teach ahor6e 
to start at the sound of Potatoes and stop when Car- 
rots is spoken. The principle is the same all the way 
through. The horse reasons from cause to effect and 
only acts as the result of past experiences, not present 
consideration or future calcualtions. — Exchange. 



A Molasses Diet. 

The trucking horses used by a big sugar refining 
firm in Brooklyn, N. Y., are such fine, big, sleek look- 
ing animals that their passage through the streets 
attracts attention, and horsemen generally believe 
that the cost of keeping them in such condition must 
be considerably above the average, says the Sun. 
This is not the case, however, for, in the stable of the 
firm an experiment of mixing molasses with the feed 
has been made and the plan has been found to be not 
only extremely economical but also of exceptional 
value in producing nourishment. It cost only thirtj- 
four cents a day to feed these fine horses which range 
from 1700 to 1800 pounds in weight. This, according 
to experts, is from twenty to twenty-seven per cent 
cheaper than the old system of maintaining the stock 
on oats and hay entirely. 

This is what the sugar refinery horses eat: In the 
morning they get a quart and a half of Indian corn 
meal, a quart of wheat bran, seven pounds of cut hay 
and a quart and a half of sugar house syrup which 
remains after all possible crystallization of 6ugar has 
taken place. 

As noon each horse gets fo'Ur or five quarts of oats 
and the night ration is the same as that in the morn- 
ing, except that five pounds of loose hay is placed in 
the stall in addition. 

The hygienic value of the molasses feed formu'a is 
proved by an experiment which was made on two 
rundown horses that had been kept upon ordinary 
rations. Their weights were 890 and 925 pounds when 
they were put on the molasses system, and both soon 
showed improvement in weight and health. At the 
end of six weeks the smaller had gained 200 pounds 
and the other w*s 181 pounds heavier. 

Novel and Profitable Trip. 

Determined to improve his wife's health by plenty 
of pure air and out-of-door "life, B. A. Richardson, 
who has just arrived at Belle Plaine, succeeded in ac- 
complishing his mission in a novel and unique manner. 
The family had been in the State of Washington for 
some time, and, longing to get back to Iowa, they 
started with a horse and wagon from Spokane July 
22, drove all the way to Belle Plaine, got home in 
time to start at once for Evanston to spend Thanks- 
giving, and Mrs. Richardson has fully recovered her 
lost health, thanks to the long and extended wagon 
ride. The distance traversed is nearly 2500 miles. 
The health of Mrs. Richardson began to improve as 
soon as the family had been on the trip two weeks, 
and today she is enjoying the health of her girlhood, 
the best of her life. — JJes Moines Register and Leader. 

Thinks It Excellent. 

Bio Rapids, Mich., Feb. 5, 1902. 
W. F. Young, P. V. F., Springfield. Mass. 

Dear Sir:— I think your Absorblne Is excellent. 

Yours truly, F. E. Hood 

Absorblne $2 per bottle, express prepaid. 

Address W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., Springfield, Mass. 



January 7, 19C5J 



Notes and News. 




Neva Simmons 2:11 i, the big winner of 1901, has 
been bred to The Bondsman, sire of Grace Bond 2:09}. 



Mr. Frank G. Jones, president of the Memphis 
Association, has quite a string of good ones wintering 
in charge of that wizard of the reins, Ed Geers, which 
he will campaign the coming season. Among others 
he has the great young trotter, Tom Axworthy 2:08i|, 
and Baron Grattan 2:04}. 



Lou Dillon and Major Delmar will have one of their 
match races next year over the two-miuute track at 
Readville. 

An offer of $3500 was lately refused for a yearling 
colt by Moko, dam Silicon II. 2:15|, owned by Clem 
Beachey, Jr. 

As to Billy Buch to 2:07}, he turns out to be the 
greatest snow horse in Pittsburg, and Mr. Callery got 
him for a song. 

Geers won three more races than any other Grand 
Circuit driver this past season. Snow and Spear were 
his nearest competitors with fifteen each. 



The State Fair Grounds at Sacramento are rapidly 
being dismantled and there will not ba one of the old 
buildings left standing by the last of this month. 

There were more new 2:10 trotters produced in 1904 
than ever before, but the number of new 2:15 trotters 
was smaller than in a number of previous seasons. 



A syndicate is said to have been formed in a Kansas 
town for the purpose of buying Direct Hal 2:04}, 
when the Hamlin horses are disposed of this winter. 

President McDoel, of the Monon Route, who owns 
among other horses Allerson 2:08£ and Irish 2:08}, 
has leased the Idle Hour Farm, near Macon, Ga., for 
winter quarter. 




Two-Tear-Old Brother to Sweet Marie 

Owned by J. C. Adams, Phoenix, Arizona 



It is now reported that Lon McDonald's new 
employer is R. L. Williams, a wealthy Boston sports- 
man, and that Lon has signed for three years at a 
salary of $7000 per year. 



Charles Marvin, instead of wintering as usual at 
Lexington, Ky., will this winter try Selma, Ala. He 
has two or three Futurity candidates in his stable and 
will band all his energies toward getting them in first 
class shape. 

W. D. Grand is quoted as saying that the reckless 
emasculation of full-made trotting stallions to make 
heavy harness horses has exhausted the supply and 
that the breed is now so nearly wiped out he doubts 
if it can be revived. 

Fifty-seven stallions were advertised in the stallion 
directory printed in our Christmas number. Out of 
these any breeder should be able to pick some that 
will do to mate his mares with. Fifteen of the fifty- 
seven were sired by McKinnoy. 

The stallion Stoneway was omitted from the list of 
standard sires prioted in our Christmas number. He 
is by Strathway and is the sire of My Way (3) 2:22, 
and Stonelita 2:20. Stoneway is owned by Geo. W. 
Kirkham of Exeter, Cal. 



W. L. McDonald, of Concord, Cal., has purchased 
from John Ott of Pacheco, the chestnut colt Count 
Valensin by Sidmoor, dam Belle by Alcona 730, she 
the dam of Gaff Topsail 2:16 and Enoch 2:12J. The 
colt is a fine, large promising trotter, and is entered 
in Breeders Futurity No. 3. 



Mr. S. C. Walton, the well-known trainer of Fresno, 
Cal., writes to the Breeder and Sportsman to the 
effect that the credit of training the two-year-old 
Athasham 2:20 is due him instead of Mr. Zibbellas 
stated in the Breeder and Sportsman. This paper 
simply stated that Mr. Zibbell trained and drove 
Athasham la9t year, which is correct, [t is true that 
Mr. Walton trained the colt and drove him in bis first 
race, but afterwards Athasham was turned over to 
Mr. Zibbell, who gave him all bis training thereafter 
and gave him his record of 2:20 in a race won in 
straight heats at Santa Rosa. 



The honor of marking the first new standard per- 
former bf the year 1905 is claimed by Jacob Brolliar, 
who gave the horse McGee by Robert Basler 2:20, a 
pacing record of 2:24} on Monday, January 2d, in a 
race over the track of the Tulare Fair Association at 
a regularly advertised meeting. 



A.H.Merrill, of Danvers Mass., has sold the Cali- 
fornia bred gray trotting gelding Who Is It 2:10,}, by 
Nutwood Wilkes 2:16}, son of Guy Wilkes 2:15}, dam 
Lassie Jean (dam of Dolly Marchutz 2:19}), by Briga- 
dier, to H. M. Clark. Springfield, Mass. 

The horsemen of Lewiston, Me., have organized a 
driving association. It is proposed to hold a number 
of matinees, with silver cups for prizes, and it may be 
decided to hold a few meetings with money prizes of 
sufficient size to attract outside horsemen. 

Owners of hoppled pacers will have a chance to get 
rid of them in England. Recently John Splan stated 
that he had an order to ship several of them to Eng- 
land if he could get them at the right prices. Prince 
Alert 1:59£ will make the class fashionable when he 
gets to going over there. 



Reports say that Ed Geers will give up his Lexing- 
ton avenue home, at Buffalo, and move his family to 
Memphis. For some twelve years the Geers family 
have resided in Buffalo, but since the trainer has 
severed his connections with Village Farm, he has 
been considering locating at Memphis. 



Mr. R. P. Lathrop, head of the Lathrop Hay Com- 
pany at Hollister, spent several weeks in Los Angeles, 
during December, attending to the delivery of over 
2000 tons of hay to the firm's patrons in Southern 
California. Hollister bay is the principal diet of Los 
Angeles horses during this season of the year. 



W. A. Clark, Jr , who owns the string of trotters 
and pacers that Ted Hayes trained at Pleasanton last 
winter and are now at Los Angeles, is not the first 
member of the family to race a stable in the Grand 
Circu'.t His father, Senator Clark, owned Major 
Wonder 2:09$, Faust 2:18}, Conde 2:19}, and others 
who went dow the big line a dozen years ago. 



Two sales of saddle geldings at $1000 each are re- 
ported from Kentucky. Alonzo McDonald, the 
trainer of trotters, bought Monte Marks Jr., by 
Monte Marks, dam Belle Harris by Black Squirrel, 
and F. Proctor, Utica, N. Y., bought Fred Proctor. 
The former is of the five-gaited variety and the latter 
of the three. 

A correspondent at Pleasanton sends us the infor- 
mation that Al McDonald last week worked the green 
mare by Zombro 2:11 out of a mare by Woolsey (own 
brother to Sunol 2:08.2), a IU U mi 'e in 2:16, last half in 
1:05}, last quarter in 31j seconds. This mare is one of 
the best gaited trotters ever seen on the Pleasanton 
track and acts like another Sweet Marie. 



McKinley 2:29 was accidently omitted from Mc- 
Kinney 's list of new standard performers that appeared 
in the Christmas number of this paper. McKinley is 
owned by Supervisor John W. Martin of Tulare 
county and his record was made at the Tulare fairlast 
year after but two months work. As McKinley is 16£ 
hands high and weighs over 1300 pounds Mr. Martin 
believes he is the fastest big trotter in California. 



Sandy Smith came up Irom Mr. A. B. SpreckeJs' 
Aptos Farm the Christmas week with a bay gelding 
by Cupid out of Gracie S., the dam of Dione 2:07}, 
that he took to Pleasanton where it is now in Col. J. 
C. Kirkpatrick's string and beiDg traim d by James 
Thompson. The gelding is a pacer and very promis- 
ing. Sandy reported that the three-year-old chcs-tnut 
stallion by Dexter Prince, dam Galata by Stamboul, 
second dam Jenny the dam of Hulda 2:08}, that is yet 
at Aptos,has grown into one of the handsomest horses 
ever foaled on the farm. Mr. Spreckels has been 
offered $3000 for him, but declined the offer. 



Grattan Boy 2:08, the trotting stallion which won so 
many races in the Grand Circuit for the late R. H. 
Plajt 9ome years ago, is dead in Louisiana A resi- 
dent of that State purchased him at the sale of Mr. 
Plant's horses in Lexington, but later resold him. 
Though he has onlv a few colt3 old enough to race 
and not many all told Grattan Boy was very promis- 
ing as a sire and his death is surely a great loss to 
Louisiana. 

Inferna 30,838, the stallion by Diablo 2:09} out of 
Biscari by Director, reduced his record to 2:17 over 
the Billing9, Montana, half-mile track last year. At 
the Montana State Fair at Helena last fall, Dr. C. D. 
Crutcher drove him a mile in 2:16 hitched to a 95- 
pound jog cart. Inferna was taken back all the way, 
but paced the last quarter in 31 2 seconds. He will be 
another 2:10 pacer for Diablo when he hits a good 
track and is given his head. 

Says la9t week's Trotter and Pacer: "General Nelson 
A. Miles was one of the conspicuous drivers on tbe 
Speedway last Friday. He was the guest of Mr. 
Nathan Straus and drove the black pacer Tony M. 
2:14}. The General got into the brushing game 
readily and was not headed in several in which be 
figured. He had four goes with Mr. Thomas Lynch's 
Bessie Duffy and W. C. Campbell's Susie G., and won 
each of them in driving finishes." 

Frank E. Wright of Sacramento has removed his 
string of horses in training to the Woodland track, 
and they arrived there last week in charge of Si 
Hess, his able assistant. The pacer Kelly Briggs 2:09} 
and the trotter H. D. B. 2:13, both good winners on 
the Pacific Coast circuit in 1904, are in the string, 
besides five or six others. It is probable that nearly 
all the trainers heretofore lining the Sacramento track 
will move their string s to Wood land. 

James Nolan, a trainer and d river who was in the 
employ of Palo Alto Stock Farm for several years, 
died in this city, last week, after a short illnefs. Mr. 
Nolan, who was known to many of his friends as 
"lied" on account of bis complexion, was a good 
horseman and during his life bad '.rained many that 
took fast records. He was in the employ of Mr. A. B. 
Spreckels after leaving Palo Alto, but left Aptos 
Farm to go to Cape Nome d uring the Alaska mining 
excitement some years ago. 

Mr. L. B. Spurgcon of Wheatland, Cal., asks for 
the pedigree of the pacing horse Costello that Vet 
Tryon campaigned in California and Montana some 
years ago. Costello is a black horse, according to the 
Year Book, and has a record of 2:24}, made at Port- 
land, OregOD, July 10,1891. He was foaled in 1883, 
and bred by J. B Haggin of Sacramento. His sire is 
Echo 462, son of Hamble'onian 10, and his dam Bessie 
Turner, also called Bessie Taylor, the dam of Sam 
Lewis 2:25. She was by St. Clair 656. The second 
dam of Costello was Rio Vista Maid by John Nelson 
187. 



The Cleveland Road Drivers' Association has 
arranged for the use of Euclid avenue, between Case 
and Sterling, a distance of nearly a mile, for a winter 
speedway. There are no crosswalks or intersecting 
streets in the section of Euclid avenue mentioned, and 
as the same is to be kept free from unnecessary traffic 
for two hours every afternoon during the sleighiDg 
season, the horsemen of Cleveland are preparing for 
an excellent winter sport. Secretary Geo. A.Schneider 
of the Road Drivers' Association, will be in charge of 
the speedway and matinees will be held Saturday 
afternoons, with ribbons to be awarded the winners 



It was at Kalamazoo, Mich., that Flora Temple first 
put the trotting mark below 2:20, on Oct. 35, 1859, and 
for many years after the famous Michigan village was 
a big center of trotting sport. Then bad times came 




Lady Rivers by Mambrino 1789 

Dam by Sweet Marie 2:04%, with Foal at Foot by Oh So 2:S5K 



and it dropped out of the circuH. But the old love 
for the trotter was not dead, it was only sleeping, and 
Kalamazoo will return to its early love and again be- 
come a harness horse center. A number of prominent 
citizens have organized and built a first-class mile- 
track, equipped with modern grandstand ard stables, 
and two harness racemeetings will be given in 1905. 
It is known as Recreation Park. The matinee game 
will also be a prominent recreation feature of Recrea- 
tion Park. 



One of the handsomest as well as one of the best 
bred young McKin ey stallions in California, Ed Mc- 
Kinney, will be located at Willows, Colusa county, 
tbis spring, in charge of James Sullivan, the well 
known horseman. Ed McKinney 's dam is the great 
broodmare Nona Y. 2:25, that is the dam of Nance 
O'Neil 2:09}, Chas. David 2:15 and Lady Rowena 2:18$ 
by Admiral 488, son of Volunteer 55 His second dam 
is Black Flora, dam of Sister 2:19$, Perihelion 2:25 
and Nona Y. 2:25 and Huntress 2:28 A McKinney 
stallion with tbe individuality Ed McKinney has, and 
with such great broodmares in his pedigree should 
get a large patronage in any community, especially at 
$25 the season. 



In Russia the progeny of the American trotting 
stallion and the Orloff mare is esteemed faster than 
either the true Orloff or the American article as it has 
baen brought in the land of the Czar. For instance 
Alvin 2:11, Baron Rogers 2:09jj, Nominee and many 
others thai might be named did service in this 
country before exportation and yet none of them left 
any progeny of any note whatever. However, in 
Russia as soon as mated with the Orloff mares all 
these three stallions have begotten phenomenal speed 
and staying qualities. A son of Alvin won the great 
Russian Trotting Derby of 1903, another son won the 
renewal of the same raco in 1904 and the older one 
proved the best four-year-old of the past season. 
Indeed all the latest and best Russian records have 
been set by these half-bred American-Orloff trotters 
and now the Russian breeders are asking themselves 
what would happen if their best mares should be bred 
to our best stallions and the progeny developed under 
American conditions. Two four-year-olds bred in 
this cross took records between 2:11 and 2:12 this 
summer and one got a two-mile record in a race of 
4:33$ Four-year-olds that can do such stunts as 
these are not common even in America. A heap of 
money can be got for tbe preen four-year-old that 
promises a mile in 2:11 or thereby the summer he is 
that age. 



6 



[January 7, 1905 



The Experiments to Breed Carriage Horses. 

The experiment which the U. S. Government will 
make in connection with the Agricultural College of 
Colorado, in establishinga breed of American Carriage 
Horses is thus told by Prof. W. L. Carlyle in a com- 
munication to the North Pacific Rural Spirit: 

I have your favor of December 19th, and in reply 
will say that I am very glad indeed to give you any 
information in my power relative to the work in horse 
breeding which we contemplate inaugurating here in 
co-operation with the United States Government. I 
am enclosing you herewith a clipping from one of our 
local papers, the result of an interview which the 
editor had with myself, which will give you a very 
clear idea of what the plans and conditions of experi- 
ment are. The $25,000 appropriated by Congress was 
for the purpose of establishing experiments in breed- 
ing in various parts of the country. Of this $25,000, 
$5000 will be spent in Alabama in developing a type 
of beef cattle suitable for Southern conditions. $1000 
has been given to the state of Maine in connection 
with their experiments for the development of an 
American breed of poultry of superior laying quali. 
ties. The remainder of the appropriation will go to 
Colorado. We intend to breed the highest type of 
carriage horse and we are selecting broodmares of 
desirable strains wherever we can find them, so long 
as they are American bred and without any ad- 
mixture of foreign coach blood. We do not antici. 
pate introducing any foreign coach blood, though 
later on it may be necessary in order to correct some 
deficiency, to introduce French coach or Hackney 
blood. 

We have already selected some eight or ten mares 
of the American trotter foundation. Most of these 
trace directly to Ethan Allen and are somewhat of the 
old Morgan type with a little more range and size 
perhaps. We are anxious to fix a type of the highest 
perfection of carriage horses and to establish a stud 
book for their registration so that they may be bred 
pure. We expect to disseminate the ycung stock 
bred from this stud into the various sections of the 
country where suitable foundation mares are to be 
found and after rigid selection, we will register the 
desirable offspring so as to found the breed as quickly 
as possible, and yet safeguard the type. 1 trust that 
this will give you the information desired. I appre- 
ciate very much your interest in the mitter and will 
hope for your support in the work. Following is the 
clipping refered to: 

"The agreement batween the United States govern- 
ment and the state agricultural college which secures 
to Colorado and Fort Collins another important 
government experiment station, was signed at the 
meeting of the board of agriculture. 

''The station is established for the purpose of 
developing through the breeding of the best stock 
obtainable, of an American type and breed of horses. 

"At present nearly all breeds of horses, cattle and 
sheep are founded in Great Britian, and are being 
constantly imported to this country. 

"During the past year millions of dollars have been 
spent in foreign stallions for breeding purposes in 
this country. The same is true of sheep, though not 
to so large an extent, and of cattle. 

"It is believed by those interested in the experi- 
ments to be conducted, that by scientific breeding 
and care, a truly American type and breed of carriage 
horses can be developed from the blooded stock al- 
ready here, which shall be so adapted and suited to 
the various conditions here as to be superior to any 
stock that can be imported There is a strong de- 
mand for such a breed of animals all over thecountry, 
and the experiments here will be watched with great 
interest by horsemen in all parts of the United States. 
Several applications from private breeders in Cali- 
fornia and in the East have been received to inspect 
the stDck when secured and kept advised of the pro- 
gress of the experiments. 

' The idea originated at the meeting of the board of 
agriculture last year, and E. B. Grubb, Dr. Ayles- 
wort and Professor Carlyle were appointed a com- 
mittee to bring the matter before Congress and the 
Department of Agriculture at Washington. 

"With the assistance of Congressman Brooks and 
Senators Teller and Patterson, they were successful 
in securing an appropriation of $25,000 for use in 
carrying on experiments in breeding to be expended 
by the Secretary of Agricultural through the bureau 
of animal industry. Most of this money will be ex- 
pended here this year. 

"The agreement s». i d on Thursday provides for 
co-operative experime.* - of the Department of Agri- 
culture of the United States and the Colorado State 
Agricultural College and provides for the establish- 
ment of experiments in horse breeding to study the 
possibility of developing American trotting breeds of 
horses. 

"The government agrees to furnish twenty or 



more mares and one or two stallions of the highest 
type of horses to be secured from the American trot- 
ters and their progeny. 

"These horses are to be selected and purchased by a 
board consisting probably of Dr. D. E. Salmon, at the 
head of the bureau of animal industry, representing 
the government, M. H. Tichenor of Chicago, one of 
the leading horse dealers and breeders in this country, 
representing the breeders, and Prof. W. L. Carlyle, 
representing the college. It has also been asked that 
Messrs. E. B. Grubb and Jesse Harris act as an ad- 
visory board. The government will provide an ex- 
pert groom and pay part of the salary of the expert 
in charge of the experiments, who will be Prof. Car- 
lyle. The original stock belongs to the government, 
while all progeny goes to the college. 

"The results of the experiments are to be published 
conjunctively by the Department of Agriculture and 
the college. 

The progeny will be disseminated throughout horse 
breeding centers where suitable foundation stock is to 
be had in order to build up in this way an American 
carriage horse. Experiments will also be made in 
breeding to western mares, such as are found on many 
of our best farms, to demonstrate to the western 
people, that with careful breeding and care a founda- 
tion stock is already here for the production of a 
high class carriage horse. One reason why the ex- 
periments were established in Colorado was the well 
know fact that horses bred in the mountain regions 
are possessed of great superior quality of legs and feet, 
owing to the grassos and dryness of the climate, and 
the possibility, which the» conditions of the climate 
admit, of having the horses very largely out of doors 
during the experiments as opposed to eastern con- 
ditions where they must be closely confined during a 
considerable portion of the year without exercises. 
It is hoped to be able to secure the entire breeding 
stud by spring, in order that they may become ac 
climated before the breeding season commences. The 
colors to be tried this year will be bays, browns and 
chestnuts. Most of the breeding of blooded horses in 
this country has been for speed. It is hoped by these 
experimentsto produce a large sized, beautiful finished 
horse with style, grace, action and intelligence. 



The 2:15 Sires. 

A stallion's ability to sire speed is no longer gauged 
by the number of his get that can trot a mile against 
time in 2:29} on a perfect track with weather picked 
to suit. The 2:30 list is getting rather obsolete, and 
stallions that do not have a few representatives in the 
2:15 list after a reasonable time in the stud are not 
counted as great sires of speed The 2:15 list is assum- 
ing large proportions and occupies many pages of the 
average weekly journal devoted to horse literature 
whenever it is printed. There are now fifty stallions 
that have sired ten or more 2:15 performersand the ex- 
California sire McKinney leads the list. These horses 
and the number of 2:10 performers sired by each is 



as follows: 

McKinney 2:11} 34 

Gambetta Wils:es2:19} 32 

Alcantara 2:23 31 

Baron Wilkes 2:18 29 

Brown Hal 2:12$ 29 

Simmons 2:28 29 

Red Wilkes 2:40 24 

Wilton 2:19} 23 

Ashland Wilkes 2:17} 22 

Bourbon Wilkes 22 

Direct 2:05* 21 

Sidney 2:19} 20 

Allerton 2:09} 19 

- Chimes 2:30J 19 

Guy Wilkes 2:15} 19 

Robert McGregor 2:17* 18 

Sphinx 2:20} 18 

Chas. Derby 2:20 16 

Wilkes Boy 2:24$ 16 

Adrian Wilkes 15 

MambrinoKing 15 

Pilot Medium 15 

Altamont2:26} 14 

Axtell2:12 14 

Online 2:04 14 

Strathmore 14 

Alcander 2:20* 13 

Anderson Wilkes 2:22} 13 

Dexter Prince 13 

Electioneer 13 

Nutwood 2:18} 13 

Prodigal 2:16 13 

Stein way 2:25} 13 

Bobby Burns 2:19} 12 

Diablo 2:09* 12 

Jay Bird 2:31} 12 

Alcyone 2:27 11 

C. F. Clay 2:18 11 

Norval2:14} 11 

Patron 2:14} 11 

AUie Wilkes 2:15 10 

Billy Wilkes 2:29*. 10 

>. Bow Bells 2:19} 10 

Greystone 10 

Hambletonian Wilkes 10 

Highwood 2:21 10 

McEwen 2:18$ 10 

Roy Wilkes 2:06$ 10 

Shadeland Onward 2:18$ 10 

Tennessee Wilkes 2:27 10 



In reading over the above list, one is struck with 
the preponderance of Wilkes stallions, no less than 
twenty-stx of them being descended in the male line 
from that great sire. 



News from Victoria. 

Victoria, B.C., Dec. 26, 1904. 

Breeder and Sportsman:— Messrs. J. r. and J. 
H. Wilkinson, of Chilliwack, British Columbia, have 
lost by death their premier stallion, Colloquy 18051, 
son of Bay Bird, dam Soliloquy by Commodore Bel- 
mont, second dam by Mambrino Patchen. Colloquy 
was a very fine stallion in conformation, speed and 
breeding, and ha9 sired a lot of promising colts in 
British Columbia. A pair of bay mares by him took 
first prize at Winnipeg and at every fair and exhibi- 
tion in Western Canada this past .-eason. Messrs. 
Wilkinson Bros, are the owners of a fine farm and are 
building a three-quarter mile race track. right on trie 
farm on which they will develop the colts and fillies 
raised by themselves. The Wilkinson band of brood- 
mares is a select lot. J.H.Wilkinson is an up-to- 
date breeder and buys only the best bred mares for 
his ranch. In an interview with the writer a few 
days since, Mr. Wilkinson stated that he was now 
looking for a very well bred stallion, one that had a 
record as a tried race horse and one that had a good 
list of performeis with standard records. Added to 
the latter requirements he wants good looks, sound- 
ness and good disposition. He doe9 not want one 
bred on quite the same lines as Collcquy, as thero are 
a great many Colloquy fillies in British Columbia be- 
sides those owned at the Wilkinson farm. Here's a 
chance for some California owner to sell a good stallion 

King Patchen by Mambrino King is owned at Van- 
couver, B. C, and is siring good colts. His fastest 
one by the records is Glengarry Patchen, pacer, 2:16}, 
one of the best looking pacers to be seen any where, 
and a game racehorse. King Patchen puts the beauti- 
ful finish of Mambrino King on his get and gives them 
good size as well. This country is short on well bred 
mares. Just why men wiil breed mares with one dam, 
and in most cases no known breeding to a high bred 
horse like King Patchen and Colloquy and pay forty 
dollars for the service and expect a racehorse frcm 
such a union is a poser to me. 

The writer tried to Ox up a colt stake for British 
Columbia, bred and raised three year olds last fall in 
Victoria. The Association got one entry, and the 
country full of good colts. Still the Association will 
try again to get up a British Columbia Occident stake 
for 1904. 

William Stevenson, owner of Fannie Putnam 2:13$, 
has a four-year-old pacing stallion, sired by Tenny- 
sonian, son of Electricity. That is one of the highest 
class green pacers that I have ever seen. His dam 
Fanny Putnam was raced over the Grand Circuit by 
Andrew MacDowell, and she was a game mare. 
Later on she raced in California, and was a hard nut to 
crack. Her colt's name is Captain Jotn and he will 
also be a hard nut to crack when he comes to a race. 
No doubt there are a lot of good ones in California, 
but I have no hesitancy in sajing out loud that Van- 
couver Island has one that is a good one, and barring 
accidents my predictions about Captain John will 
come good. Keep an eye on this chestnut pacer. 
Christmas, the sire of Fanny Putnam, is passing his 
feeble old ago in luxury which speaks volumes for his 
owner, Mr. J. A. Say ward. Cbrist_nas has about got 
ready to drop out. Ho sired a great many fine horses 
here, Fanny Putnam being the only one ever trained. 
All that I have seen are good lookers but of a 
fractious disposition. 

Wishing the Breeder and Sportsman and every 
horseman a Happy New Year, I remain, 

Very truly yours, 
C. A. Harrison. 

Death of Acolyte 2:21. 

The stallion Acolyte 2:21, by Onward 2:25}-Lady 
Alice, by Almont, died from colic in Philadelphia, Pa., 
Dec. 20, age 20 years. He became celebrated some 
fifteen years ago when bis breeder, the late Col. R. P. 
Pepper, of Kentucky, sold him to J. S. Coxey, of Mas- 
sillon, O., for, it was reported, $40,000. Coxey placed 
him in the stud and kept him therefor a term of 
years, but when his vagaries culminated in the or- 
ganization of "Coxey's army," and its march to 
Washington, the stallion headed the procession with 
his erratic owner on his back. Later, when "the 
General" got into financial straits he parted with 
Acolyte, who, during recent years had passed through 
numerous hands. Acolyte sired eighteen standard 
performers, the fastest being Aerolite 2:09} trotting 
and Pilgrim 2:10} pacing. 

Chicago. III., April 3, 1891. 

Dr. S. A. T utile. Boston. Mime. 

Dear Sir:— Owing lo my dealing In horses, buying and selling 
them In great numbers. I nave used In my own barn and given to 
my neighbors about sixty to eighty dozen bottlesof you^ Elixir, 
and have never lost a horse since I used It. I give a dose to every 
horse that I bring In from the country lor the purpose of acclimat- 
ing them, and throi gh the same have as yet had only the best 
results. I cagnot say too much for your Elixir. I am never with- 
out it in my barn. Yours respectfully. 

Martin maykrhofer, 
118 and 120 Basting Street. 



January 7, 1905 



U THOROUGHBREDS. g 



the medium of a gigantic "clean up" the 
afternoon, he being backed by Mrs. Cora Eckert 
and her friends from 15 to 1 down to 7 to 1 and win- 
ning by three lengths easily after leading every inch 
of the route of six furlongs. 



The hoggish action of the Western Jockey Club 
stewards in refusing dates to the new New Orleans 
and Essex Park (Hot Springs) clubs has undoubtedly 
precipitated a turf war of immense dimensions in the 
Middle West and South. Edward Corri°an now owns 
the Hawthorne track, has an interest of $100,000 in 
the new New Orleans plant which H. D. Brown was 
instrumental in building, and has a large interest in 
the Elm Ridge (Kansas City) track. William Shan- 
non and H. Devereaux of Essex Park ire great friends 
of the big turfman and racing magnate, and will un- 
doubtedly co-operate with him, and it is among the 
probabilities that the Worth, Nashville and Latonia 
people will join hands with Corrigan against the 
"sure thing" men from St. Louis who are trying to 
form a racing trust in the Middle West and South. 
Last Tuesday the W. J. C. stewards, by a vote of 3 to 
2, refused to revise the objectionable dates except so 
far as Louisville was concerned, that club receiving 
an additional five days. The failure to grant dates 
to the New Orleans people will be joyful news to the 
men who raced at the Union (St. Louis) track last 
season. Though having better and fairer racing by 
far at Union than the Cella-Adler-Tilles crowd fur- 
nished at their tracks around the Mound City, that 
fact being indisputable, some 650 horses were placed 
under the ban by the Western Jockey Club (which is 
but another name for Cella, Adler, Tilles, John Con- 
don and C. S. Bush), men who have made millions in 
the past half-dozen years by forming a "racing trust" 
in the territory mentioned and strangling competition. 
If the histories of the St. Louis "magnates" is ever 
written up correctly it will open the eyes of the people 
who pay their dollars at the race track gates to the 
fact that those who are supposed t,o be catering to 
their amusement in a racing way should be breaking 
rock in some institution with a high wall around it, 
instead of making dates for racing clubs and dictating 
to decent men who put their money into race tracks. 
Someday I may write a history of these "magnates," 
who, not so many years ago, were engaged in a busi- 
ness that ought to have kept the police pretty busy, 
and later on ran an electric light night track, the 
memory of which leaves a brown taste in one's mouth. 
Turf "outlaws" themselves for a long time, these 
men managed to gather enough coin to buy a control- 
ling interest in three tracks in and around St. Louie, 
were taken into the Western Jockey Club fold, and 
now dictate the policy of that organization. How- 
ever, out of their piggish actions may come great 
good to the turf in their part of the world, for doubt- 
less a new governing turf body will be evolved that 
will give breeders a voice in its management. That 
the new order will be a boon to breeders, who will 
have to furnish double the number of horses for rac- 
ing purposes in the South and Middle West and it is 
a source of satisfaction to the writer that this will 
come about, just as I outlined it in my correspondence 
from St. Louis last season. 



There were no less than five very close finishes on 
Tuesday, Hainault being the only easy winner of the 
day. Horatius and Preckman ran almost as a team 
for over a quarter of a mile in the concluding race, 
former getting the verdict in the last jump by a nose, 
tiood horses of the long ago were much in evidence 
that afternoon, Barrack winning at a mile and fifty 
yards and Cousin Carrie at six furlongs. 



Jockey John Bullman is fast "rounding to, " and 
last Monday rode the two-year-old Daruma and Sol 
Lichtenstein to victory in clever style. Tuesday he 
was successful on Barrack. Travers is looming up, 
riding one winner on Monday and two on Tuesday. 

Ralph H. Tozer. 



The first two-year-old race of the season took place 
at Emery ville last Monday, January 2d, and was won 
in fine style by a very handsome chestnut filly named 
Daruma, from the Napa Stock Farm paddocks of 
A. B. Spreckels. This fleet youngster, which ran 
three furlongs over a very heavy track in 0:36| with 
111 lbs. up, is by the magnificent young English horse 
Solitaire (son of Ayrshire)out of Georgia VI by Prince 
of Norfolk. The Solitaire yearlings averaged $1600 
at the New York sale last summer, which, for an un- 
tried sire's get, was a price almost unprecedented. 
They were grand lookers; however, and do not belie 
their appearance, apparently. Mr. Spreckels was 
mightily pleased over the victory of Daruma, and 
had a substantial wager down in addition. The sec- 
ond horse in the race, Sir Wilfred, ran a winning race 
himself from a stai't not of the best, and had been 
highly tried in private. He is by the splendid Or- 
monde horse, Ossary, from Plumeria (dam of Shell- 
mount) by imp. Eagle's Plume. Plumeria is an own 
sister to May W. and Dora I. Thus two new sires 
came to the front with rapid bounds, and it is my be- 
lief that both will take a prominent place in thebreed- 
ing history of the Golden State. 



Claude added another grand victory to his long 
string on Monday in the New Year's Handicap, one 
mile and a furlong. With 132 pounds up, the little 
bay horse was badly interfered with on the far turn 
by Modicum, but came like a cyclone upon a Kansas 
shanty in the homestretch, catching Bombadier a few 
yards from the finish and beating him out a scant 
neck amid the cheers of an admiring multitude. 



Rector, an English gelding by Crowberry-Lenten 



From Los Angeles. 

After two severe rain storms and a spell of cold 
weather, the weather seems to have returned to its 
normal condition of bright and sunny days with no 
chill in the air. No day in June could have been 
fairer than New Years Day and the largest crowd 
whichever passed through the turnstiles at Ascot 
Prrk was on hand to see a program of high class 
events run off. The Rose Handicap with a value of 
$1870 to the wiuner was won by Luckett, with High 
Chancellor in the place and Eva G. third. Fossil also 
ran a good race winning a seven furlongs handicap in 
the fast time of 1:26£. The first two-year-old race of 
the season, in this part of the country, was won by 
Lady Walker, a very promising filly by Oakwood- 
Cora Belle who displayed great speed, running the 
three furlongs in thirty-five seconds. Lady Walker 
is owned by J. E. Cushing, who won the American 
Derby with Boundless and Mr. Cushing profited con- 
siderably by the victory of his mare. 

The Steeplechase wa- marred by an accident in 
which Jimmy Coffey's gelding Galanthus broke his 
neck over the first jump. The steeplechasers here do 
not amount to much and most of them have difficulty 
in getting over the jumps and staying the distance. 

Last Saturday the Mt. Lowe Handicap was run off 
and was the occasion of the re-appearance of Cruzados 
who has not been started in a race since last spring; 
this horse with 118 lbs. spreadeagled his field winning 
by himself in a common canter with Fossil ten lengths 
away and such good ones as John F., Tyrolian, Fire- 
ball, Luckett and Tim Payne strung out behind him. 
Cruzados set a heart breaking pace, running the first 
half mile in :47£ over a muddy track, and finishing 
out the six furlongs in 1:14|; he seems to have returned 
to his old form and reflects great credit on his new 
trainer, T. H. Cooke, who sent him to the post in the 
pink of condition. 

Last week Green Morris's two-year-old filly, Gold 
Rose, carrying ninety-five pounds, broke the track 
record for a mile running the distance in 1 :38J. She 
ran the six furlongs to the head of the stretch in 1:12J 
and thereafter was not urged; had anything been 
able to give her a race there is no question but what 
she would have run close to the world's record. This 
makes six consecutive wins for her and a few days 
after she was started in a two-year-old handicap with 
122 pounds in the saddle, this race was supposed to 
give a line on her weight carrying abilities as she had 
always carried lightweight. Unfortunately she was 
left at the post and the question as io how good a 
mare she is, is still unsettled. 

Things are pretty lively here in the selling race 
line and an owner when he enters a horse is rather 
doubtful as to whether he will get him back out of 
the race or not; this state of affairs was inaugurated 
by J. J. McCafferty who claimed Funnyside for $575. 
Sam Doggett retaliated by running up Emperor of 
India to $2000 and securing him at that price. Chub 
was then claimed by W. L. Austin for $1275; he ran 
once in the colors of his new owner and was then 
claimed by J. J. McCafferty for $1225 making three 
ownerships of the horse in one week. Dutiful, the 
wise grey horse, formerly in McCafferty's stable was 
purchased by R. Turner, out of the selling race which 
he won last. Andrew Mack after his win was run up 
to $1905, and retained by Mr. Turner at that figure. 
Emily Oliver was claimed by Al Gooden for $525 and 
was a bargain at the figure named. After his race on 
Tuesday Instructor was claimed by H. Stover who 
secured him for $825 but afterwards returned him to 
his owner. Laureate* was claimed by Jas. Frayling 
after winning on Friday, the price paid was $600; 
this is the second horse Mr. Pelter has lost In two 
days but when spoken to on the matter expressed 
himself as having no kick to make as it was part of 
the game. J J. McCafferty also secured Jingler out 



of a selling race paying $425 for the gelding. Frank 
Reagan also took a hand in the game running up 
Blissful from $500 to $1500, the mare was retained by 
Mr. Bonseck, her owner, but as Mr. Reagan was 
second with McGrathiuna Prince he did very well 
out of the race. 

There has been quite a lot of rough riding lately 
and owing to the lack of patrol judges much of It 
could not be seen from the judge's stand. Hildebrand 
was finally spotted and a line of $100 was promptly 
imposed which has since tended to keep the jockeys 
in order. 

The purses have been raised and now no race is 
given for less than $400. On New Year's day there 
were eighteen books and three field books in opera- 
tion, which is the record for this track. On last 
Thursday twenty head of yearlings, two-year-olds and 
three-year-olds, the property of Porter Ashe were 
sold by auction. These youngsters were the get of 
Homer, Jackson, Ruinart and imp. Tarcoola, and 
averaged $145, which was a very fair price consider- 
ing they were mostly by untried sires. 

Geo. B. Kellky. 



Trotting in Austria. 

Mrs. Andy McDowell, formerly' of California, but 
now a resident of Austria where her husband is train- 
ing a large string of trotters for a wealthy Austrian, 
writes as follows to the Trotter and Pacer in regard to 
the racing there: 

Racing in Austria is principally run on the handicap 
system, and in most respects it is interesting, but as 
with our racing at home it has its drawbacks which 
the rulers of the sport are always end eavoriDg to over- 
come. The principal obstacle is the starting of the 
fields. In many instances there are three tiers of 
horses starting from the same post, and as they must 
all circle in one direction until they head the starter 
simultaneously it causes an endless amount of turning, 
which becomes so tedious and tiresome that one 
wonders at the immunity from accidents and also 
wonders at the patience displayed by the judge, who 
must needs be a master hand to handle a field of 
horses that at times are scattered over the track for a 
distance of over three hundred metres. 

The system in question makes many American 
horses which have achieved marked success at home 
practically worthless for raciDg purposes here, as so 
much turning spoils all the chances of a double gaited 
horse, which, if sunt away on even terms with the 
field and well on to his stride could not be induced to 
make a wrong move thereafter. 

Daring the progress of the season here there are 
occasionally heat races, and I have noticed that on 
the days when these occur the crowds are pei eeptib'.y 
larger, and the spectators seem to show a marked in- 
terest in the events before mentiene d. In my opinion, 
if the club conld be induced to give one or two heat 
races each week throughout the s- ason it would be so 
thoroughly approved by the public that that plan 
of racing would become thoroughly established, as 
identical with the racing interests, and would be the 
salvation of many a good norse, as the distance would 
be shorter and the time materially faster. This latter 
item I regard as an important factor, as fast time 
always infuses enthusiasm into a crowd, and is one of 
the features which have made trotticg in America 
one of the foremost sports in the world. 

Age of Kendall's Spavin Cure. 

There isa peculiarity about the advertising ot Kendall's Spavin 
Cure which we would be glad to have our readers note. Almost 
without exception the advertising Is based on tcstiuionlts uf 
users. Our readers, who have been familiar willi it in th^e 
columns for years, have noted lhat its character does not change. 
This is undoubtedly good policy in the Dr. B. J Kendall Company. 
It is their peculiar good fortune to have an army of good users of 
this remedy who have not be .n without It for many years, and 
many of them have been using it to the exclusion of all other 
methods to cure their horses of spavins, ringbones, curbs, splints, 
wounds, lamenesses, etc. It is no uncommon ihiug to read testi- 
monials from those who have imcd Kendall's Spavin Curo for 
fifteen or twenty years It has been now about thirty years since 
the remedy was comp unded It has been the most popular 
remedy of the kind all that time It has attained a wonderful 
popularity. There are calls for It everywhere and we venture 
that there Is hardly a drug store in the country where It Is not 
sold. It is remarkable that it (should have continued SO univer- 
sally popular for so long a time. No other remedy hi*. And yet 
why should It not? Originally compounded by the noted veteri- 
nary surgeon. Dr. S J Kendall, and used by h m In his practice 
in treating the abovo named horse ailments, it proved to be 
almost an Infallible remedy. These ailments are just as con mnn 
now as they were In Dr. B. J Kendall's day. The remrdyisjhe 
same. It Is still manufactured by tho Company which leaves the 
veterinarian's name. Forthlrty years it has been proving itself 
to be of highest worth Tho Company Is wise to avail themselves 
of the record it has made In their advertising. Every reader of 
this paper who owns a horse should procure a copy of the free 
book entitled "A Treatise on the Horse ard His Diseases" Get 
It of your druggist or wrlto the Dr B .1. Kendall Company for it 
at the address given in the advertisement. 

A Good Investment 



For any horse owner Is mado when he buys a supply of Craft's 
Distemper & Cough Curo. This treatment has been so effective 
uniformly in driving out the distemper germs that it Is now com- 
monly known as the sure cure for the influenza, and especially 
adapted for coughs, epizootic, catarrhal fever, pinkeye, shipping 
fever and kindred germ diseases It Is not advisable to wait until 
the horse Is sick. This liquid Is a preventive which may be given 
regularly twlco a week with the food and acts as a tonic to brace 
up the horso with vigor and to bar from Its system the disease 
germs which are so undesirable. Our readers should note tho 
advertisement In or columns of the Wells Medicine Co., Laf aye tte r 
Indiana. 



8 



mite gv&ttcv antr gyortsmcm 



[January 7, 19(5 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. Ue WITT. 




Habits ot the Moose. 



sagas ^^jG -^sss 



Coming Events. 

Bod. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. I6-Feb. 1— Open season for taking stoel- 
oead In tidewater. 

Nov. 1-Aprll 1— Trout season closed. 

Sept. 1-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Jan. l-July 1 —Close season for black bass. 

Aug. I5-Aprll I— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16 -Close season in tidewater for steelbead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. lii-Close season for catching salmon. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Dan. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15-Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
iage ben. 

Oct. 15-Feb. 15— Open season :or quail, ducks, eto. 
Nov. I-July 15— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 
1905. 

Jan. 19 20— Bay State Co-operative Bench Show Association. 
Lyon, Mass. Tom 11. Middlebrooke, Clerk. 

Jan. 24. 26 Rhode Island Kennel Club. Providence, R. I. B. 
M. French, Secretary. 

Jan. 25, 28— National Fanciers and Breeders Association. 5th 
annual show. Chicago. W. K. L. rules. T A. Howard, Superin- 
tendent. Chicago, Ills. 

Feb. 13, 16— Westminster Kennel Club. New York City. Robt. 
V. McKim, Secretary. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb. 21,21— New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass. Wm. B. 
Emtry. Secretary. H E. Gero, Show Secretary. 

March 21. 21— Buffalo KennelClub, Seymour P. White, Secretary. 

March 29-Apr. 1— Long Island Kennel Club. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jos. M Dale, Secretary. 

March 8, 11— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania. 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred'U S. Stedman, Secretary. 

April 19, 22— Atlantic City Kennel Club. Atlantic City, N.J. 
Thos H. Terry, Secretary. 

Held Trials. 
1»05 

American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 

Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1901, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Jan. 9— Paclilc Coast Field Trials Club. Bakerstleld. Cal. 
Albert Betz, Secretary, 201 Parrotl Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan 9— Texas Field Trials Club. 3rd annual trials. Near San 
Antonio, Tex. T. A. Ferlet, Secretary, San Antouio, Tex. 

Jan. 10— Georgia Field Trial Association. Albany, Ga. P.M. 
Essig, Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan. 16— United States Field Trials Club. Grand Junction, 

enn. W. B Stafford. Seoretary-Treasurer, Trenton, Tenn. 

Changes Advocated in Oregon Game Laws. 

Game Warden Baker has filed with Governor 
Chamberlain his annual report, showing work of the 
past year. An important feature of the report is the 
discussion of the disappearance of game in the state, 
and how best to prevent it He suggests that for five 
years the snle of upland birds should be prohibited, 
and that the l ; mit should be cut from ten to five birds 
a day. He also suggests that twenty d ucks in a day 
is a sufficiency for any man to kill. 

With its somewhat startling recommendations, the 
report is one well worth the attention of every sports- 
man. The game warden is undoubtedly zealous in his 
his ideas, but in several respects it will be seen be 
ad vocates too extreme measures. It reads as follows: 

Few people realize that the fish and game of a state 
are among the most attractive and profitable re- 
sources. This is mainly due to the fact that very few 
persons have given the matter any consideration. 
Almost every person either enjoys the gun or the 
fishing rod and will embrace every opportunity to 
take a shot or ca9t the fly; but the matter of protect- 
ing or preserving the game and fish is never seriously 
considered. This condition in Oregon arises from the 
fact tnat we have plenty and "abundance." Very 
few ever think of the future or what will become of 
the fish and game if not rigidly protected, 'ihey care 
and think only for the present. 

The grandest and finest of Oregon's game animals, 
the elk, are not very numerous. I recommend that 
they be protected entirely for the next ten years. 
During the last year two parties have been convicted 
for the unlawful killing of elk; two more are now 
under indictment by the grand jury for the same 
offense. In some cases parties have been known to 
take only the teeth, after bavin > killed the elk, leav- 
ing horns, hide and meat in the mountains 

In some of the remote parts of the state the deer 
skinner still pursues his infamous practice of killing 
for the hides. It is impossible to reach many of these 
cases, owing to cost of making these long and ex- 
pensive trips in the mountains. Many convictions 
have been sec tired for violating the deer law during 
the last year, "he practice of the "game hog," who, 
regardless of th low, chases deer with hounds at all 
seasons of the yea r, should be the subject of vigorous 
and.careful legldation. Many of those hunters are 
too lazy to hunt an rely upon dogs to do the work, 
while they sit on, the tiank of some stream, or upon 
some run way, waiting for the deer to make its ap- 
pearance, and at the same time they are willing to 
swear that, they are after cougar or wolves. The 
running of deer with dogs should be permitted during 
the month of October of each year. I earnestly sug- 
gest that during «he months of April, May, June and 
July all dogs seen chasing deer he killed, and the 
killer be exempt from prosecution. During the 
months of April and May, the gravid female deer are 



not in condition to protect themselves. Pemalo dee.' 
should be protected at all times. 

The cougar is a great destroyer of deer. A bounty 
should be placed upon each cougar killeu. The timber 
wolf in some localities Is also very destructive. The 
wildcat destroys many fawns. Many alleged cases of 
violations of the game laws are, upon a close investi- 
gation, found to be untrue — almost always greatly ex- 
aggerated; in some the spirit of malice is the moving 
cause of complaints. 

During this year, reports concerning the Mongolian 
or China pheasant are very conflicting as to the num- 
ber of these birds From some counties reports come 
to this office that they are more numerous than last 
year, while others report less. The only reason I can 
give for this is, that the farmer and his boys and 
many city hunters in some parts of the state are more 
addicted to hunting than iu others. 

The question of ho w best and most effectually to 
protect the upland birds of Oregon is one that is hard 
to solve. The limit of one day 's hunt should be five 
birds only. The U9e of the dog should be prohibited 
for three years, or, if permitted at all, confine the 
time to the last 15 days of the open season. 

Referring to the Oregon native pheasant he says: 
These birds have been on the decrease for the last 
fifteen years. They should be protected entirely for 
five years. 

Grouse are more numerous than last season owing-, 
I think, to the extra good season for hatching and 
raising the young. 

Quail are in some parts of the state greatly on the 
inc-ease. I think from reports from Josephine and 
Jackson counties this is the case. Much credit is duo 
the sportsmen of- these two counties for their true 
sportsmanliko manner of obeying the law. No two 
other coun lies so far as birds are concerned can show 
the same record. 

Klamath and Lake counties are noted for their ex- 
tensive breeding grounds for d ucks. lam pleased to 
report that this section of the state has been well 
guarded through the vigilanceand industry of Deputy 
Game Warden M. E. Hutchison, assisted by E. G. 
Hodson, of Douglas county. 

The California poacher is fast becoming a back 
number in and about tho lakes of the southeastern 
part of Oregon. The late wet weather and extreme 
high wa er las. spring and early summer was a great 
d rawback to the breeuing birds in that section. The 
law permitting one hunter to kill fifty ducks in one 
day, is a shame and a disgrace upon the statutes of 
any state. Twenty is a large and sufficient number 
for any one hunter to kill in one day. 

Geese should be killed at any season, but prohibited 
at all times on nesting or roosting places. 

The limit of one day 's catch is 125 of mountain and 
brook trout; this should be changed. Seventy-five 
would be an ample catch for any true fisherman. I 
think salmon trout should be canght during October 
and November of each year, and with hook and line 
only. 

Bass are being caught in many stre-ams iD Oregon 
and are, I think, increasing very rapidly. 

The farmer is in a great many instances very much 
opposed to the game laws and their enforcement. 
Frequent complaints are made against the "city 
chap's" utter disregard of the rights of the farmer 
over his own premises. The practice of some hunters 
using tde wire nippers with which to effect an en- 
trance for his dog through the farmer's fence, is 
enough to make the farmer feel that he has been 
greatly wronged, in this caso. However much the 
farmer may be wronged, he should enforce the tres- 
pass law upon all hunters for a few times, and then 
they would respect both the law and the farmer. 

When the hunter and the farmerareconvinced that 
the laws protecting game are for all, then and not till 
then will the game laws be respected. 

The Oregon Fish and Game Protection Association, 
of Portland, has done and is doing much by way of 
enforcing the law relative to the protection of game, 
and especially I desire to mention in this connection 
the name of Mr. A. E. Gebhardt, who is vigilant and 
untiring in his work. 

Twelve or fifteen deputies should be employed in 
this state. The question to be considered next is how 
to secure money enough to pay these men. They will 
not work without some compensation. 

This question has been discussed throughout the 
slate by many hunters and by those who do not hunt, 
yet who are deeply interested in game protection. 
The way the means can be obtained is to license all 
hunters, both resident and nonresident. This system 
is not simply to protect the game, but mainly to 
secure a sufficient sum of money with which the game 
warden and his deputies may be enabled to enforce 
more vigorously the laws. 

The following data shows the amount of money 
raised by the license system in some of the states for 
the year 1903: Colorado, $15,184; Nebraska, 937-14; 
North and South Dakota, $8b\S(); Illinois, $95,000; 
Michie-an, $14,295.75; Wisconsin, $78,164; Idaho, 
$12,370; Washington, $14,982. 

Among many laymen not familiar with field trials it 
is the belief that quail are wantonly killed, such is not 
the practice nor is it a necessary condition of the 

sport. 

In field trials the gun is not used to kill the birds 
when they are flushed, retrieving is not in the curri- 
culum of a field trial dog's course of education. Ihe 
gun, however, is used with a blank cartridge, and 
when aimed and fired at a flying bird it is done for the 
purpose of testing the dog's steadiness "to shot, "as 
it is termed. 



Now and then, in my wanderings through the Blue 
Mountain forest, I come upon a gigantic blackish- 
brown deer, which, by reason of the great length of 
its yellowish-gray legs.stands higherthan a tall horse. 
It is clotned in coarse, bristly hai", longest on the 
neck and shoulders, and it has a rather ugly, over- 
hanging nose, which distinguishes it at once from all 
other kinds of deer writes Ernest Harold Baynes. 
From the throat of the male hangs a long hair- 
covered appendage known as the "bell, " and in the 
fall and winter he has also a pair of wide-spreading 
antlers, very heavy and much flattened or"palmated." 
He stalks the forest through undergrowth and over 
fallen trunks, like a king of giants,' or, if alarmed, he 
speeds away at an amazing swift swinging trot, and 
with a crasning which resembles the sound of falling 
trees. Such is the moose, the largest of all deer, liv- 
ing orextinct. 

The moose is chiefly an animal of the northern 
woods, thesouthern limit of the range beiDg the head 
of Green river, Wyoming. It is also found in northern 
Maine, New Brunswick, southern Canada, Idaho 
British Columbia, Alberta, Athabasca, Yukon and 
Alaska. It is strictly a dweller of the forest, seldem 
venturing to treeless plains. 

It lives for the most part by browsing on the leaves, 
twigs and bark of trees, particularly y oung tree6 In 
order to reach the tops of tall saplings, the. mcote 
rears up against them, straddling ttieni with his long 
legs, and literally riding the m down. He is fondest of 
birch, hemlock, alder, aspen, willow and maple. He 
also eats mosses and lichens, but his legs are to long 
that when he wishes to eat from the ground be is 
obliged to kneel. In summer he frequents the shores 
of quiet, tree-bordered lakes and streams, where he 
eats the lily-pads, and splashes himself with water, 
pos:ibly to keep off the Hies. 

In May, the "cow, " as the female moose is called, 
gives birth to a long-legged, ungainly, tawny-colored 
calf, to protect which the mother will fight any wood- 
land creature to the death. She has no antlers, but 
she can use her great sharp hoofs with the skill of 
a prize fighter, and has been known to pound to death 
a large black bear, and fairly trample his body into 
the ground. 

The calf stays with his mother for two or three 
years, or until he wanders off to seek a mate for him- 
self. One day last summer I came suddenly upon a 
cow moose, standing knee deep in a shallow pocd, 
while from beneath her neck her grotesque-looking 
calf peered out at me with eyes wide open, as if with 
astonishment. I hurried home and returned with a 
camera, but when I reached the spot they were gone 

Like all American deer, the "bull" moore sheds and 
renews his antlers every year. They become full- 
grown, hard and sharp, aDout the 1st of October, the 
beginning of the breeding season. At this time of 
year, the bulls are very savage, and not only fight 
furiously among themselves, but are apt to attack 
anything or anybody who comes in their way. 

The call of the ' bull" is a long-drawn bawl, with 
several loud grunts at the end If there is a cow with- 
in hearing, she will answer with a low cry. and the 
"bull" will come forward to meet her. Hunters often 
take advantage of this fact, and attract the "bull" by 
an imitation of the call of the cow, executed on a cone- 
shaped horn made of birch bark. Lying concealed 
on the bank of a lake or stream, they give out the 
call, and when the bull comes within range they shoot 
him. But as this trick is usually played at night, 
and as the bull sometimes gives no warning of his 
coming until he is almost on the spot, the sport is apt 
to re dangerous. The bull, at such a time, is in no 
mood to be trifled with, and unless the hunter is cool 
headed and a good shot, the moose is not only willing, 
but very able to kill him, and a dozen like him, if 
they happen to be on the spot. 

Probably the largest moose of which there is reliable 
record was shot by Carl Rungius, the animal painter, 
in New Brunswick in 1901. This great beast stood 
seven feet high at the shoulders, and the length of 
its head and body together was nine feet seven inches. 
The Alaskan moose have the largest antlers, and one 
pair from an animal shot on the Kenai peninsula has 
a spread of 78J inches, and has 34 points. With the 
dry skull to whish they are attached, these antlers 
weigh 93} pounds a weight which nothing but an 
animal of gigantic strength could carry at top speed 
over the roughestground and through thickly wooded 
country. 

In the winter, when the snow is deep, the moose, 
sometimes several families together, will gather in a 
certain section or woodland, and breaking out paths 
for themselves over a space of perhaps several a?res, 
form what is known as a "yard, " where, if not dis- 
turbed, they may stay for weeks together. But the 
moose is able to travel well at all s?asons, and even in 
deep snow his long legs enable him to move at a pace 
which will astonish any hunter who tries to run him 
down on snow-shoes. 

A wild, free life is the only one in which a moose 
can live and thrive. In captivity it is much less Der- 
vous than most deer, and is disposed to be gentle and 
even affectionate. But as a rule it will live but a short 
time, even though it gets the same food which it had 
in his native woods This is one of the noblest wild 
animals in the world, and it should be given adequate 
protection throughout its range. 



IT 18 WORTH GETTING. 

The English Stock- Keeper's Christmas edition is a 
number that we must recommend for the attention of 
fanciers. It is, as usual, full of good things — articles 
by well-known writers about various breeds and on 
timely topics, portraits of prominent breeders and 
fanciers and pictures of a "whole raft" of crack dogs. 
The "feather" part of the number is also a most 
readable and interesting feature. 



January 7, 1905J 



9 



Talks to Dog Owners. 



EXERCISING. 

This subject comprises a detail of management with- 
out attention to which no d"g owner or breeder can 
hope to be successful. No matter how well a dog may 
be fed, how elaborate his kennel may be, or how 
numerous are the comforts provided him, he will 
never be the animal he might have been if a proper 
amount of exercise is denied him. No doubt some 
breeds, and occasionally individual members of the 
same variety, will flourish upon less exercise than 
others will, but all dogs require a certain amount, 
and this is an impregnable fact which all beginners 
should remember when selecting a breed, else they 
will most assuredly regret their neglect of these words 
of advice. 

EXERCISING BIG DOGS. 

The varieties of large dogs demand in all probability 
more attention in tho way of exercise than the medium 
weight and smaller breeds; and for the simple reason 
that unless their limbs are strengthened so that they 
can support the weight of the huge bodies they have 
to carry, the ankles and hocks give way, and the feet 
become splayed and unsightly. Good sensible feeding', 
of course, goes a very long way in contributing 
towards the strength of the limbs, but adequate ex- 
ercise is simply indispensable, and it should take the 
form of long walks at a moderate pace. Big dogs will 
not as a rule, gambol about and enjoy themselves after 
the manner of a Terrier; and oven if some do so, it is 
the long slow drag that lays the muscle on and addi 
strength to the limbs and joints. At the same time 
there is no wisdom in tiring a dog out day after day 
by taking him a grind that it is beyond his strength 
to accomplish without being knocked up. An hour or 
8 o four days a week, a longer period on the other two 
week days, and a rest in the kennel yard or paddock 
on Sunday will keep any dog fit; but this is the al- 
owance for adults. Growing puppies require less at 
la time at all events, and a couple of half-hours on the 
roads will usually suffice to help them along; but, of 
course, circumstances alter cases. It is most desirable 
that the walks should be on the road, and not on grass, 
as the former kind of exercise hardens the soles of the 
feet and helps to keep them in shape if the work is 
slow. On the other hand, if it is too fast, the feet get 
knocked about, and the concussion renders the ani- 
mals liable to develop splints, as in the case of a horse, 
this being an undoubted fact of which possibly every 
dog owner may not be aware. 

EXERCISING MEDIUM-SIZED DOGS. 

The smaller varieties, such as Collies and, of course, 
Terriers, all benefit by work on the road, but it may 
be faster, and so when the animals are old enough 
they can be allowed to follow a trap or cycle, but it is 
as bad for them as it is cruel to bring them aloDg for 
several miles at top speed. Still more reprehensible is 
the practice, adopted by some unthinking people, of 
fastening their unfortunate dogs to the axle of a 
vehicle, beneath which they are compelled to travel 
long distances in a cloud of dust or over rough stones 
without an opportunity for relieving the wants of 
nature This is not exercising dogs, but sheer bar- 
barity on the part of their owners; but happily this 
practice is now less common than it used to be, prob- 
ably because the management of dogs is better under- 
stood. 

A very effective way of making the active varieties 
to take exercise is to teach them to run after a ball; 
and by this means anybody can persuade his dog to 
run miles in a small yard in the course of half an hour. 
The way to begin is to get a second person to help 
you, and by throwing the ball from one to another, 
the dog will usually soon acquire a desire to partici- 
pate in the fun and learn to retrieve the object, after 
which the work is a one-handed task. 

Some people, when they keep game Terriers,succeed 
in inducing the animals to take a great deal of exer- 
cise by hanging up a rat in a wiro trap just beyond 
his reach, and the animal will devote hours, if allowed 
to do so, jumping up in his efforts to reach the vermin. 
Even a cat's skin suspended at the end of the pole will 
accomplish, in the case of some Terriers, similar 
results; but precautions should be taken to prevent 
this jumping exercise being continued for too long a 
time, else the dogs will become discouraged by their 
want of success and decline the exercise another time. 

GENERAL RULES FOR EXERCISING. 

It is never a wise thing to allow dogs to stand or 
lie about in the cold if they come back to kennel over- 
heated. Very likely they can do so upon many 
occasions with impunity, but the day may come when 
a valuable animal contracts a chill on the eve of a 
show, and then regrets are useless. It is also a very 
bad thing to send dogs back straight to their sleeping 
quarters whilst they are wet, and consequently they 
should be, at all events, partially dried with towels if 
they have been out in the rain. It is always most de- 
sirable, likewise, to examine the feet thoroughly, in 
order to satisfy oneself that they have not been cut 
by glass or a piece of sharp stone, or that a thorn has 
not lodged itself in the pad or between the toes. Pre- 
cautions of this kind may perhaps appear absurd, but 
accidents will happen, and it is therefore worth while 
taking a little trouble rather than run the risk of 
having a good dog laid by for weeks at a time when 
he may be wanted. The advantages derived from a 
run id a meadow at night directly after feeding have 
already been referred to, but this final scamper is so 
thoroughly enjoyed, and entails so little trouble that 
when the weather permits it ought not to be denied 
the occupants of a well regulated kennel, whose 
master desires to do his best for his dogs. 



TRIMMING. 

Unfortunately for the good name of the dog world, 
the gentle art of illegitimately improving tho appear 
ance of dogs is largely practiced by members of both 
the exhibiting and non-exhibiting communities. Some 
of the ''improvements" to which the animals are 
subjected are unquestionably of a most reprehensible 
character, whilst others, though prohibited by the 
letter of the laws which govern dog shows, are by 
comparison quite trivial offencts. Still, the very 
mildest form of improvement is calculated to mislead 
the uiuitiated, and consequently would-be purchasers 
not blessed bv much experience should use every en- 
deavor to discover if any trimming has been resorted 
to before they conclude a bargain with a stranger of 
whom they know nothing. At the same time it is a 
subject of very great regret to many practical dog 
owners that the framers of the anti trimming regu- 
lations used no effect to classify the offences in such a 
way that the importanoe of each would be realized by 
the public. For instance, no reasonable man could 
possibly regard as equally objectionable malpractices 
the dyeing of a dog's coat ana the rubbing of a few 
drops of oil on the jacket; yet both operations are dis- 
allowsd by the laws of dog shows, and each is liable 
to be visited by the severest penalties. 

Amongst the common offences in the dyeing line is 
the disguising of superfluous hairs by the application 
of walnut juice or other coloring matter the shade of 
which assimilates with that of the coat. Red-colored 
dogs, such as Irish Terriers, are bathed in water 
which is tinged with permanganate of potash in order 
to produce the tint desired ; objectionable tan hairs 
in black and tan Terriers are concealed beneath a 
coating of lunar caustic; and in the case of toy breeds 
the art of the illicit animal painter is practiced freely. 
Such practices cannot be too strongly condemned; 
and on the face of it, it is absured to regard the ap- 
plication of a few d rops of brilliantine or oil to the 
hair of a long-coated dog as a serious offense. The 
coats of dogs, just as the hair of human beings, are 
apt to become dry and dull at times, and if neglected 
will become completely out of order, and yet if we are 
to follow the laws of dog shows implicity, the owner 
who takes such a simple precaution is as culpable as 
the man who willfully stains the jacket of his dog. — 
Enqliah Stock-Keeper. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



CHAMPION MEDAL, RECE1V1D 

Mrs. C. G Saxe has received the handsome A. K. C. 
champion medal for the harlequin bitch Princess 
Harlequin. Princess showed style and quality from 
puppy class clear down the line. 



DELEGATE TO A. K. C. 

Mr. W. W. Stettheimer of this city has been elected 
a delegate to the American Kennel Club to represent 
the San Mateo Kennel Club. 

Mr. Stettheimer is an enthusiastic fancier and has a 
penchant for Fox Terriers. The San Mateo Kennel 
Club is to be congratulated in having a "live one" to 
look after its interests at headquarters. 



GLEN TANA COLLIES. 

A letter received from Mr. Thos. S. Griffith states: 
"I see by the papers that the W. K. L. is a thing of 
the past. You see how very unlucky it has turned 
out for Marquis not going to Lcs Angeles as he had 
four winners to his credit and would have been a 
champion now, only for that unfortunate mix up. 

"After the Providence show I expect Glen Tana 
Bounder, Glen Tana Talent and Glen Tana Cracksman 
home. " 

We have not yet been advised that "the W. K. L. 
is a thing of the past." Efforts have been made, 
however, to bring about a coalition of Coast dogdom. 
Overtures tending that way were made to the Pacific 
Advisory Board as the Coast representative of the A. 
K. C. Concessions were asked for and delegates sug- 
gested on the Coastcommittee — the latter to be elected 
by clubs represented. So far, the matter is still under 
consideration. 

The "unfortunate mix up" above referred to was 
the direct cause for the disqualification of handler 
Bradshaw. 

Glen Tana Marquis was in stud at Bradshaw's 
kennels for a brief time, a period during which the 
kennels were advertised as under the ownership of a 
former employee of Bradshaw's. Neither Marquis 
nor the youth temporarily in charge of the kennels 
are now there. 



SOMETHING GOOD IN BOLLS. 

W. H. Papst took his clever bitch True Blue down 
to Wandee Kennels this ween to be served by Ivel 
Damon. 

A litter by Damon turned out so well that the 
daughterof Ch Ivel Rustic will bo bred to the Wandee 
stud dog again. 

A STANDARD REMEDY. 

Veterinary Pixine we can recommend for skin 
ailments, Incised or lascerated wounds. It is a pene- 
trating, stimulating, soothing, nutritive, absorbing, 
antiseptic, healiDg ointment, produces the most 
effective and speedy results on all chronic and acute 
Inflammatory sores and skin affections. Contains no 
poisonous, harsh, gritty or mineral substance. 

It is in combining and manipulating together the 
purest and most potent animal and vegetable drugs 
known that makes this the most effective healing 
ointment on the market. Has greater penetrating 
power than any other ointment. Heals from boneath 
the surface by disinfecting the parts, subduing inflam- 
mation and stimulating healthy granulaJons; not by 
drying up and scabbing as do many other veterinary 
preparations. Sample boxes can be obtained at the 
office of the Breeder and Sportsman. 



HIS MASTER'S VOICE. 

A dog worth $.15,000 has been on exhibition this 
week in the show window of a local music store. The 
dog is an effigy in pure gold and represents the trade 
mark of The Victor Talking Machine Company— the 
picture is a familiar one in this country, a Fox Terrier 
listening to the sounds emanating from a talking 
machine. 

The incident which led to the adoption of the 
picture as aD advertising medium was recounted to us 
as follows: 

Bob Gavan, a Sacramento sporting man, prior to a 
trip to Alaska several years ago, had been given a 
Fox Terrier puppy by a friend. He thought much of 
the dog, for the puppy was very intelligent and finally 
became a close pal to his master who took the dog 
with him to the Artie gold country. Gavan finally 
located in Skaguay, so our informant stated, and con- 
ducted a resort for the entertainment of visitors who 
were thirsty or who felt inclined to woo the fickle 
goddess. A ' talking machine" was placed at one 
end of the bar counter. This instrument was kept 
goiDg much of the time, greatly to the entertain- 
ment and, in some instances, wonderment of many 
visitors who were never tired of listening to the latest 
popular songs, etc., fuDny stories (?) and sayings 
ground out by the machine. 

The dog was as much interested apparently as any 
one else, for whenever the machine was started he 
would jump up on the counter and locate in front of 
the trumpet-mouth just as he is sho ;vn in the picture. 
"His master's voice" was not a myth, for one of the 
discs had the record, and for his special benefit, of tho 
well known voice of his chum and owner. 

So interesting and amusing were the dog's actions 
that in due course he became the animate and verv 
popular dual attraction whenever the machine was 
turned loose. 

A correspondent foran Eastern magazine happening 
in the resort one day, brought his camera into play 
with the result now so well known throughout the 
country. 

The picture was a hit from the start, to Terrier 
fanciers it appeals strongly, as a trait of the breed but 
not for type. 

The antithesis of the "hit" is f hown by an irrever- 
ent cartoonist who drew the dog in his familiar 
attitude surveying an overturned, empty decanter 
and labelled the episode "His masters breath." 

The Alaskan story Is ciedited to Mr. Faxon Riordan, 
Deputy Assistant Engineer of the Construction 
Department of the Santa Fe Road. 



WESTMINSTER KENNEL CLUB PREMIUM LIST. 

The premium list of the Westminster Kenne! Club's 
twenty-ninth annual dog show which is now ready for 
mailing contains 439 classes and provides for the fol- 
lowing breeds: 

Bloodhounds, 7 classes, 1 winners, 1 American-bred 
class; Mastiffs, 1 class; St. Bernards, 16 classes, 3 
winners; Great Danes, 13 classes, 2 winners; New- 
foundlands, 1 class; Deerhounds, 2 classes; Russian 
Wolfhounds, 12 classes, 2 winners, 2 American-bred; 
Russian Sheep Dogs, 1 class; Greyhounds, 5 classes, 1 
winner; Foxhounds, 9 classes, 2 dinners; Pointers, 15 
classes, 2 winners, 1 field trial class; English Setters, 
14 classes, 2 field trial, 2 American-bred, 2 winners 
classes; Irish Setters, 10 classes, 2 winners; Gordon 
Settsrs, 9 classes, 2 winners; Chesapeake Bay Dogs, 1 
class; Retrievers, 1 class; Irish Water Spaniels, 1 
class, Clumber Spaniels, 5 classep, 1 winners; Field 
Spaniels, 10 classes, 2 winners; Cocker Spaniels, 22 
classes, 4 winners; Collies (rough), 17 classes. 2 
winners, 2 American-bred, 2 breeders' classes; Col- 
lies (smooth), 4 classes, 1 winners; Old English 
Sheep Dogs, 7 classes, 1 winners, 1 American-bred; 
Dalmatians, 6 classes, 1 winners; Chow Chows, 4 
classep, 1 winners; Poodles, 7 classes, 1 winners; 
Bulldogs, 18 classes, 2 winners, 2 American-bred, 2 
breeders'; French Bulldogs, 14 classes, 2 winners, 2 
American -bred; Bull Terriers, 18 classes, 2 winners, 2 
American bred ; Airedale Terriers, 14 classes, 2 win 
ners, 2 American bred, 2 breeders; Boston Terriers, 
10 classes, 2 winners; Basset Hounds, 5 classes, 1 win- 
ners; Beagles, 16 classes, 2 winners, 1 field trial; 
Dachshunde, 11 classes, Z winners; Fox Terriers, 24 
classes, 4 winners, 4 American bred; Irish Terriers, 
12 classes 2 winners, 2 American bred ; Scottish Ter- 
riers, 11 classes, 2 winners, 1 American bred; Welsh 
Terriers, 7 classes, 1 winners 1 American bred; Black 
and Tan tManchesteOiTerriers, 5 classes, 1 winners; 
Dandy Dinmonts, 1 class; Bedlingtons, 1 class; Whip- 
pets, 4 classes, 1 dinners; Schipperkes, 1 class; Pugs, 
7 classee, 1 winners; Toy Poodles, 1 class; Yorkshire 
Terriers, 1 class; Maltese Terriers, 1 class; Toy Ter- 
riers, 1 class,; Pomeranians, 9 classes, 1 winners; Toy 
Spaniels, f0 classes, 7 winners; Griffons Bruxellole, 1 
class; Miscellaneous, 1 class. 

In addition tho following variety classes are given: 
Champion dogs any breed; champion bitches any 
breed ; open dogs, any breed except Toys, champions 
barred ; open bitches, any breed except Toys; cham- 
pions barred; novice dogs and bitches, any breed; 
breeders' class, dogs and bitches bred by exhibitor; 
Toys, any breed; brace class, two of any one breed; 
team class, four of any one breed. 

The list of special prizes donated by the different 
specialty clubs; members of the Westminister Ken- 
tucky club and friends of the club represents a large 
number of valuable cups which are to be won outright 
at this show. 

The judges selected are as follows: 

Mr. Dudley E. Waters, Grand Rapids, Mich.— St. 
Bernards. 

Mr. C. H. Mantlor, New York, N. Y.— Great Danes. 
Dr. J. E. DeMund, Brooklyn, N. Y.— Russian Wolf- 
hounds. 

Mr. A. H Ball, New York, N. Y. — Pointers. 

Mr. Wm. Tallman, Brooklyn, N. Y —English and 
Gordon Setters i nd Chesapeake Bay Dogs. 

Dr. Wm. Jarvis, Claremont, N. H. — Irish Letters. 

Dr. Heffinger, Portsmouth, N, H. — American Fox- 
hounds. 



10 



<&tiv gvgebcv cm£» Sportsman 



(.January 7, 1905 



Dr. Henry Jarrett, Chestnut Hill, Pa.— Sporting 
Spaniels and Collies 

Mr. W. C. Codman, Providence, R. I.— Bulldogs 
and French Bulldogs. , ,. 

Mr Henry G.Trevor, New York, N. Y. -Poodles. 

Mr H D Rilev, Strafford, Pa.— Boston Terriers. 

Mr. A. J. Purinton, Palmer, Mass.— Beagles. 

Mr. Joseph Graefle, New York, N. Y.— Daschs- 

h Mr 8 .E. N. Barker, New York, N. Y.— Dalmatians. 
Mr. O. W. Donner, New York, N. Y.— Irish Ter- 

rU Mr. George Raper, Gomersal, England— Mastiffs, 
Newfoundlands, Russian Sheep Dogs, Greyhounds, 
English Foxhounds, Retrievers, Chow Chows, Bull 
Terriere, Schipperkes, Griffons Bruxellois, unclassi- 
fied specials and variety classes. 

Mr Arthur Maxwell, Eastbourne, England- 
Bloodhounds, Deerhounds, Airedale Terriers, Fox 
Terriers, Scottish Terriers, Welsh Terriers, Black 
and Tan (Manchester) Terriers, Dandle Dinmont 
Terriers, Bedlington Terriers, Whippets.Pomeranians 
and Miscellaneous class. 

Mr. R. F. Mayhew, Clifton, L. L, N. Y.— Old 
English Sheep Dogs, Pugs, English Toy Spaniels, 
Japanese Spaniels, Yorkshire Terriers, Maltese Ter- 
riers, Toy Terriers (other than Yorkshire or Maltese.; 

The Ladies' Kennel Association of America, Ladies 
Kennel Association of Massachusetts, The Englewood 
Kennel Club, The Bloodhound Club, St. Bernard, 
Great Dane, Russian Wolfhound, Pointer, Irish 
Setter, American Spaniel, Spaniel Breeders' Society, 
Collie Club, Old English Sheep Dog Club, Dalmatian, 
Bulldog, French Bulldog, Bull Terrier, Airedale Ter- 
rier, Boston Terrier, National Beagle, Dachshund, 
Fox Terrier, Irish Terrier, Scottish Terrier, Welsh 
Terrier, Pomeranians, Toy Spaniel and Japanese 
Spaniel Clubs have all contributed most liberally and 
there is every indication that Madison Square Garden 
will hold a larger show of dogs on February 13, 14, 15 
and 16, 1905, than it has ever known in ios history. 

Entries close January 25th and applications for 
premium lists should bernade to Jas. Mortimer, Supt., 
Room 1005, Townsend Building, 1123 Broadway, New 
York. 

COAST FIELD TRIALS. 

The Pacific Coast Field Trials Club's twenty -second 
annual trials will begin near Bakersfield on Monday 
morning. The Derby will be the first stake followed 
by the All-Age, Members, and Champion stakes. H. L. 
Betten will officiate in the saddle. For each of three 
stakes there will be three elegant prizes— first, second 
and third choice to the winner in the order of wins. 
The beautiful Champion cup must be won twice to 
ensure permanent ownership. The trophy was 
originally donated by Will S. Tevis who won it and 
graciously re donated the cup for competition again 
in the stake. Hon W. E. Gerber of Sacramento has 
donated a handsome cup for the winner of second 
place in this event. 

Conditions are reported to be most favorable for a 
good meeting. The class of the Derby dogs is assur- 
ing for a grand showing. The All- Age is full of vim 
and quality. The attendance of club members and 
visiting sportsmen anticipated will be an encouraging 
recognition of the club's efforts in fostering the sport. 

Secretary Albert Betz will represent the Breeder 
and Sportsman at the trials a full report of which 
will appear in due course. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



EMPIRE GUN CLUB. 

Secretary J. B. Hauer reports that at the regular 
monthly meeting of the Empire Gun Club held Wed- 
nesday night the following officers were elected to 
serve for the ensuing year: President, James P. 
Sweeney; vice-president, Dr. George G. Gere; secre- 
tary-treasurer, J. B. Hauer; captain, A. J. Webb; 
lieutenant, W. O Cullen; sergeant it arms, C. A. 
Bennett. Every officer of the club was re-elected, 
which speaks in a gratifying manner of the esteem in 
which they are held by the large membership and the 
appreciation of the various duties performed by each 
official. The same committeemen were named liy 
President Sweeney as are at present handling the 
club's affairs, namely: Executive committee — Dr. 
George G. Gere, J. B. Hauer, F. B.. Judah, J. Peltier, 
Con Roman. 

The club's finances were reported in excellent con- 
dition. The initiatory fee was raised to $200, begin- 
ning July 1st, next. Besides enjoying great prosper- 
ity, the club boasts of having a full membership and 
a long waiting list. 

AN UNFORTUNATE ACCIDENT. 

On Tuesday evening last near Collinsville a serious 
accident occurred which for the time being jeopardized 
the lives of six people. The unfortunate mishap was 
due to the carelessness and stupidity of a rancher 
who was regularly employed to drive the Montezuma 
and Black Jack Gun Club members and guests to their 
respective club houses when they visited their shoot 
Ing grounds for a duck hunt. The route from Collins- 
ville to the club houses i6 over an adobe road that in 
several places is steep, has abrupt turns, or deep banks 
on the outer side of a grading, making it a dangerous 
driveway in the dark. The party in the venicle were 
Mr. and Mrs. W. AV. Richards, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. 
Walsh, J. G. Ferguson, all of this city and O'Neal the 
driver. 

Storting from the Collinsville wharf in the dark, 
Richards protested against the drive without a 
lantern. O'NeaMnsisted that he knew the road and 
he could get safely to their destination. With some 
misgiving and after further insistence upon getting a 
lantern the team drove on safely and speedily, until 
arriving at a part of the road where the bank shelved 
steeply three or four feet on one side, here the horses 
left the driveway in the black darkness, with the 
result that the wagon was tipped over the bank and 
the unlucky occupants spilled out. The ladies were 



both badly bruised. Mr. Richards escaped luckily 
from getting injured. Mr. Walsh sustained a severe 
fracture of the left arm and contusions of the face 
while Mr. Ferguson, who is an older man was found to 
be seiiously injured internally. 

Medical aid was hastily summoned from Rio Vista, 
the physician arriving several hours after the acci- 
dent. Next day the party came back to this city on 
the first down boat. Mr. Ferguson is now in a hospi- 
tal and will probably be laid up for some time. Mr. 
Walsh is getting along comfortably. The ladies, 
though severely jarred and bruised, will soon be all 
right again. Mr. Richards is to be congratulated 
upon his narrow escape from painful injury. The 
carelessness and obstinacy of the driver cannot be too 
severely condemned. 

A VETERAN SPORTSMAN GONE. 

In the passing away of Hon. Thos. J Sherwood at 
Marysville, on December 226% the sportsmen of this 
State have lost a staunch advocate and active worker 
in the interest of fish and game protection. Mr. 
Sherwood, years ago, recognizing the necessity of 
prompt action, introduced the first game law that was 
enacted in California. He took a prominent patt in 
all deliberations of the California State Sportsmen's 
Association and was deeply interested In the revision 
of State laws affecting the protection of game. Besides 
being a most loyal friend and genial comrade he was 
also an exceptionally liberal man and performed many 
kindly and charitable acts for old pioneer friends of 
Northern California. 

For fourteen years he was the editor and proprietor 
of the Marysville Evening Democrat and had sinco 
1860 filled many public offices of trust and responsi- 
bility with honor to himself and benefit to his con- 
stituents. He was a native of New York state and 
had resided in Marysville since 1858, being 70 years of 
age at the time of his demise. 



GAME BIRD IMPORTATION. 

A special investigation made by the Department of 
Agriculture on the workings of the Lacey Act shows 
that the game birds imported into the United States 
under the permits granted under the act number 
almost 24,000. There were about 4000 pheasants, al- 
most 17,000 quail, 750 partridge, 1473 ducks and geese 
and 477 miscellaneous birds. 

The pheasants came chiefly from Canada and Bel- 
gium, the quail from China, partridges from Ger- 
many. England furnished pheasants and a few 
partridges. China and Japan sent pheasants and 
water-fowl. 

The pheasants were chiefly the Mongolian and Eng- 
lish, and were imported for game preserves. The 
partridges were nearly all the gray partridge of 
Europe. Among the duck and geese were mandarin 
and wood d ucks. About 230 swans and 65 capercailzie 
were brought in also. 

Six importations of the eggs of game birds were 
made and about 2000 eggs were set under pheasants 
and partridges here and hatched. The results of 
attempts with eggs were highly unfavorable in 1903 
because the severe weather weakened the young birds 
excessively where it did not kill them outright; and 
the scarcity of food that followed finished almost all 
the yearlings that managed to survive the bad 
weather. 

Breeders do not feel discouraged, however, be- 
cause they all realize that 1903 did not offer a fair 
season for a test. This method of propagating game 
birds is successful in most countries and, no doubt, 
will prove equally so here. It is, of course, vastly 
more economical than the method of importing grown 
birds and turning them loose. Foi'every dozen adult 
birds thus liberated a couple of hundred birds can be 
produced by using the eggs. 

The ring-necked pheasant has done so well In 
Oregon that it is announced officially that the bird 
has become acclimated and is now to be viewed as a 
reliable part of the game of the State. Unfortunately, 
the method of raising pheasants in other states has 
been so costly that most of them have stopped it. 
Thus, Ohio appropriated $9000 between 1900 and 1902 
for this work and distributed 3919 eggs and 6575 
pheasants. In 1902 the appropriation ran out, and 
since then nothing more has been done. 



TWO WEAPONS IN ONE. 

A recent invention, consisting of an elongated tube, 
having the rear extremity enlarged and shaped to 
conform to the contour of "the rear extremity of the 
barrel into which it is fitted, makes it possible for 
hunters to have both a rifle and shotgun in the one 
weapon at considerable less expense than two distinct 
guns would cost. The rear enlarged extremity of the 
rifle-tube terminates in a rear circumferential flange 
which is slipped into the cartridge-ring recess in the 
rear end of the barrel, and to sustain the tube in tight 
frictional engagement with the barrel one or more 



springs are used and secured to the rear extremity of 
the tube. 

Proper provisions are made for the operation of the 
shell extractor and other parts of the gun. 

In the double-barrel shotgun the rifle-tube attach- 
ment may be inserted and remain in one of the barrels 
and ready for instant use, while the remaining barrel 
will be left free for service in 'discharging shells con- 
taining shot. In single-barrel shotguns the rifle-tube 
attachment may be applied when found desirable. 



SMALL BORKS BECOMING FAVORITES 

Duck hunters of experience have marveled more 
than a little at the "small-bore craze' ' which now bids 
fair to run the same course in shotguns that has 
already been traversed in rifled arms. 

At a period not so remote but that it is still fresh in 
the memory of every veteran of the scattergun, the 
ten-bore was universally conceded to be as light a 
weapon as was compatible with success in duck shoot- 
ing and not a few hunters clung to the double eight 
bore as the arm par excellence for this exacting branch 
of sport. 

There were more ducks in those days than now, and 
the birds were less difficult to get because being more 
plenty they were not hunted down as closely as in the 
last decade. Therefore a respectable bag required 
less of a gun and its pointer than in the present times 
of comparative duck scarcity, yet the sportsman of 
today is killing his birds with a smaller, and presum- 
ably less powerful arm than formerly. Whether the 
difference is more imaginary than real, only the men 
who have used both large and small-bor e guns are 
prepared to point out, and the majority of theui affirm 
that the little pieces, though they require closer hold- 
ing, kill as far as any. 

The transition from the eight and ten-bore duck 
guns to the twelve gauge has already been experienced, 
and it is so marked that in all probability not a dtzen 
good hammerless ten bores could bo bought new in 
this city today, the demand being entirely for a 
smaller arm. In fact, a twelve gauge of a certain 
grade is worth just double what a ten bore of the 
same face value will bring. 

American sportsmen are world-famed for their 
enterprise as well as for their antipathy to a conserva- 
tive course in their amusements. Fads are constantly 
coming and going, and many believe the present rage 
for sixteen and twenty bores will run the usualcourse, 
but there ars so many sound reasons In their favor 
that converts are being made every month, and so 
long as this remains the case, the small guns will stand 
high in publicfavor. 

Many who use the small bores on quail regularly 
have not yet learned their power in duck shooting. 
The salient features of a sixteen gauge's work on a 
duck marsh are its surprising range and the uniform 
cleanness with which it either kills the birds or misses 
them entirely. It would appear that the entire 
charge has killing force, as there are fewer body-shot 
birds dropping hundreds of yards away than are lost 
with a twelve. A gunner must be more careful in his 
aim as he has loss shot-spread to fall hack upon than 
with a twelve, though after all the difference is not as 
great as many imagine. Most users of sixteens shoot 
an ounce of shot at ducks, and back it with a propor- 
tionate load of dense or bulk smokeless powders, Du 
I'ont, "Infallible," -'E. C", Schultze and C. 
P. W. being the favorites Users of twelve bores 
realize that ducks to be killed clean must be "cen- 
tered'" by the charge, and those able to do clean work 
with the larger gun may rest assured that they will 
get corresponding results with the sixteens, have less 
metal to carry, and a lighter load of 6hells. 

Many maintain the sixteen bore is«'quicker" than 
a twelve. The truth of this probably is that the gun 
is lighter, and therefore easier to swing well before 
passing birds. Some shooters complain o a tendency 
to' overlead on this account but sucb a fault is readily 
remedied; it is never common in ducking. 

Just how far the small bore craze will go it will be 
interesting to note. In England twenty, twenty-four 
and even twenty eight bores are much used by the 
wealthy sportsmen, but these guns are hardly likely 
to become popular where the conditions of shooting 
are as difficult as in this country. Here there are no 
beaters to drive partridges over hedges within thirty 
yards distance. For some uses the twenty bores give 
good satisfaction, particularly on quail. 



No More Available. 



So great has been the demand for the Laflin & 
Rand Powder Company's 1905 calendars that the edi- 
tion has already been exhausted, so we are authorized 
to inform our readers. 



Jackson's Napa Soda is sold in every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 




ThU Shows What the Combination of a Winchester Can and Winchester Leader Shells 
will do In efficient hands, as proved by Mr E. F. Confarr of Livingston, Mont. 



January 7, 1905, 



11 



THE FARM. 



Teeth of Animals. 



At the Smithfield and Birmingham 
shows the following rules govern the 
judgment of the age of animals : 

Cattle having their central permanent 
incisors cut will be considered as exceed- 
ing one year and nine mouths. 

Cattle having their central permanent 
incisors fully up will be considered as 
exceeding one year and nine months. 

Cattle having their second pair of per- 
manent incisors fully up will be consid- 
ered as exceeding two years and three 
months. 

Cattle having their third pair of per- 
manent incisors cut will be considered as 
exceeding two years and eight months. 

Cattle having their fourth pair (corner) 
permanent incisors fully up and their 
anterior molars showing signs of wear 
will be considered as exceeding three 
years. 

Sheep having their central permanent 
incisors cut will be considered as exceed- 
ing ten months. 

Sheep having their central permanent 
incisors fully up will be considered as ex- 
ceeding twelve months. 

Sheep having their third pair of per- 
manent incisors cut will be considered as 
exceeding nine montns. 

Sheep having their third pair of per- 
manent incisors fully up and the tempor- 
ary molars shed will be considered as ex- 
ceeding twenty-four months. 

Sheep having their corner permanent 
incisors well up and showing marks of 
wear will be considered as exceeding 
three years. 

Pigs having their corner permanent in- 
cisors cut will be considered as exceeding 
six months. 

Pigs having their permanent tusks more 
than half up will be considered as ex- 
ceeding nine months. 

Pigs having their central permanent in- 



cisors up and any oi the first three per- 
manent molars cut will be considered as 
exceeding twelve months. 

Pigs having their lateral temporary in- 
cisors shed and the permanents appearing 
will be considered as exceeding fifteen 
months. 

Pigs having their lateral permanent in- 
cisors fully up will be considered as ex- 
ceeding eighteen months. 



Feed of Brood Sows. 



Mexican Stock Inferior. 



Mexican cattle are of inferior grade/ 
and small. In American money the 
average value of Mexican cattle is $7.27 
per head. If they were of fair grade, it 
would pay to market them in the United 
States, even with the border duty added. 
Mexican sheep are worth relatively less. 
The average value of sheep is 80 cents 
per head, that of goats 78 cents and hogs 
$1.57 in our currency. That indicates 
both smallness in size, thinness in con- 
dition and general inferiority in quality. 
If this stock had any real merchantable 
condition it would pay to slaughter it in 
Mexico, pay the duty on the meat and 
ship the carcass across the border. As a 
matter of fact the animals are unsalable 
because of their grade and condition. 
The relatively few "bred up" stock are 
expensive in Mexico. 



It seems to be necessary to say again 
that it is a costly mistake to feed a sow 
liberally just before she is to farrow, and 
especially if she has a large udder and 
gives other indications of developing 
milk freely. And it is a fact that such 
feeding is more dangerous with older and 
large sows than with cows, for sulphur 
milk can be drawn from them as it can- 
not be from sows, and with the last milk 
fever and maybe pig eating will result. — 
Farm Stock and Home. 



The Milker. 



The milker should be clean in person 
sndways and perfectly healthy. If not 
he may throw off germs of disease in 
breathing or coughing, says Prairie 
Farmer. If his breath is contaminated 
with tobacco the milk cannot entirely es- 
cape contamination, and if hiB hands are 
soiled the milk must be dirty. 



Mutton Chops. 

Sulphur, or snuff, rubbed through'the 
fleece, will destroy ticks. 

The best single grain for breediog 
sheep is oats. Bran is also good for 
breeding ewes to stimulate them and 
produce strong lambs. 

Corn should be restricted to the fatten, 
ing flock, and then must be fed with a 
nitrogenous food such as clover hay. 

Timothy hay is not suited to the Deeds 
of the sheep; digestive disorders occur 
when timothy hay is fed, which often re- 
sult in the loss of the sheep. Clover and 
mixed hay may be fed to the flock with 
good results. 

A few neglected sheep will eat up the 
profit of several good ones. Get rid of 
the unprofitable ones and give the others 
good care. 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles th e 
feet. 



Dairy Maxims. 



Feed your cows twioe a day at regular 
intervals and have pure water and salt 
always accessible. 

A dairy cow does not need so much ex- 
ercise as a trotting horse. 

You do not need a dog to drive up dairy 
rattle. 

A cow with a good escutcheon and 
nothing else should be butchered. 

A cow likes a variety of food. Gratify 
her taste as often as you can. 



Competent men are extremely hard 
to find for the dairy. It demands a 
number of complications which not every 
man possesses. If he has them he is 
almost sure to be working for himself. 



The manger question for feeding cows 
is an extremely difficult one. We would 
be pleased to have suggestions from 
feeders. They should be so arranged as 
to be thoroughly cleaned. 

o 

Cows have their likes and dislikes, and 
when preparing a ration for cows the im- 
portance of palatability must not be over- 
looked. If they will not eat it, it will do 
them no good. 

o 

Theory is valuable, but a practical 
knowledge is far superior This is what 
every one needs, and many cannot afford 
to wait if they had the time to do so. 

Nothing is gained by letting a calf suck 
the cow, unless it is to be sold for veal. 
Then it seems to be fatter, sleeker and 
more attractive than when it is fed. 
o 

Cream cheese is nicely served by press- 
ing it into a mound and denting the top, 
to be filled with jelly or cranberries. 



FOR SALE. 



pRIGHT BAY MARE, BLACK POINTS. 16% 
■M hands, 5 years; city broke; guaranteed sound 
and gentle. By Prince Almont 2-.13H. clam Fanny 
C 2:28. Never trained but can show a 40 gait. 
Will be very fast if trained. 

O'Brien Bike Buggy (cost $325), $125; Moyer 
One-Man Bike Speed Buggy, weight 126 lbs. (cost 
$250), $150; Moyer Bike Road Cart (cost $125), $85. 

DALZIEL'S, 813 Golden Gate Ave. 



WANTED TO LEASE. 

McKINNEY STALLION FOR PUBLIC 
use, on shares or otherwise. Must be a pure 

gaited trotter and out of a good individual mare. 

This is a rare opportunity for a horse of merit to 

make a reputation. Address M. L. L., in care of 

Breeder and Sportsman. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 in One" 
on your razor strop till .,, 
leather becomes soft and /|J 
pliable ; draw razor blade j j 
, between thumb and finger JJL 
i moistened with "3 in One"; ill 
J £ then strop. The razor cuts '/ 
<• 5 times as easy and clean; 
holds the edge longer. "A 
" v Razor Saver for Every 
ICS* Shaver" which gives the 
scientific reasons, and a i 
•generous trial bottle scnt\ 
free. Write to-day. 
' G- W. COLE CO. 
i 2^ Washington tife Bldg^, 
New York. 




Loading Cavalry Horses on a U. S. Army Transport at San Francisco 



12 



[January 7. m5 



Cost of Feeding for Beef. 

What does it really cost to feed cattle, 
and is there a reasonable profit in the 
business? I will give my experience, 
and hope that some kind feeder will 
reciprocate. For our present purpose, no 
account is taken of interest on the money 
invested, the care of the Btock or the use 
of the yards. The expense for the last 
two items is fully covered by the benefits 
to the farm. Don't forget this item— the 
benefits to the farm. 

Last year I fed ninety-six steers an 
average of 8 1-5 months I had ninety- 
four shotes and raiBed 203 pigs. The corn- 
fed averaged 14 6 bushels for each steer 
per month, and the average gain was 
fifty-eight pounds per month net Chicago 
weights over weights paid for when the 
cattle were bought. The whole gain on 
the cattle was 45,600 pounds, and on the 
hogs 30,280 pounds. If we divide the corn 
fed between the hogs and cattle in the 
ratio of their gain-say nothing about the 
hay, pasture, fodder, etc.— we will have 
two-fifths of the corn fed to charge to the 
hogs, and of course three-fifths to the 
cattle. The whole gain of beef and pork 
averaged 0.6 pounds for each bushel of 
corn fed. The cost of each pound of gain, 
counting everything, was 5 8 cents, corn 
costing on an average thirty-four cent. 

Cattle made a gross profit of $4251.42. 
Hogs made a gross profit of $1863 79. So 
that on the basis of profits the division of 
the corn fed should be about as above 
stated. Whole profit on hogs and cattle, 
$6115.21. Whole cost of corn, hay fodder 
and pasture, $4411.70. Net profit for the 
year, $1603.51. The cattle were sold at 
about $1.90 over cost price and the hogs 
at $1 over invoice price. 

Two years ago I fed 135 steers an aver- 
age of 7.9 months. The corn fed averaged 
12 55 bushels for each steer per month. 
Net gain fifty-two pounds per month. 
Whole gain on the cattle was 55,390 
pounds, on the hogs 36,730 pounds. The 
average gain on the hogs was a little more 
than the first year given, leaving fully 
two-fifths of the corn fed to be charged to 
the hogs. The whole gain for each bushel 
of corn fed was 6 85 pounds. Net cost of 
each pound of gain 4 47 cents, corn costing 
twenty-eight cents The increaeed gain 
for the corn fed is accounted for, in part, 
at least bv the fact that this year's ac- 
count was opened August 16th and closed 
one year from the next December, thus 
giving two falls for feed — the best and 
cheapest time to feed any kind of stock. 
The low monthly gain is also due in part 
to the fact that most of these cattle were 
bought under a heavy shrink. And yet 
you will observe that a low monthly gain 
is not inconsistent with a cheap gain. 
These cattle made a gross profit of $3984.04 
and the hogs $1777.79, so that on this 
basis the division of corn fed should be 
about one-third to the hogs. 

Whole profit, gross, $5761.83, whole 
cost of corn, fodder, pasture, $4120.50; 
net profit for the year, $1641.33. 

The cattle sold at about $1 over cost 
price, and the hogs at about invoice 
price. 

Three years ago I fed fifty-two steers an 
average of 7.7 months. The corn fed 
averaged fourteen bushels per month 
each. Net gain tilty-nine pounds per 
month. Whole gain on cattle 23,720 
pounds, on hogs, 13 470 pounds. The 
gain on the hogs is not up to the average 
in the other two years ; the reason being 
that I was short of hogs all the earlier 
part of the year, and was afraid to buy on 
account of sickneBS. The whole gain for 
each bushel of corn fed was 6.6 pounds, 
the same as for the first year. Each 
pound o' gain cost 4.28 cents, corn, twenty- 
six cents. Gross profit on cattle, $2272. 23; 
on hogs, $034^3. Whole profit. $2806.56. 
Cost of all feed and extra labor, $1590.46. 
Net profit for the vear, $1216 10. Gain in 
price on cattle, $1.75 per hundred pounds; 
hogs about twenty-five cents per one 
hundred pounds. 



Breeding Draft Horses. 

Do not think you can raise a big colt 
from a large sire and dam unless you feed 
well while the colt is growing. He should 
be able to earn his board from the time he 
is three years old until ready for market. 
Excepting mares that are kept for breed- 
ing, a farmer should not keep his horses 
after they are five years old. I believe in 
raising horses to sell the same as cattle 
and hogs or sheep -as soon as they can 
be gotten ready for market. Good draft 
horses will pay well for their feed at any 
time between two and five years of age, 
and the farmer should always have a 
younger one to take the place of the one 
sold. We began breeding the draft horse 
in '90 and believe it has paid us about as 
well as anything we could have raised for 
the feed consumed. It costs but very 
little more to raise a good draft horse 
than it doee to raise and grow a steer and 
put him on the market fat I leave you 
farmers to decide which is the most profit- 
able sale. 

I believe the time is not far distant 
when good draft geldings in good con- 
dition will sell for as much as they ever 
did in this country. Feed for big ones, 
the larger the better, if they are finished 
up and topped out right. You cannot 
successfully breed or raise horses without 
exercising good judgment and having the 
subject thoroughly mastered Breeders 
who are successful are those who study 
and mark out a definite line to follow and 
then stick to it year after year. Any man 



The Feet of Horses. 



An English agricultural journal says 
that the nature of the soil on which 
horses are bred and reared has a certain 
influence on the shape and qaality of 
their hoofs. Horses bred in billy districts 
as a general rule possess comparatively 
upright and small, but very strong and 
tough feet, while the hoofs of horees 
reared on marshy and low lying land are 
of exactly the opposite character, being 
usually big, more or less flat or spreading 
and soft. 

There is, of course, a considerable 
amount of difference in the quality and 
shape of the feet of individual horses 
bred under exactly the same conditions 
of soil. But, broadly speaking, the 
shape of a horse's foot is in all cases 
governed to a greater or less extent by 
the class of soil on which the animal is 
bred and reared. Damp soil causes the 
production of soft, spongy horn in the 
feet of young horses, and dryness, on the 
other hand, favors the growth of tough 
and closely textured horn. 

The feet of growing horses reared on 
soft, spongy and damp soil are very apt 
to become overgrown or badly shaped, 
owing to the insufficient amount of wear 
which the horn is subjected to on such 
soil. In consequence of the horn con- 
tinually growing and not sufficient of it 
being worn away the hoofs readily become 
overgrown, and if this is not remedied by 
the use of the drawing knife they eventual- 
ly assume a bad shape. 



Breeding Stock. 




A LOAD OF ALFALFA 



of good intelligence can be successful in 
some degree in breeding draft horses. 

Good horses always command good 
prices, while inferior animals are offered 
on the market at most any price. In 
making selection of sire or dam, it is well 
to take into consideration the constitu- 
tional vigor, intelligence, muscular power, 
and, above all, perfect soundness in limb, 
body and internal organ*; These matters 
must not be overlooked if you desire a 
good foal. To be successful in breeding 
horses you must have an intelligent con- 
ception of the subject in all its details and 
requirements. 

It is a good policy to keep your horses 
always fat. If you have any horses for 
sale you cannot afford to offer them on 
the market in a poor condition. When a 
thin horse is led out for inspection, he is 
at a great disadvantage. Purchasers will 
always pay a higher price for a fat horse. 
You never saw a handsome horse that 
was poor and run down. Some men say 
they would not buy a horse that was 
loaded down with fat, but the indisputa- 
ble fact remains that in the public sale 
ring or in the private stable, the horse 
that is in good flesh brings by far the best 
price, other things being equal. No man 
can tell whether a poor horse can be 
fattened or not. Now and then some 
horses cannot be fattened, and the 
stranger will be afraid that your thin 
horse is one of that kind. — Ohio Farmer. 



When young horses are reared on dry 
uplying land, where the soil is com- 
paratively firm and hard, the horn of the 
hoofs wear away at a much more rapid 
rate than it does in the case of spongy 
and soft soil, and there is much less risK 
of the feet becoming overgrown or assum- 
ing a bad shape. In practice this is 
simply borne out by the fact that the 
percentage of cases of badly shaped feet 
is much smaller among horses reared on 
dry and firm soil than it ia among those 
that have been bred on soft and marshy 
land 

A Tribute to Scotch Cattle. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



Poultry in the orchard helps the orchard 
by destroying insects and scattering 
manure. 



A tribute such as never before has been 
paid to any breed of cattle, says the 
Breeders Gazelle, comes from Britain to 
the Scotch Shorthorn. The sale season 
in Scotland has now closed for the year 
and completed returns show that since 
Jan. 1, last, 1105 Shorthorns have been 
sold at public sale in Caledonia for an 
average price of $259. Last year the 
average price of 1004 Shorthorns sold in 
Scotland at public auction was $165. 
Considering the condition of the industry 
in the United States and Canada and the 
consequent fact that American orders 
were almost wholly eliminated from the 
Scotch trade the showing made by the 
cosmopolitan red, white and roans is re- 
markable. History proves that while 
there may be some slight variation, pure- 
bred cattle are seldom high in one part of 
the world and very low in another for any 
very great length of time and the up- 
ward tendency of prices in Britain may 
reascnably be taken as an index of the 
course of the pedigreed market in the 
United States. 



One should aim to use those birds that 
are fully matured, as from such the young 
stock will be of large size and greater 
vigor than from young and immature 
birds. A cock of from two to four years 
of age. with hens of from one to three 
years of age, will give excellent results, 
much better, as a general thing, than 
from younger stock. Turkeys will often 
breed well up to five and six years of age. 
One should not look for excessive weieht 
in breeding stock, but rather for good- 
sized frame and- vigorous constitution. 
An over fat bird is seldom a good breeder. 
One male bird is sufficient for four to six 
females, the number varying somewhat 
according to the vigor of the male bird. 

I have been surprised many times to 
see breeders sell oft" their largest and best 
birds on the market and a very large per 
cent of those who attempt to raise tur- 
keys are doing this year after year, and 
keeping the small birds for breeding, 
thus they are killing the goose that lays 
the golden egg. In buying a gobbler or 
hens, to change the blood, they choose 
late-hatched, immature birds because 
they cost less. They sometimes reason 
that young hens commence laying sooner 
and do not steal their nests out as 
bad as old hens, not once thinking that 
two-year-old hens or older give stronger 
poultt and are much easier raised, and 
will, therefore, raise much larger percent 
than those raised from poor and im- 
mature stock, not saying anything of the 
excess of weight you would get. This 
practice is not confined to the poor and 
least intelligent people as would be ex- 
pected, but, on the other hand, is followed 
by those well informed, and who appre- 
ciate and pay large prices for horses, 
cattle and sheep that are bred in the blue. 
If 8ii ch a course was pursued in this stock 
and followed up very long the best stock 
in existence would be ruined in a few 
generations. 

To breed from poor or immature' speci- 
mens is a violation of one of the first laws 
of breeding. Selection of the best for 
generations has given us jhe improved 
and most profitable breeds "of stock. The 
hereditary influence of such selections is 
of great value. The most inferior bird 
out of such a flock of blood lines may 
"throw back" and breed very fine stock 
and do better than a much finer bird from 
a haphazard breed strain. But the re- 
peated selection of inferior birds for a 
number of generations makes this in- 
feriority hereditary. The future of the 
flock depends almost entirely on the 
parent stock or its ancestry. If valuable 
birds are used in the breeding, their off- 
spring will be like them and will amply 
repay for all your expense and trouble. 
The best are the cheapest and are none too 
good.— Norris 6. Temple, tor.opson, Pa. 



Life of a Dairy Cow. 

' The question is asked if high feeding 
and large production will not wear out a 
dairy cow in a very few years," says L. 
W. Lightly in Xational Stockman. "I 
put the question to an old and experienced 
dairyman and feeder, and his reply struck 
me as very sensible. 'The better I fed 
and cared for the cows the longer they 
lasted and gave me a good profit.' The 
dairy cow, as we know her, is a machine 
to convert feed into milk, and, so far as 
we have learned, no cow will work be- 
yond her capacity under normal con- 
ditions— that is, unless forced to do it by 
drugs or unnatural feeds. In fact the 
cow that has plenty of easily digested 
food should last longer than the one that 
must rustle for a living most of her time, 
as the body is better nourished with less 
energy expended to get that nourishment. 
Experience and observation seem to con- 
firm this. If the large production of 
milk and butter is exhausting to the 
animal and will tend to wear out the 
secreting machinery the fact baa certainly 
never been demonatrated." 



January 7, 1905] 



13 



Forestry in California. 



California has over 28,000,000 acres, or 
over one-fifth of its total area, under 
forest cover. Much of this land is finely 
timbered, and, with forest management, 
will be increasingly valuable for the wood 
which it can supply. But in California 
the forests have another use. which, as is 
well understood in that State, is even 
more important than the production of 
timber-to conserve the water supply. 
The wonderful agricultural development 
which irrigation has made possible is 
perhaps the largest fact in California's 
recent economical history. Because of 
the need of water and the fea.- of floods 
public sentiment in favor of forest pro- 
tection in California has always been well 
in advance of that in other States, as was 
conspicuously illustrated after President 
Cleveland, in 1897, proclaimed the 13 
Federal Reserves created at the close of 
his administration. Everywhere else in 
the Weat the opposition aroused was so 
strong that the proclamation was soon 
afterward temporarily suspended ; but a 
special exception was made in the case of 
California, where public opinion was from 
the first strongly in favor of the reserves. 

Something less than one-third of the 
entire wooded area of the State is now 
embraced in the Federal forest reserves 
That the remaining 20,000,000 acres of its 
forests may be made to serve the public 
interest in the fullest possible measure, 
the State nae solicited and secured the 
co-operation of the Bureau of Forestry in 
working out a proper forest policy for it. 
Members of the Bureau have, since July, 
1993, examined over 21,000,000 acres of 
forest and brush lands, and Dy the end of 
the year the entire State will have been 
covered. The different types of land-as 
timberland, chaparral, pasture and agri- 
cultural land, barrens, cut-over land, and 
burned land— will be mapped and the 
stand of timber in each location will be 
roughly estimated Forest reserves may 
be increased in number or size, if land 
most suitable for that purpose is found. 

But the subject of paramount impor- 
tance is the prevention and control of 
fires A good opportunity for experiment 
along this line was afforded the Bureau 
by co-operation with the private owner 
of an 80,000-acre tract, who had previously 
introduced a crude fire-protection system. 
A comprehensive plan was outlined and 
its execution begun. There has not been 
time for a thorough trial, but its installa- 
tion has had an excellent effect. The 
patrolling of the tract has been greatly 
improved, and the neighbors now vol- 
untarily report all fires, whether on or 
off the tract. There has not been a 
serious fire on that tract this season. 
This splendid showing is an impressive 
object lesson. It proves the efficiency of 
intelligent care and of fighting fires at the 



start. The present fire laws of the State 
are incomplete and inadequate. One 
result of the work of the Bureau will be 
the recommendation of a fire law which, 
if adopted, will be the best ever passed 
by any State. 

The most encouraging fact in forest 
management is the growing determina- 
tion of large timberland owners to em- 
ploy private foresters to handle their 
holdings. This will ensure a method of 
lumbering less wasteful than tnat at 
present practiced, and, more important 
by far, it will be the means of better 
protecting the forests and making them 
yield a continuous crop. Such expert 
control will be especially valuable in 
solving the prob'em of the best way to 
get rid of the slash, which, until burned, 
is a constant menace to the forests. Ex- 
tensive experiments in slash burning 
have already been carried on by the 
Bureau with satisfactory results. 

The Bureau agents are also studying 
the habits and rate of growth of sugar 
and yellow pine to determine the practi- 
cability of lumbering so as to secure a 
second crop. The field work on these 
studies is now about complete. A report 
on what growth and returns may be ex- 
pected from plantations of different spe- 
cies of gum is nearly ready for trans- 
mittal. 

The study of chaparral has led to fruit- 
ful practical conclusions. It Bhows in 
California the same remarkable ability to 
encroach upon and spread over open 
country that it exhibits in Texas and else- 
where in the semiarid portions of the 
Southwest. It makes a satisfactory 
watershed cover, and almost constantly 
replaces a forest destroyed by fire. Its 
composition varies with aspect and eleva- 
tion and with damage by fire. 

The natural reproduction of forest trees 
has been thoroughly investigated by the 
Bureau, together with the extent of the 
forest in the past, the effect of fire upon 
forest reproduction, the contest between 
chaparral and forest on burned areas, 
and the rate of growth of young forest 
trees. Every State which has large, val- 



Poultry Pointers. 



It is not a good plan to keep all kinds 
of poultry in the same house or yard. 

With poultry the profits are too often 
estimated solely from the amount of 
products sold. 

To make a success one must have 
healthy fowls and comfortable quarters 
for them, 

An average of one rooster to a dozen 
hens is sufficient to keep during the 
summer. 

The flavor of the eggs depends very 
much on the kind of food given to the 
poultry. 

Coops containing broods of chicks 
should be moved frequently, so as to 
keep the ground occupied clean. 

Meat, milk, the cereal grains, with 
plenty of hard bone cut fine will make 
good poultry if kept free from lice. 

A good breed is not alone sufficient to 
make money. Good care, good feed and 
good quarters are ever necessary. 

A writer says that nothing is saved by 
making a little feed go a long way. Feed 
full rations and secure rapid growth. 

Some poultrymen have their chickens 
weigh two pounds in ten weeks. They 
feed all the chicks will eat all the time 

The natural tendency of fowl is to eat 
to repletion and then remain quiet, thus 
bringing on an excessive overfat con- 
dition. 

Experiments show that in general the 
best results are obtained from hens hav 
ing from eight to ten square feet of floor 
space in a henhouse. 

As often as every second year a cock 
should be brought that is full of vigor and 
pure blood and be employed to build up 
the stami la of the flock. 

In our anxiety to make every edge cut 
we get too much to do. As a result much 
of it is not more than half done. The 
keeping of too much poultry comes under 
this head. 

Usually care enough is not exercised 
with young chicks The mother should 
be put into a coop for several days, where 
she should roost at night, and not turned 



In some places cattle are affected by 
rheumatism. They need nitrate of pot- 
ash. It may be given two or three tea- 
spoonsful three times a day, in their 
feed, or water, and the parts may be 
rubbed with some good liniment. 

o 



The standard facts about the cow, the 
butter, the milk and the milker, are as 
true one year as another, yet there are 
certainly new things being discovered and 
invented, which the wise manager will 
recognize and adopt. 



Racing! Racing! 




New California Jockey Club 
OAKLAND TRACK 

COMMENCING SATURDAY, NOV. 12 

Racing Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

RACES START AT 2:15 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, ai 12,12 30,1. 
1:30 or 2. 

Returning, trains leave the track at 4:10 and 
4:45 p. m., and immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




.. \& 
Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it is Invaluable 
Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold is 
Warranted to give satisfaction. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by druggist*, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
its use. trTScnd for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 
The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



uable forests or a climate which demands I oufc ia the morning until the dew is off. 
extensive irrigation for farming purposes' 
should, in its own interest, adopt a defi- 
nite and enlightened forest policy. Work 
similar to that nearing completion in 
California should be in progress in at 
least a dozen other States of the Union 
right now, if yast timber reeources are 
not to be further ruinously depleted and 
farming interests are to be properly safe- 
guarded. — Press Bulletin U. S. Bureau 
of Fvrrestry. 

Winter schools of agriculture are be. 
coming increasingly more attractive and 
valuable. Not only is horticulture and 
agriculture taugh., but dairying, book- 
keeping, and poiltry They are giying 
persons of small means opportunity to 
acquire a working knowledge of lines 
vyhieh will prove highly profitable to them 
on the farm. 

o 

That was certainly a remarkable per- 
formance for a cow at the World's Fair. 
She secreted milk at an average rate of 
one and a halfquarts of milk per hour for 
one hundred and twenty days. The cost 
of the feed was $36.57. If the milk had 
sold at five cents a quart, the 8000 quarts 
would have been worth $200. 

o 

The dairy division of the Department 
of Agriculture has been assisting in pro- 
curing butter for the use of the navy and 
the array by drawing contracts for butter 
making and supervising their execution. 
Under this system over 700,000 pounds of 
butter have been purchased during the 
year by the Navy Department alone. 
o 

Those who expect to pursue dairying 
should take a short course in some agri- 
cultural school. If they can not be spared 
during the winter, they should go during 
the summer. It is the cap sheaf to a high 
school education, and fits them for good 
work from the beginning. 



The farmer with large range and 
scattered feed has a fine opportunity to 
produce eggs at a small cost. Many of 
them, by the management of their wives, 
pay almost all of their incidental expenses 
by paying some attention to the hens. 

The continued high price of poultry 
and eggs argues an increasing demand. 
There was never so many raised as now. 
The supply is not equal to the demand, 
nothwithstanding the standard of pro- 
duction is higher than ever, and every 
hen is expected to do her full duty. 

Wherever the coop for young chicks is 
set it should be high enough to be out of 
the stream when it rains, or a ditch 
3hould be dug around it. Dryness is one 
of the essential elements in poultry rais 
Ing. 

Cows can be fed to great advantage, 
with a view to their next Iai tation period. 
Cows should have a resting period of 
about six week The feed should be light 
and nutritious, and reduced to a minimum 
if the cows are hard to dry off. They 
should clean up their feed well. 

o 

The man who compels his cow to stand 
in the rain and cold may not be surprised 
if he does not find his milk pail full be- 
cause there is no particular affinity 
between the full pail and a hard shower 
although milk contains a large per cent 
of water. 

o 

There is often complaint about farm 
cows. They do not give butter and milk 
as liberally as he desired. If the cow 
could talk she would probably make he 
defense by saying that she does not 
receive liberal feed and liberal care. 
o 

Perhaps one reason many dairy farmers 
do not get rich iB because few men in any 
business get rich. It is a good business, 
and there is a comfortable living in it. 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copvrights &c. 

ivone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whether an 
i vention is nrolial.lv patentable. Coinmuiuca- 
tlo,?8Bt! fietlyconfldentfal. HANDBOOK <>•> Patents 

sent tree, eldest agency lor securing patents. 

Patents taken through Miiini & Co. receive 
special notice without charge, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. I.nrgest cir- 
culation of any sclent itio journal. 1 firms, fi a 
year- four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 361Broadway New York 

Brauch Office. G25 F St., Washington, D. C. 




672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

ZIBBELL & SON, Proprietors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAT,. 



Ouk Specialty: 
Boarding, Training and 
Handling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. 

A few Nice Rigs always on hand 



kn any oar going 
to The Chutes 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 

Artistic Designing. 
BOO Mission. St., oor. First, San Frauotsoo. 



11 



[ January 7, 1905 



FOR SALE. 

GEO. W. McKiNNEY 2:14 1-4 

TS A HANDSOME BLOOD BAY, 8 YEARS 
-1- old. with star In his forehead and one white 
foot. Stands 16 hands and 1 Inch; weighs 1250 lbs 
Individually he is a horse ol grand finish and 
plenty of substance. Has a tine disposition, 
strong shoulders, stout back, very strong loins 
and stIBes, strong bone, with Kood feet and legs 
He is sired by the great McKinney 2:ll)< His 
dam, Lady Washington 2:35, had 5 colts— Geo. 
W MoKlnney 2:14^- El Molina 2.20, Washington 
McKinney (trial 2:22H),Idle Gosslper (trial 2:25), 
Isaac. 2 years old (trial 2:51)— was by Whipple, 
No 8951: grandam Lady Maybury.dam of Dubec 
2:16 and others. _ 

Horse Is now at Hemet.Cal. For particulars 
address W. F WHITTIER, 

20 Fremont St , San Francisco, Cal 



ALL FOR SALE. 

MARVIN WILKES 2:18 three-year-old stal- 
lion, stake winner, a grand individual, a game 
race horse, absolutely sound and will trot sure in 

2:10 

GOLD CROWN, stallion by Falrose four-year- 
old. Large, grandly bred, handsome and fast. 

ROSALIN. five-year-old broodmare by Falrose. 
Bred to Nutwood A'ilkes. 

ARDIS, two-year-old Ally by Falrose. Splen- 
did trotting prospect. 

NORA S., trial 2:1", trotting. Sired by Sable 
Wilkes, first dam Grace by Nutwood 600; second 
dam Grade 2:37m by Jack Hayes, thoroughbred. 
You will note that Nora S. is the dam of Marvin 
Wilkes, Gold Crown, Rosaltn and Ardls 

FALROSE 2:19, greatest sire on this Coast out 
of the same class of mares. 

CHAS. MARVIN, stallion, fine individual, 
grandly bred and a beautiful trotter. 

DAKEN D. 2:16M, large, kind and beautiful 
gelding Can step a Quarter in 30 seconds. 

PENROSE 2:18X, Raiding, grandest gentle- 
man's road horse on this Coast; he is perfection 
in every way and can step in 2:10 when in condi- 
tion. 

Also sulkies, oarts. and horse goods. For breed- 
ing and further particulars address 

W. MASTIN, 2228 H St., Sacramento. 



STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

nirraW Will in son of the 8 reat Dlcta- 
UltldlOr W1IKCS, tor and Manola by Geo 
Wilkes, second dam the great broodmare Lizzie 
Brinker by Drennon. DICTATOR WILKES is a 
dark bay horse with size, style and excellent con- 
formation He stands 15 3 and weighs 1100. Was 
never worked for speed except a little as a two- 
year-old, when he was very pramlslng He is the 
sire of Monroe S. 2: \3\i and other very fast trot- 
ters and pacers. 

Tnmocrol son of Palo Alto 2:08?i and Telle 
1 ClllCMal, (dam of Truman 2:12 and two 
others In the list) by Gen. Benton. TEMESCAL 
is a handsome chestnut, stands 16 2, weighs 1250 
pounds has an excellent disposition and size and 
style. But one of his get has ever been worked, a 
filly out of a Dexter Prinoe mare, and she shows 
much speed and great promise. 

For prices and further particulars address 
W. A. SHIPPEE, 

oo22eow Nelson, Butte Co, Cal. 



Two Prince Airlie Stallions For Sale, 

iMiiKKAir 2- IB 1 2 b y Pr |n ce Alrlle 28015 by 
MlI.ltKAK -s.iu l t Guy wilkes 2:15*, sire of 
Fred Kohl 2:07»i. Hulda 2:08!4. Seymour Wilkes 
2:0854; 1st dam Fearless by Fallis 4781 (rec 2:23). 
sire of John R Baldwin 2:17*, Fallacy 2:1754, Fal- 
rose 2:19, and dam of JaDice 2-08M: 2d dam Jean 
Perault by Signal 3327. MILBRAE has been In 
training just one year, getting a trotting record 
of 2:1654 (trial 2:13) with first half in 1:05. a quar- 
ter In :31*. This is no measure of his speed. He 
is a seal brown, 16 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, 6 
years old- 

„,, v 174IH b y Prince Alrlle 28045 by 
MENLO BOY Guy wnkes 2 :\bH: 1st 

dam Signal by Del Sur 1098, grandam Lady Signal 
by Signal 3327. With very little work he has 
trotted In 2:2954, quarters in :35. He is a brown 
with white pasterns, 16.1 hands, weighs about 
1170, and 5 years old. 
For further Information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park Cal 

FOR SALE. 

Black Mare, 7 years old, 16 hands high, by 
McKinney 2:11*. dam by Antevolo 219; second 
dam Fontana (dam of Silas Skinner 2:17 and 
Flora Belle 2:23) bv Almoot33; third dam Fanny 
Williams (dam of Bay Chieftain 228) by Alexan- 
der's Abdallah. She has trotted miles in 2:24. 
Also her 

Weanling Filly by Stam B. 2:11; entered In 
the Kentucky Futurity and the Pacific Breeders 
Futurity Stakes. 

Price, »7 50 for both. 

Apply to or address A M. SCHMIDT, Room 27, 
Macdonough Building, Oakland. Cal. 

STALLION FOR SALE. 

Sidney Boy 22991. ^ kVdS^SiSSai 

16 hands and weighs 1150 pounds In color he Is a 
dark bay or brown, and In every respect a splen- 
did individual. On his dam's side he carries the 
blood of David Hill, a strain that Is muoh sought 
after by Eastern horsemen. He Is a sure foal- 
get er and sires size, style, speed and quality. 
He has a good disposition and a lady can drive 
him with perfeot safety. His colts are here to 
show for themselves. For particulars address 
J. W. STtTFFLEBEEM, Tulare, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

R0BIZ0LA 2:12 1=4 (trotting) 

By Robin 18370; earn Myrtle by Anteeo; second 
dam Luella by Nutwood ROBIZOLA Is a hand- 
some bay mare. 7 years old. stands nearly 16 
hands and welgl c about 1050 lbs.; absolutely 
sound; excellent r >a<lster and high-class race 
horse and brood mare. Can be seen at Morton's 
stable, cor. Geary and Leavenworth streets, San 
Franoisco. Address 

DR> J. W. CLARK, Santa Rosa. 



McKINNEY MARE FOR SALE. 

* 1 O.I A 1 Gray mare by McKinney, 

ArKPttl J.1g dam by A. W. Richmond; 
9 years oU; Sound; Good race horse In her class 
and a flrst olass road mare; Gentle, does not 
pull and city oroken. Reason for selling is that 
owner has not time to devote to a horse of this 
class. Address, STEVE MADISON, 

City Wator Works, Vancouver, B. C. 



FOR SALE. 

Y ORDER OF CONGRESSMAN J. C. NEED- 
HAM I am authorized to sell the following 
highly bred mares, colts and Allies: 
STUB. b. m. 9 yrs old, sired by Directed (son of 
Director and Twist, dam of Steve Whipple 
2:12): 1st dam by Chieftain 721; 2d dam Jenny 
Lind by Vt. Blaok Hawk 5, Ac. 
Bay Filly, 3 yrs old. by Temescal (son of Palo 
Alto and Telie. dam of four, by Gen. Benton); 
dam Stub by Directed [see above]. 
Bay Filly, 2 yrs old, by Guy McKinney, dam 
Stub. 

Brown Colt, 1 yr old, by Guy McKinney, dam 

Stub. 

Bay Colt, weanling, by Charles Derby 2:20, dam 
Stub. 

DAISY WHIPPLE, br. m , 13 yrs old, sired by 
Steve Whipple 2:12; dam by McCracken's 
Golddust; 2d dam by Willlamson'sBelmont. 

Chestnut Gelding, 2 yrs old. by Directed: dam 
Daisy Whipple 

Bay Colt, weanling, by Directed; dam Daisy 
Whipple. 

CADDIE WHIPPLE, b. m., 11 yrs old, sired by 
Steve Whipple 2:12; dam Caddie R. by Elect; 
2d dam Young Flora Hill (dam of Needbam's 
Whipple (2) 2:27*0 by Chieftain 721, &c. 

Brown Filly, 2 yrs old, by Directed; dam Caddie 
Whipple. 

Brown Filly, weanling, by Directed; dam Caddie 
Whipple. 

Chestnut Filly, 3 yrs old. by Directed; dam Bes- 
sie Whipple by Steve Whipple 2:12; 2d dam 
by McCraoken's Golddust; 3d dam by William- 
son's Belmont. 

The three two-year-olds are entered in the Ken- 
tucky Futurity, $21,000, for foals of 1902. 

The yearling colt by Guy McKtnney is entered 
in the Kentucky Futurity, $22,000; the Hartford 
Futurity. $15 000; the Horse-Review Stake, $10,000, 
and the American Horse Breeder Stake, $10,000, 
for foals of 1903— $5 ,000 worth of stakes In all. 

The weanling colt by Charles Derby-Stub Is 
entered In the American Horse Breeder Stake, 
$10,000, for foals of 1904. 

The weanling colt by Directed-Dalsy Whipple 
Is entered In the Horse Review Slake, $10,000, for 
foals of 1904. 

All good size, Bne individuals. Lack of time to 
devote to the horses Is the reason for selling. For 
further particulars call on or address 

H B. NEEDHAM, 
R. F. D. No. 2, Modesto, Cal. 



A 



FOR SALE. 

HANDSOME 4-YEAR-OLD BAY FILLY; 
pacer: stands 16.2>4 hands; sired by McKin- 
ney, dam Mission Bell by St Nicholas. Full sis- 
ter to Mechanic A smooth gaited filly, goes 
without straps or boots, and with less than a 
month's handling has paced a half In 1:11. Is sure 
to make a fast pacer. Address or apply to JOHN 
ROWAN, 1347 East South Street, Stockton, Cal 



STOCK FARM FOR SALE. 

IflNE STOCK FARM, HIGHLY IMPROVED. 
" in choice location In California, for sale 
Address Brbeder and Sportsman. 



GOOD PASTURAGE 

EXCELLENT PASTURAGE NEAR PALO 
* J Alto. Plenty of alfalfa and hill land Horses 
led hay and taken up nights If desired No 
barbed-wire fences. Best of care, rates reason- 
able. For particulars address 

•■PASTURAGE," 
Care of Breeder and Sportsman, 
36 Geary St., San Francisco. 



| McMURRAY | 




Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
And LOW PRICES, 
McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 

49-Address, for printed matter and prices, 

W. J. KENNEY 

631 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers- 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send tor catalogue. 



K. P. HEALD, President. 



HIRE HORSES (four Stallions, foals of 1902) 

O sired by British Oak, No. 5687, A. S. H. A., 
Sweepstakes Drafter at California State Fairs. 
Estate of W. H. Howard, 2o6 Sansome Street, 
San Francisoo. 



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Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting Bred 
HORSES 

Giving* Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



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STALLION 



CARDS 



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ill Posters, Folders, etc & 

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(WITH OR WITHOUT ILLUSTRATIONS) 



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Compiled and Printed 

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at Reasonable Rates :::: 



Every Facility for Tracing 
Pedigrees and Performances 



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Neat and Artistic Work 

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••••••••••••••• •*********5*5*5******5J#S5 



Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 7, 1905 1 



15 



The Hunter One-Trigger 



Is Absolutely 



Put on any L, C. SMITH 
GUN, new or old, 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 




HUNTER ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 

SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




NO. 4 List, $100 



WARRANTED SUPERIOR ITO; ANY OTHER 
MAKE COSTING *25 MORE. 




We Make 16 Grades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

To Coast Branch, PHIL B, BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



IF WE COULD SEE YOU and take 
you into our FACTORY, WE could 
easily SHOW 




K YOU WHY 

1 The Parker 

GUN is the BEST 

in the WORLD 



WE aim to make and do make the BEST possible production 
of the (.1 v« AKKK'S ART. WE are jealous of our reputation 
and will not cheapen the quality of our GUN, no matter what 
others may do. IF you want a GUN yon can contlde In us. 

Write today. 




30 CHERRY STREET, MERIDEN, CONN. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS-OUINTO HERD— 77 pre- 
miums Cal State Fair 1902-3-4. Young stock for 
sale. Write us what you want. Est. of W. H. 
Howard, 206 Sansome St., San Franoisco. 

PETER SAXE & SON. Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle. Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited 



HOLSTEIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd: 90% winners at Stat^ and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter contest since 1885 In 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F. 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOL8TEIN8 AND DURH AM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry- Estab- 
lished 1876. William NUes & Co.. Los Angeles 
Oal. 



$25 SUIT SI 

•TvON'T SEND MONEY. Write for particulars 
and we will tell you how you can get a $25 
Ladies' or Gents' tailor-made Suit or Overooat 
for SI. Write today. Address UNION TAILOR- 
ING CO , 230 East Ontario St , Chicago, 111. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEW 
E*|tfrl Cuttfr 
and Filler... 
hint Suit. 
Irom 

S2S.00 up 




Only Ihc 
Bc*i Help 
hmplovfd... 
All work 
done on the 



36 Geiry St.. S. F. Rooms |u 20 Plione Grant 15$ 



T M. LITCHFIELD Ss CO -Drivers' Suits 
« • Colors and Caps, Official Badges. Corre 
spondence solicited. 12 Post St., San Francisco 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 
Breeder and Sportsman, 86 Geary Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

The Aider and noting Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
Information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROOS RROS. 

Outfitters 
to 



MEN 



25 to 27 



BOYS 
KEARNY ST. 

at POST 



Seldom See 

a big knee like this, but 
your horse may have a 
bunch or bruise on his An. 
kle, Hock, Stifle, Knee or 
Throat. 

ABSORBINE 

without laying the horse up. 
Circulars if you want them. 
— $2.00 per bottle, delivered. 
W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

Springfield, Mass. 

For sale by Mack&Co., Langley &MichaelsCo., 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



M. H. McMANUS 

TRAINER AND DRIVER 

Has oponed a Public Stable at 
PLEASANTON 

and will train Trotters and Pacers at reasonable 
rates. MB. McManus has trained and driven 
three 2:10 performers and one that afterwards 
took a record of 1:05%. Correspondeice solicited. 



Tweily-Second Annal Trials 



.OF THE. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 
BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Elsrhth Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisraotion 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Pago 1324 



Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club 

TO BE RUN AT 

Bakersfield 

(KERN COUNTS) 

Commencing Monday, Jan. 9, 1905 

Judge, II L. BETTEN of San Francisco. 

Annual Derby 

All-Aged Stake 

Members' Stake 

Champion Stake 

Entries for All-Aged Stake close Dec. 15,1904 

W. \V. VAN AR8DALE (San Francleco) 
President. 
ALBERT BETZ, Secretary, 
No. 201 Parrott Bldg, S. F , Cal, 

O-For Entry Blanks and information address 
the Secretary. 

AT STUD 



C0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PldS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

308 California Street, San Francisco, Oal, 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbelgh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOGKD ALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfield, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 

CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



A T STUD — CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee 120. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
J- Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., 
B. C. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Tnrln. 

Infirmary and Residence— 811 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: South 456. 

Dr. w rxx, HP. Elgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. Y. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stook 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President oi 
the California State Vetorinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Franoisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main IBS 

CALIFORNIA 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Hoars. 



1 



CAPS ULES 



f 



Superior to Copaiba. Cubebs or Injection 



16 



I January 7, 1905 



South 640 




ORSE BOOTS 



5M 

San Francisco. Cal.^ Gf '^ 



dlfc 



i 



9 



^5 



HIGH GRADE 
AMMUNITION 



YOU WANTED BADLY 



to bring home as large a bag of ducks from the marsh as ife 
your neighbor, but you forgot 



The Main Factor of Success 



which rested in the brand of ammunition you used. There *fc 
is no need of talking about other brands bringing equal 
results when all successful sportsmen agree that ?Jr 



U. M. G. AMMUNITION HAS NO EQUAL 

and that the best results come from its constant use, either 
in the field or over the traps. Better try it!!! 



m 



i 



$ RESULTS: 

$ MOST SATISFACTORY 



PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 
86-88 First St., San Francisco. 



E. E. DRAKE, 

Manager. 



1 RIFLES AND SHOTGUNS 1 

tflNCHESm 

S PACIFIC COAST AGENCY ^IVlIlVJIXJTXriTIOlNr SAN FRANCISCO S 

| 127-135 FIRST STREET A. MULLEE, Agent- CALIFORNIA § 



A New Powder 
Regular; no residue; high 
velocity and regular patterns; 

hard grain, 
Will not pit the gun barrel. 
It is 

"NEW E. C, (Improved)" 
and takes the place of 
"E.C.No, I" and "New E, C." 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 



When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 

and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

330 Market St., San Francisco. 



\ THE DuPONT COMPANY 

$ extends heartiest 

\ Good Wishes to Its Friends 

$ for a most 

| Joyful Holiday Season 



Clabrough, Golcher & Go, 



GUNS 
Sun Goods 

«-Send for Catalogus. 




FISHING 

Tactle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY . . . 
LOADED . . 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 

"E. C." 

SCHULTZE 

HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 
INFALLIBLE " 



What More do vou Want ? 



VOL. XLVI. No. 2. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 14, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




(The iivecber cmfc &p&vt&tnan 



["JANUARY 14, 19('f> 



m 

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§ 
® 

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® 

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@©©®©©©©©®©©©©©©®©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©©@©®@©©©®©©©©©®©®©©©©©©©©©©@^ 



EIGHT HEAD OF LARGE, SOUND YODNG HORSES 

ALL FIVE YEARS OLD 

Thoroughly Broken, Accustomed to Steaju and Electric Cars, also Automobiles. 

Suitable for Single Coupe, Heavy Carriage, Express and Delivery 

Work, According to Size and Weight. 

Bred on tin- Llano Seoo Etancho, Chico, • Butte Co., Gal., and arc by 

The Prize Winning, Imported German Coach Horse SOCRATES 

These Horses are as follows: 

1 pair BLACK GELDINGS, 16.2 1-2 hands, weight 2900 lbs. 
1 BLACK GELDING, 16.3 1-2 hands, weight 1500 lbs 
1 CHESTNUT GELDING, 16.3 1-2 hands, weight 1400 lbs. 
1 BAY MARE, 16.1 hands, weight 1400 lbs 
1 BAY MARE, 16.2 hands, weight 1350 lbs. 
1 BLACK GELDING, 16.2 hands, weight 1330 lbs. 
1 BAY GELDING, 16.1 handf, weight 1300 lbs. 



This Pair especially suited for a Hearse 



@ 
@ 
@ 
® 

® 

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© 
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ese horses are putting on weight every day. They are at the Baywood Stud Stables, San Mateo, Cat., where they may be seen (in harness if desired) ft 
time aDd on any day. S P. trains from Third and Townsend streets leave at convenient hours (or San Mateo. Electric cars from Market. «nfl mtti. ® 

© 
© 
© 
© 
© 



Th 

at any time and on any day. S P. trains from Third and Townsend streets leave at convenient Hours lor San Mateo. Electric cars from Market and Fifth 
streets to San Mateo every 30 minutes. The Baywood Stud Stables are 10 minutes walk from railway station or terminus of electric cars. 
For full particulars address 

WALTER SEALY, Manager The Baywood Stud, San Mateo, Cal 

There are, besides, some ten head of smaller and lighter horses by the same sire, all five years old, suitable for carriage work, single or double. This 
fine lot can also be seen at the Baywood Stud Stables (in harness if desired). 



CAMPBELL'S HORSE FOOT REMEDY BEST S REMEDY 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
compounds. It is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good servioes out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements. 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quickly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS if directions are followed 

It PRE.VEXTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH, STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on race courses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals it. In many cases horses have reduced 
their records several seconds, due to its use. 

It is a CER'J AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 

We Guarantee That It Will Do Wbat We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICES:-Quarls. 8100; Half-Gallon, $1.75; Gallon, $3 
;2M-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, $10.00. 

Books giving full directions for Its use and much valuable information as to shoeing are supplied 
free. 

Don't fail to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure in next 
Issue of this paper. It Is the best and because of its merits is rapidly displacing. all others. 

JAS. B. CAnPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers. 4 1 2 W. Hadlson St.CrllCAQO, ILL' 

Sold bv all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for It 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



5 



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AS THEY 
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A RE 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR-the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
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SINGMASTER &SONS.OF Keota Iowa. 

KRKEDKKS AND IMPORTERS OF 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

127 St. John Street, San Jose, Cal. 

' High-class stock always on hand. It will pay to call and Inspect stock If you are In need of a 
good stallion C. O. STANTON. San Jose Manager 

Advertise Your Stallion for Season of 1905. 



FROM THE CONSERVATIVE TRAINER OP VILLAGE FARM 

Who showed Beau Ideal at the National Horse Show at Madison Sunare 
Garden this rail and won the Blue Ribbon In the fe ' la * re 
Champion Stallion Cla.g says: 

„ „ „ Village Farm, East Aurora, N. Y.. November 21 1901 
Millard Sanders at Memphis. Tenn , recommended "Save the "Horse" to me 
three years ago I used It on a bad tendon on which I had used about every known 
treatment without result. After two weeks treatment with "Save-the-Horae" I 
could see Improvement and from then on the horse went sound and has never 
taken a lame step since I also used it on Thoroughpins and Wlndpuffs and found 
it worked equally as well as It cleaned the enlargements off entirely and the? 
have never come back I have used every known blister and the Are iron but 
have never had anything to compare with "Savetbe-Horse " I buy it rom 
6 ? & m ™ s „ er K f » u " al ° a ?dof Bruce * Co. of Memphis. Tenn., in Kilf dozen 
lots. I will never be without it. 13ENJ. F. WHITE 

The Tontine Boarding and Livery Stables 
t .,.<,...! - ,,. . ... , 363 E1 Bhth Ave., New York, Nov 20. 1904 

« SS™„ n , l u 3 ear '° Id s i a L lion . lame over a year - H,! was n °» w °rth $10. I used 
your -Save the-Horse" and he has gone sound ever since. I have driven him 
twenty-flve miles in one day and would not now take fc'50for the animal 

WILLIAM MILLER. 

, k j , „ .. „ „ „ . Franklin Park, Saugus, Mass., November 21, 1904. 

I have used ^Save the-Horse on bad legs, splints, big knee and on bunches with perfeot success 
in every case Have used it on many horses for many conditions. It has never failed I would sug- 
gest that you write to Ray Werner of Coldwater, Mich , who was one of the first to tell me of the 
great success obtained with your remedy y p. pox 

"SAVE-THE-HORSE" PERMANENTLY CURES BONE AND BOG SPAVIN THOROUGH- 
PIN, RINGHONE (except low ringbone). CURB, SPLINT, CAPPED HOCK WINDPUFF SHOF 
BOIL, WEAK AND SPRAINED TENDONS AND ALL LAMENESS. Apply in all extremes of 
weather. Cures without scar or loss of hair Horses may work as usual. 

$5 OO per bottle. Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bottle improbable 
except in rarest cases. »5.0O at druggists and dealers or sent express paid by 

TROY CHEMICAL COMPANY, Manufacturers, BINGHAMPTON, NEW YORK 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 




0AKW00DS STOCK FARM 

California's Largest Importing and Breeding Establishment. 

High-class Stock always on hand. Good terms. Moderate prices. Libera) guarantee Visitors 

always welcome. Address all correspondence to 

OAKWOODS STOCK FARM, Francis I. Hodokiks, Prop., STOCKTON. CAL' 



PERCHERON, 
BELGIAN and 
COACH 
STALLIONS 



Pedigrees Tabulated 



and type written ready for framing 
Write for prices. Breeder and 
Sportsman, 36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



January 14 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific oast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O- BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Terms-One Year *3. Six Months 81.75, Three Months SI 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
tddressed to F. W. Keixet, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 14, 1905. 



THE NE"W SPEED TRACK and Athletic Field 
which is now in course of construction in Goldeu 
Gate Park, San Francisco, the building of which has 
heen made possible by the generosity of the lovers of 
true sport in tbis community, is pictured on our front 
page this week very much as it will be when finished. 
It will be one of the unique features of our city, as 
nothing like it has ever been constructed in any other 
city in the world. It is situated between Stow Lake 
and the H street southern boundary of the Park, and 
will present the appearance of a vast amphitheatre 
sodded in blue grass and surrounded by a cinder path, 
a bicycle path aid a speed track for harness horses, 
outside of which a beautiful inclined green sward will 
furnish room for thousands of spectators. The speed- 
way is to be oval in shape, and three-quarters of a mile 
in circumference on the inside. It will be sixty feet in 
width all the way round, with the turns thrown up 
about one inch to the foot. The Park Commissioners 
are now in consultation with the best authorities on 
track building and will endeavor to make this the 
best and fastest three-quarter mile speedway in the 
world. Twenty-five feet inside this track and twelve 
feet below it, (a blue grass slope intervening) there 
will be constructed a bicycle track about two-thirds 
of a mile in length and thrown up on the turns for 
speed. Ten or twelve feet within this bicycle track, 
will be a cinder path for running contests between 
athletes. This will be about five-eights of a mile in 
circumference. Within these three ovals will be a 
sodded infield suitable for polo, football, lacrosse, 
bowling and all athletic field events, other than base 
ball and tennis, beautiful grounds and courts for 
which are already prominent featuies of Golden Gate 
Park. The Park Commissioners will provide sheds 
and paddocks for cooling out horses, and bath showers 
for the use of the athletes. In short this ground, 
with its tracks and athletic field will be the finest and 
mo9t complete amateur pleasure ground in the world, 
and will be preserved strictly for amateur sports, all 
contests or racing for money being prohibited by the 
rules of the Golden Gate Park Commissioners. As 
will be seen by reference to the picture there will be 
tunnels under the eastern and north-western ends of 
the speed track, through which spectators on foot 
can pass to the bicycle and cinder paths and athletic 
field. On the outside of the trotting track a prome- 
nade walk for spectators will extend the full length of 
the ova). Superintendent of the Park McLaren, since 
his return from his vacatioo, during which time he 
visited many of the great parks of America and 
Europe, is most enthusiastic over the construction of 
this beautiful addition to Golden Gate Park's many 
attractions and proposes to make it the grandest 
public field ever constructed in this or any other 
country. Work has already begun and hundreds of 
workmen and teams can be seen daily moving the dirt 
and grading the grounds. 

For several years the road drivers and horsemen of 
San Francisco have desired a place in Golden Gate 
Park where they could speed their horses. Some 
years ago the Park Commissioners constructed the 
mile speedway along the south drive, which has an" 
swered the purpose of providing a place where horses 
could be driven at speed, but it wa9 a straightaway 
track with considerable up and down grade, and so 
situated that spectators could not see both start and 
finish, or more than an eighth of the track from any 
one point, without standing in the track, owing to 
the conformation of the sandhills through which it 
was buih and the heavy foliage which flanks It on 
both sides. Some months ago the Amateur Driving 
and Athletic Association of San Francisco was formed 
with a membership composed of gentlemen who are 
interested in all sorts of amateur outdoor sports. This 



organization elected Mr. W. J. Simpson as President 
and Frank G. O'Kane as Treasurer, and appointed a 
committee composed of Frank G. O'Kane, I. L. Bor- 
den, James Coffin, John Flournoy, John A. McKerron, 
Richard Tobin, Edward Aigellinger and W. J. Simp- 
son to wait upon the Park Commissioners and submit 
a plan to them. The Commissioners estimated that 
it would take at least $40,000 to construct a speed 
track and athletic grounds in the Park, and proposed 
that if the committee would raise $20,000 the Commis- 
sioners would supply the balance from the Park 
funds. This was a definite proposition anJ the com" 
mittee went to work. And right here it is no more 
than right to say that to Mr. Frank G. O'Kane is due 
the most of the credit for raising the $20,000 which 
has already been paid over to the commissioners. All 
the committeemen and many others worked 
hard and hid well, but Mr. O'Kane made 
it his personal work and tramped the city 
from business house to business house soliciting 
subscriptions. He became an enthusiasm in the matter 
and has been the leading spirit in the work which is 
now accomplished. Mr. O'Kane is the leading mem- 
ber of the great harness and saddle firm of J. O'Kane 
& Son that has business houses in San Francisco and 
New York. He is himself an ex-champion amateur 
athlete, an excellent amateur driver and a prominent 
member of theOlympic Club of this city sicce his boy- 
hood. His love for clean outdoor sport of all kinds 
made him an enthusiast in the new enterprise and 
when he drew his check for $20,000 as Treasurer of 
the Amateur Athletic Association, and handed it over 
to the Park Commissioners, he admitted that it was 
the proudest day of his life, although he modestly re- 
marked that it was not his money, but the coin con- 
tributed by 650 subscribers, of which he was simply 
the custodian. The Park Commissioners who re- 
ceived the fund and ordered the work begun are 
Messrs. R. H. Lloyd, A. B. Spreckels, A. Altman, F. 
J. Sullivan and W. J. Dingee. Mr. Spreckels is the 
largest single contributor to the fund having headed 
the subscription list with $1000. The work is under 
way and there is an assurance that San Francisco will 
soon have within its beautiful Golden Gate Park, the 
finest speed track and athletic field in the world. It 
will take several months to complete the work, but 
by the middle of the summer of 1905 its completion will 
probably be celebrated by a grand gala day of sport, 
during which all the tracks and athletic grounds will 
be in use, and we predict that when the day arrives 
Golden Gate Park will hold the greatest, throng of 
people that ever congregated within its borders. 



SECOND PAYMENT will be due ou the first day 
in February on the mares nominated in the 
Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 5. This stake is 
the last and richest of the Futurities and is guaran- 
teed to be worth $7000. It will probably be worth 
$10,000 when it is decided. Don't miss making this 
payment, thus keeping your mare in the stake and 
making her foal eligible to race for the money. See 
the advertisement in this issue and read the substi- 
tution clause. 

THE SOIL of the tract of -land purchased by the 
State Board of Agriculture for new State Fair 
Grounds, is said by W. J. Allen, the expert track 
builder, to be ideal for a race track. It is clay of the 
same kind which cost the association several thousand 
dollars a few years ago to put a thin covering ove»" 
the old track. Mr. Allen says the track constructed 
on the new grounds should be lightning fast for trot- 
ters and pacers. 

TWO GOOD TROTTERS are wanted by J. W. 
Zibbell & Son of th'.s city, whose advertisement 
appears elsewhere in this issue. One must be a high 
class green trotter, the other one with a record that 
can win in the fast classes. They prefer mares, and 
want them for this year's circuit. If the animals are 
well bred, fine individuals and good ones, with prices 
right, they are ready to pay the cash. 



A Skillful Kentucky Driver. 

Scott Hudson, who is now in California, was written 
up in the Christmas edition of the Trotter and l'acer, 
as follows: 

While that skillful Kentuckian, Mr. Scott Hudson, 
has long been favorably known to the trotting horse 
world, it was during the soasons of 1901, 1902 and 1903 
that his meteoric flashes down through the Grand Cir- 
cuit had the entire trotting horse world amazed and 
made turf history so fast that it could scarcely be 
credited. He was the largest money winner of 1901 
and 1902 that ever went down the line of Grand Cir- 
cuit meetings, his stable scooping in $80,000 ono season 
and $90,000 the next. He appeared to be simply in- 
vincible, and whereverone of his horses appeared in a 
race, thousands flocked to the tracks to see him win, 



for they never considered that he could lose. No 
driver, before or since, has had such wonderful success 
down the line Some of the thoughtless ones may 
have attributed his wonderful success to good luck; 
but it was the result of intelligently preparing his 
horses and skillfully driving them. Many of the races 
he won were the most exciting of the seasons and were 
fought out "tooth and toe-nail" to the finish. 

Mr. Hudson is also the only driver that ever won 
two $20,000 races, which he did with Nelly A., in the 
Nutmeg Stake at Hartford and with the great roan 
mare Hawthorne in the Bonner Memorial at Brighton 
Beach, and is the only one who ever cleaned up the 
entire program in one day. He won every race on 
the card at Cleveland one day during the Grand Cir- 
cuit meeting of 1902, with Audubon Boy, Twinkle, 
Alice Russell and Chase. He has won the Bonner 
Memorial twice at Brighton Beach, once with the 
sensational blind horse Rythmic, and the following 
season with Hawthorne. Mr. Hudson also has a 
peculiar affinity for Futurities, having won more of 
these events than any other driver, and he took 
Audubon Boy through the Circuit unbeaten in 1902, 
after being the greatest money winner the previous 
season, when he lost but two races. Last year he 
drove the stallion Jay McGregor and won more money 
with him than was hauled down by any other stallion. 
Nervolo 2:04£, was also one of the greatest money 
winners and took the world 's record for a half and 
one and one-quarter miles. 

Among all the great horses which have been prom- 
inent on the big rings of recent years campaigned by 
Mr. Hudson, it would naturally be thought that he 
would pick one of them as a particular favorite; but 
when he was asked as to what he considered the best 
horse ever drove he went away back to his first 
experiences on the turf. Delia Ship, he said, was one 
of the first fast horses he ever owned and drove and 
he considered her just about the best and the one he 
liked best to drive in a race. During the season of 
1893 he won thirteen straight races with her, and he 
thinks a better race mare never lived, and but for her 
unfortunate death after the campaign would have 
taken high rank among the turf stars. 

Mr. Hudson is one of the trainers who can always 
ba found at his stable or working on the track when 
he is on the road, being a hard worker, a careful 
trainer and an expert driver. While he did not have 
quite as large a string of campaigners this year, he 
was pretty generally represented in the money when- 
ever he started, although not as great a winner as he 
was during the previous seasons. This fall he began 
to take an active part in the affairs of the Professional 
Drivers' League, as he believes that the drivers should 
have some representation in the formulation of rules 
for their government. His feelings in that matter are 
better expressed in his own words in conversation 
with several horsemen at the Murray Hill Hotel, just 
before he started for California, w here he will spend 
the winter: "The drivers can do nothing without the 
associations and the associations are nothing without 
the drivers, therefore I think they should work 
amicably with each other and make rules for the best 
interests of each. Heretofore, the drivers have not 
had anything to say in the way of making rules, and 
I think they should be given a voice in matters which 
so nearly concern them." 

Horse Values Will Advance. 

It seems to be agreed by all dealers in coach and 
carriage horses that much better prices with an in- 
creased demand will prevail in the early spring. News 
from across the Atlantic is that the auto is rapidly 
going out of use among the royal bloods, who set the 
styles of both continents. There will be an active 
demand for coach and carriage horses for export, and 
the demand will b9 active in all the important sea- 
board cities in the United States. The prices for race 
and matinee and speedway horses will also be better, 
because the demand will be more active than in the 
spring of 1904, and thero is no surplus to supply this 
demand. Even in the breeding centers tnereis no 
over-supply. A letter from Lexington, Ky., just to 
hand, states: "Among the surprises given the trotting 
horsemen during the past week was the announce- 
ment made by Mike Boworman, that he would -sell 
two of his stallions for the simple reason that there is 
a dearth of good mares to breed to. Boworman 
declares that in all his connection with the breeding 
of trotters he never experienced a season or a time 
when broodmaresof a high quality were as scarce as 
thoy are now. This seems to be corroborative of the 
statement made by John Splan that there is an ap- 
proaching famine of horses in America, and Bower- 
man asserts that he has been unable to dispose of the 
services of his horses except to mares of an inferior 
quality, and that to preserve their reputation he has 
refused to mate them, and will now dispose of them.'' 
— American Sportsman. 



4 



(The pwc-oev ant* &pvvx&xnan 



[January 14, 1905 



NEW STATE FAIR GROUNDS. 

Secretary Albert Lindley Outlines Plans for 
Improvements Contemplated. 

Albert Lindley, Secretary of the State Agricultural 
Society recently outlined the plans that have been 
made for the improvement of the annual State Pair, 
a matter of great interest to the people of Sacramento. 
In touching on some of the more important points of 
the subject Mr. Lindley said: 

"Now that the purchase of land has been completed 
and we know definitely that the State Fair grounds 
are to be located near Oak Park in Sacramento, it 
may not be premature for me to outline the plans of 
the Agricultural Directors in regard to the improve- 
ments to be made thereon, and their future policy 
concerning agricultural matters and the State Fair, 
subject, of course, to the action of the Legislature 
and the Governor's approval. 

"In the first place, it is the wish of the State Board 
of Agriculture to place every exhibit, attraction and 
exhibition as near as possible to the grandstand which 
is to be erected upon the new fair ground. In this 
way all exhibits can be seen conveniently for one 
admission and at the expense of one car fare, and that 
the affairs of the board can be conducted by one man- 
ager with one set of employee, one band and a big 
saving in many smaller items. 

"It is our hope to be able to construct upon the 
fair grounds such buildings as will be best adapted to 
the proper exhibition of stock and poultry surround, 
ing them with clean covered walks so that all may be 
seen and inspected without the public getting into 
dust and filth as heretofore has been the case. 

"A suitable building is needed uear the grandstand 
for the exhibition of manufactured articles and farm- 
ing and mineral products that will also be adapted for 
giving band concerts, entertainments, etc. 

"The grandstand will, when built, be much larger 
than the old one, containing a large section of reserved 
seats, and every effort will be made to make the en- 
tire seating convenient and comfortable and com- 
manding a good view of the parade grounds and 
track. 

"The location of the new fair grounds is such that 
it will not be necessary to do much grading in order 
to make a fine level race course of the regulation size, 
and the soil is exactly the kind most desired by 
breeders upon which to train and speed their horses. 

"As California has the besi bred and fastest horses 
in the world, the State should have the best and 
fastest race course upon which they can make their 
records. 

"In order to construct these buildings and build 
such a race course i*j will he necessary to have money, 
and this is about the way wo now stand financially 
and what will be necessary for our future needs: 

"Beginning with the sale of the old fair grounds for 
$82,500; $.'! 1,500 of this was used immediately in paying 
off liens and notes held by the bank and such other 
sums as were expended for abstract of title, attorney 's 
f^es and commissioner's fees. 

"Fifty-one thousand dollars that then remained 
was placed to the credit of the Agricultural Board in 
the State Treasury. 

"Under the Act passed by the Legislature at a 
former session allowing and providing for the sale of 
the old fai grounds it was stipulated that the money 
so obtained could only be used for the purpose of pur- 
chasing other fair grounds and making improvements 
thereon in Sacramento county. 

"This was a very proper provision, for the reason 
that the land contained in the old fair grounds never 
cost the State of California one dollar, but was 
donated by the people of Sacramento, and this $82,500 
is therefore, in fact, a gift to the State from the 
people of Sacramento. 

"Out of the $51,000 balance placed by the Directors 
in the State Treasury, $i2,000 has been expanded in 
paying for the eighty acres bought by the Directors 
near Oak Park for the new fair ground, leaving a net 
balance to be used on buildings, etc., to be placed 
thereon of $29,000, which willjgo far toward their con- 
struction. 

"Since settling the $31,000 of obligations I men- 
tioned as having been paid just after the sale of the 
old park, we find we have a debt remaining of less 
than $09,000. 

"Toward paying this the State, through its Legis- 
lature, appropriated soveral years ago $45,000 which, 
has never yet been Ured, nor can it yet be, although 
it practically is now lying in the State Treasury for 
that purpose, and will be available when the new fair 
grounds are deeded to the State of California by the 
Agricultural Society Directois, which will imme- 
' diately be doue. 

This $45,000, deducted from the $60,000 debt just 
mentioned, leaves a balance of debt cf $24,000 for the 
present Legislature to help us out with. 



"Now, President Rush and the other members of 
the Board of Agricultural Directors are haviDg pre- 
pared estimates of the cost of the improvements 
to be made on the new fair grounds These estimates 
are almost all completed, and when it is ascertained 
what that cost will be a bill will be presented to the 
Legislature sufficient to cover the $24,000 remaining 
indebtedness, and also the amount needed to complete 
improvements on the new park over and above the 
$29,000 balance now in the State Treasury for that 
purpose. 

"While the State Fairs of late have not been finan- 
cially successful, it must not be charged up against 
the people of Sacramento, as there have been several 
valid reasons for the shortage in receipts. One year 
the death of a President caused the directors to close 
the fair, and again bad weather had to be contended 
with. At times the expenses have been entirely too 
high, due largely to the necessity of givirg two shows 
under practically two different managements with two 
sets of employees, and partly to the fact that more 
attention has been given to running races, the book- 
makers and their following than to the merchants, 
the manufacturer, the miner, and, above all else, the 
farmer and stock breeder. 

"The present directors, whose employe I am, have 
given me positive instructions to run the affairs of the 
board mainly in the interests of the producers, and 
give every encouragement to the exhibition of stock 
and farm products, and the breeding and racing of 
harness horses. This I will do, without, at the same 
time, trying to discourage the breeding and racing of 
running horses, but I feel that so many racetracks 
are now in operation for long seasons each year that 
that branch of horse-racing has comparatively little 
need of aid from State Fairs, and should at our meet- 
ings be entirely self-sustaining. 

"It is pleasing to the Board of Directors and to my- 
self that the people of Sacramento county and the 
papers are offering us such cordial support in our 
efforts to rejuvenate matters pertaining to the State 
Agricultural Society. 

"With the $40,000 given some years ago by Sacra- 
mento towards constructing the Agricultural Pavilion 
on the Capitol grounds, and the $82,500 for which the 
old park sold, that property having been purchased 
by Sacramentans and given to the State Agricultural 
Society, it may be seen that the State Fair has 
received from the people of Sacramento in cold cash 
the immense sum of $122,500, a direct gift. 

"This, we believe, entitles them to liberalconsidera- 
t':on from California's representatives. 

"It will be the aim of the Agricultural Directors to 
give to the people a State Fair teat will be of great 
benefit to California as an advertisement and of direct 
benefit to every farmer, horticulturist, breeder and 
stock-raiser in the State.'' — Sacramento Union. 



Monterey 2:09 1-4 as a Sire. 

During the year just closed there were many high- 
ciass trotters and pacers raced in the United States, 
and the title of champion in any class was not ob- 
tained easily. Every horse that got a championship 
during the year was not only fast but of racehorse 
quality. It was, therefore, a great compliment to 
Mr P. J. Williams' stallion Monterey 2:09} when his 
son Irish, one of his first crop of colts, took a record 
of 2:08}, tha fastest mile pacea by a four-year-old dur- 
ing the year. To havo sired the best four-year-old of 
his year is a distinction that entitles Monterey to more 
credit than is usual, especially when it is known that 
he was not bred to over a half dozen mares the year 
Irish was begotten. Monterey is endowed with as 
much speed as any stallion that ever lived. Horsemen 
who saw him in training the year he was taken East 
by his owner are well aware of this fact. Quarters in 
30 seconds seemed easy for him, and he could out- 
brush some of the fastest pacers through the home- 
stretch at the end of miles below 2:10. No horseman 
who has ever seen Monterey at work questions the 
assertion that he is endowed with two minute speed. 

On breeding he stands in the very front rank. His 
sire, Sidney, is grafldsire of the fastest trotter ever 
foaled. His dam, Hattie by Commodore Belmont, is 
a great broodmare and is by a sire of greai brood- 
mares. His second dam is by Woodford Mambrino, 
whose daughters produced the great Kremlin 2:07}, 
Bonnatella and others; his third dam was by Norman 
25, whose daughter produced Norval, one of the very 
greatest sons of Electioneer, and his fourth dam was 
a daughter of that great thoroughbred, Grey Eagie, 
whose daughters have founded running and trotting 
families of superior merit. 

Monterey's racehorse qualities are well known. 
His fastest quarters wore always in the homestretch 
and he met the very best in the free-for-all class when 
he raced. He has finished in front of such horses as 
Galette 2:11}, Rex Alto 2:07}, Toggles 2:08}, Dr. Leek 
2:09}, Kentucky Union 2:07}, John Nolan 2:08, Klam- 



ath 2:07} and many others in the free-for-all classes. 

As a foal getter Monterey is not only sure, but his 
colts are all endowed with size, good looks and natural 
speed. The owners of foals by Monterey set great 
value on them, and confidently expect them to be 
money winners when raced. A gentleman who has 
been a student of horse breeding for thirty years re- 
marked the other day that he considered Monterey a 
stallion that would bring great fame to California 
within the next three years through the performances 
of his get, as he confidently expected him to have a 
half-dozen 2:05 or better performers within that time. 

Monterey is to be in the stud again this year on the 
same terms as last, and progressive breeders should 
patronize him. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

J. D. ANLOw, Butte, Montana — There is no horse 
registered by the name McKinley Wilkes, and no 
horse by that name has sired a staudard performer. 

W. F. Haney, Modesto — Miss Garvin is a bay mare 
foaled 1892, by Fellowcharm, dam Sally Hampton by 
Boots, second dam by Joe Daniels. She won two or 
three races as a three year-old . Rearguard, bay horse> 
foaled 1890, by Postguard, dam Alfonie Carter by 
King Alfonso. He was a frequent winner. 

R. M. Cook, Riverside, Cal.— Midnight's record 
made at Woodland in 1902 was 2:11}. It was made in 
the second heat of the 2:15 class pace, which race was 
won by Silver Coin. Doc Wilkes took the first heat 
in 2:12}, Midnight the second in 2:11} and Silver Coin 
the next three in 2:11}, 2:12, 2:13. 

M. B. Sweeney, Hanford— As there are a half- 
dozen trotting-bred mares and several thoroughbred 
mares by the name of Maggie Mitchell we will have 
to have more definite information as to which one 
you desire the pedigree of before we can give it. 

F. S. Dashiell, Santa Rosa— We do not know the 
present address of "Dr. Long, veterinary surgeon, of 
Oregon, who sold some fine horses in and about Santa 
Rosa some years ago." Perhaps some of our readers 
may be able to furnish this information. 



News From the North. 

[Portland Rural Spirit, Jan. 6.] 

William Hogoboom reports nearly fifty horses at 
the Walla Walla track this winter, all doing well. 

Perringer and Erwin, of Pendleton, were recently 
over and made arrangements to move their horses to 
the Walla Walla track in the near future. 

Dr Clowe has a good filly by Hogoboom's Teddy 
that is showing up fine, with very little work. 

C. E. Barrow's richly bred two-year-old stallion, 
Phal Smith 39259, is developing into a splendid horse. 
With very little work he showed a 24 gait last season 
Pretty good for a green two-year-old. 

Mr. Barrow's nice eight-monlhs-old bay filly, Pearl 
Mac, that he has entered in the California colt stakee, 
has already shown him a 3:20 gait 

Of all the parties breeding trotters about Walla 
Walla, perhaps no one takes a more active interest in 
the business than Mrs. Dooley. She loves a well-brer' 
horse and owns ten or fifteen head of the best ones in 
the valley. She owns the old Chas. Russell place 
which is the best farm in the Walla Walla valley. It 
contains 500 acres, 200 of which is first class alfalfa 
land. The place is watered by a beautiful creek and 
numerous springs and is only 3i miles out from Walla 
Walla. Her mares are mostly by Caution, all 
standard and registered and have colts by Teddy, son 
of Diablo; most of her mares are now in foal to Mr, 
Hogoboom's Linmont. She owns the good bay three- 
year-old filly Cleopatra, by Alexis, dam by Caution. 
She was worked a short time last spring by Mr. 
Hogoboom and wenta quarter in 34 and a half in 1:12. 

Mr. T. H. Ramsay, who owns the Oregon bred colt 
Al McKloney, by McKinney, out of Mary A., by Alta- 
mont, has placed him in Budd Doble's hands to train. 
This youngster trotted miles last year in his three- 
year-old form in 2:15 and he is looked upon as a 2:10 
performer this year. Alma Mack, whom Mr. Helman 
drove miles in 2:20 last season is a full sister to Al 
McKinney, and John Sawyer has a half sl6ter to him 
being sired by Zombro that has been dubbed the 
coming Lou Dillon. 

Kenney, the man who makes sulky wheels that are 
right and who sells the McMurray sulkies and carts 
as fast as the Ohio house can forward them to him, is 
distributing some very handsome calendars for 1905 
issued by the McMurray Company. A very handsome 
photograph of a big bunch of trotters racing through 
the stretch on a Grand Circuit track adorns the 
calendar. Send to Kenney for one. It will adorn your 
home or your stable. Kenney has also received the 
new McMurray 1905 catalogue, which he will be pleased 
to mail to you on application. He sold one of the 1905 
models this week to Mr. Middleton of Fresno. 



January 14, 1905] 



Quilt: gvve&ev uuf» ^port&mcm 



5 




Notes and News. 



Stall room is getting scarce at the Pleasanton track. 



"Jack" Curry will open a public training stable at 
San Jose. __ 

Ed Geers is now able to stand on his broken leg 
without the use of his crutch. 



Det Bigelow of Yolo county, owns a three-year-old 
filly by Diablo, dam Lucy B. 2:17 by Alex Button, 
that he says is the fastest three year-old trotter he 
ever pulled a line over. The filly is very handsome 
and very steady, knowing nothing but trot even when 
urged to her limit. 

Obio county fair associations have formed a protec- 
tive society along tbe lines of the National and Ameri- 
can Trotting Associations, the improvement of racing 
and racing conditions at Ohio fairs being the object in 
view. It is admitted that if the associations hang 
together tbey can do themselves a lot of good. 



Joe Cuicello will take his string of horses to Pleasan- 
ton, the first day of February. 

Barondale 2:11 J, now in Iowa, has already quite a 
number of fine mares booked to him for the coming 
season. . 

Hi Hogoboom added a new one to his Woodland 
string last week, a fast pacer owned by Mr. McDougal 
of Sacramento. 

Kinney Lou 2:07| rever looked so well in his life as 
he rtoes now and he is certainly one of the grandest 
looking trotting stallions in California. 



Thomas W. Lawson of Boston author, of "Frenzied 
Finance, " has booked five of the choicest mares at 
Dreamwold Farm to McKinney 2:11 J. 



Get your stallion advertised early. Several new 
ads appear this week and space has been reserved for 
many more to appear on the first of February. 

There is some chance it is said that McHenry will 
return to the trotters again this year, as he did not 
make a bushel of money with the runners last year. 



Kenney Manufacturing Company has a second hand 
McMurray Road Cart for sale at a bargain. It was 
used less than 30 days and is just as good as a new 
one. 

Louis Stock, of Fresno, and Joe Nightingale, of 
Cordelia, came to town this week and purchased Mc- 
Murray carts from the Kenney Manufacturing Com- 
pany. 

A Los Angeles advertiser offers for sale a two-year- 
old filly by McKinney. Its dam is a half-sister to 
Grace Kaiser the dam of Coney 2:02, etc. See adver- 
tisement. 

Under tbe new rules of the American Association a 
fine not to exceed $500 shall be imposed upon any 
member of the association on whose grounds there is 
allowed any suppression of time. 



From the talk of California and Oregon breeders 
Zombro 2:11 will get a large number of high-class 
mares this year. As a sire of good looks, size and 
speed, few stallions are his equal. 

W. G. Durf°e has nearly fifty horses ia his string at 
Los Angeles. He has quite a large class of two and 
three-year-olds, owned by different parties, besides 
many aged horses and tried campaigners. 

About a dozen youngsters by Chimes, McKinney, 
Oakland Baron and Rex Americus, and owned by 
Sterling R. Holt, are being wintered at Memphis, 
Tenn., in charge of Charles Mabrey. 



Terrace Queen 2:06 by Velpau and Zephyr 2:11 by 
Zombro, owned by J. C. McKinney, Titusville, Pa., 
will be raced on the Grand Circuit next season. They 
are being wintered at Memphis by Lafe Sbafer. 

Scott Hudson, who is visiting California this winter 
represented the Drivers Association before the Na- 
tional and American Trotting Associations last 
month, and secured considerable favorable legisla- 
tion. 

The Dixon, Solano county, half-mile track is in fine 
shape and preparations are already being made for 
the regular annual May Day races there. Some good 
horses have received their first lessons on the Dixon 
track. 

H. C. Hopkins, of Cleveland, who now owns the 
pacing mare Monica 2:15 by McKinney, thinks she is 
good enough to reduce ber record this year, and after 
breeding her to a good stallion will train her with 
that purpose in view. 

Geo W. McKinney 2:14}, a grand looking trotting 
stallion by McKinnej is offered for sale. See adver- 
tisement. Geo. W. McKinney took his record in a 
race in Denver in 1898, winning three good races at 
the Denver meeting that year. 

The new speedway will soon be one of the features 
of Golden Gate Park. A big body of graders and 
teamsters are now at work under the direction of Su- 
perintendent McClaren. The plans provide for a 
three-quarter mile oval track, sixty feet wide. 

One thousand and one mares were nominated in the 
Kentucky Futurity for foals of 1904. The December 
payments on the weanling foals numbered 873, or 
nearly 90 per cent of the original nominations. The 
stake is worth $22,000 and will be trotted in 1907. 



Mr. George H. Lent of Isleton recently sold for 
a good price to Mr. W. G. Harris of Dixon, a five-year- 
old dark bay colt by Don Marvin, dam by John Nelson. 
This colt is sixteen hands high, a beauty and a fine 
driver. Mr. Lent is disposing of all of his horses at 
private sale as will be seen by his advertisement in 
another columun. 

Mr. Geo. H. Lent of Isleton, advertises a number of 
well bred horses for sale in this issue, among them a 
couple of mares in foal that are nominated in the 
Breeders Futurity and a yearling entered and paid up 
on in the stake for foals of 1904. The aged horses are 
excellent prospects and are all well broken, good 
individuals and fine drivers. 



After much expensive litigation the courts have 
ruled that the historic old Pimlico racing plant in 
Baltimore must be sold and the proceeds distributed 
to State, city, county and personal creditors. Long 
years ago the State of Maryland bought the ground 
and donated it for the holding of fairs, but these were 
abandoned and trouble has ruled the property for a 
long time. 

La3t Saturday at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, 
Mr. John A. Cole of San Bernardino, saw his filly 
April Rose, go a half in 1:11 and a quarter in 34 sec- 
onds, driven by W. G. Durfee. April Rose was bred 
at Palo Alto Stock Farm and foaled in April, 1902. 
She is by McKinney, dam Sweet Rose (1) 2:25J by 
Electioneer. Mr. Durfee has been handling her but 
six weeks. 

Mr. F. S. Granger, of Santa Cruz, is the owner of a 
four-year-old that he calls Ben Hur. He is by Near- 
est 2:22 out of a mare by Nutwood that has been used 
on the road some but was never on a track but ten 
days. Mr. Granger drove him a quarter last Wed- 
nesday in 35 seconds flat hitched to a McMurray 
cart and believes he has one of the greatest prospects 
in California. 

Ouresteemed contemporary, the Country Gentleman, 
of Albany, New York, claims that the splendid article 
on the New York Horse Show from the pen of that 
well known writer on horse affairs, Will F. Pond, 
which appeared in a recent issue of the Breeder and 
Sportsm an, and several of the big dailies, was origi- 
nally written for its columns. It was a good article 
and Mr Pond has had due credit given him for writ- 
ing it, and the Country Gentleman is entitled to its 
share for engaging him to do the job. 



A reader of the Breeder and Sportsman sug- 
gests that the Breeders Association open the Cali- 
fornia Circuit this year at Fresno, and that meetings 
follow at Stockton, Pleasanton, San Jose, Oakland, 
Vallejo, Santa Rosa and Woodland in the order 
named. He suggests that the Woodland mueting be 
held the week before the State Fair at Sacramento, if 
one is given, and that the State Fair be held before 
the Oregon State Fair at Salem, giving those who 
want to go north a chance to race in California first. 
We would suggest that Los ADgeles hold the first 
meeting of the year and precede Fresno, if the above 
plan be adopted. 

A car left San Jose last week for Los Angeles con- 
taining two trotters consigned to W. G. Durfee the 
Los Angeles trainer. Ont of the horses was Mr. A. 
B. Spreckels'six-year old bay stallion Cronje by Cupid 
2:18, dam Hulda 2:08} by Guy Wilkes. This colt has 
considerable natural speed and in Mr. Durfee's hands 
should develop into a trotter of merit. He has always 
been kept on the Aptos ranch and has never been 
regularly trained. Tbe other trotter in the car was 
Mr. C. A. Durfee's good little twin Cuate 2:18 as a 
three-year-old. Cuate was sick last year anfl was not 
raced, but is now in good shape and with ordinary 
luck will be a 2:15 performer to a certainty. 

The horse loviBg residents of Lordsburg, California, 
have organized a gentlemen's club under the name 
San Jose Rancho Driving Club. A good regulation 
mile track is being built and every effort will be made 
to promote the interests of hoise breeding. The 
officers are: President, H. E. Walker, San Dimas; 
Secretary, J. ^alvio Soto, Lordsburg; Treasurer, F. 
S. Vigor, Pomona: Board of Directors, E. W. Hart, 
San Dimas, P. J. Yorba, Lordsburg, J. M. Sexton, 
Pomona, N. O. Fairfield, Ptmona, D. C. McCord, 
Covina The new club will hold matinees at various 
times during the year, and as several good horses are 
owned in the locality, hope to have seme good racing 
and arouse a lively interest in the ownership of high 
class trotters and pacers. 



Elmorine, the great great broodmare owned by 
William Hogoboom, of Walla Walla, broke a leg re- 
cently. A correspondent of the Rural Spirit says the 
leg is in a plaster mould, but the old mare's age is 
against her. Elmorine was bred by the late Capt. 
Ben E. Harris of this city, and is the dam of Lena A. 
2:21}, winner of the Occident Stake of 1899, Dos 
Minutos 2:30, winner of the Stanford Stake of 1898, 
Lorena 2:30 and Teddy 2:22}. Elmorine is by Elmo 
891, dam Princess by Woodford's Mambrlno. 



This is the season of the year when the compiler of 
trotting and pacing statistics has to depend upon the 
holiday numbers of the papers devoted to harness 
horse affairs. The Horse Review, Horseman, American 
Horse Breeder, Trotter and Pacer, and Horse World all 
issued numbers that were not only magnificently 
illustrated and full of good things, but contained 
tables and statistics that are absolutely indispensible 
to the editor and pedigree compiler, especially as the 
Year Book will not be issued for several weeks yet. 



In the Horse Show Monthly W. A. Dobson writes 
that he first bought the famous Lord Golden some 
twenty miles south of Fairfield, la , for $225 The 
horse was then entire. Mr. Dobson says the original 
name of Lord Golden was Acorn, sire Black Oak. 
dam by Egmont. He was sold to G. F. Gilman, Black 
Rock, Conn , by Mr. Dobson, but the purchaser died 
shortly afterwards. When next sold Lord Golden was 
bought in New York by T. E. Gordon, who later dis- 
posed of him to Dr. Wentz. Mr. Dobson also says 
that Lord Brilliant'ssire was a son of Egmont, miking 
the famous pair somewhat close in blood. 



An investigation is now under way by the American 
Trotting Association, which promises to develop into 
a sensation, It relates to certain records alleged to 
have been made over the famous kite-shape track at 
Independence, Iowa, and which it is said were faked. 



Down at the Baywood Stud Stables at San Mateo 
are eight head of horses (six geldings and two mares) 
sired by the prizo winning imported German Coach 
Horse Socrates, that are offered for sale. Thoy are 
all thoroughly broken, and have been accustomed to 
steam and electric cars and automobiles. Tbey were 
bred on Mr. John Parrott's Llano Seco Rancho at 
Chico, Butte county and are all in fino condition as 
they are putting on weight every day. A pair of 
blacks 16 2 that weigh 2900 pounds are especially 
suited for a hearse team. The others are splendid 
prospects and all can be seen any day in harness if 
desired. Thero are also for sale at Baywood Stud ton 
head of smaller and lighter horses by the same sire 
suitable for carriage work, single or double. We ask 
readers to peruse the advertisement on the second 
page of this issue whore these horses are described, 
and where other particulars in regard to thero sale 
are given* 



Mr. T. C. Cabney, the well known trainer, formerly 
of Eureka, Humboldt county, has just moved into 
one of the nicest new stables that has been built in 
the vicinity of Golden Gate Park, in this city. It is 
on 24th avenue and Fulton streets, adjoining the 
Casino, a popular roadside resort, and contains fifteen 
box stalls all arranged for the comfort of the equine 
occupants. Any of the car lines going to the Chutes 
will take one to Mr. Cabney's stables which are close 
to a Park entrance. He has several horses already, 
but desires a few more to either sell, board or train. 
A road horse, 16 hands, that he now has for sale can 
show a quarter in 32 seconds and is one of the best 
roadsters in San Francisco. Mr. Cabney will be glad 
to have horse owners and others interested in horse? 
visit his new place at any time. 



Frank G. Smith says: C. K. G. Billings has more 
than $300,000 invested in fine horseflesh for matinee 
racing. The cost of maintaining these trotters and 
pacers is placed at $100,000 per annum Mr. Billings 
is to be congratulated on his good judgment. I know 
of a wealthy gentleman who spent over $200,000 the 
past year in historic oil painting?, another a fortune 
in racing yachts which are nothing more than 
machines, and another swell bunches of money in 
automobiles, hunting parks, public libraries to be 
patronized by the rich, and all sorts of hobbies and 
fads. And who cares? Let the gentlemen have a 
good tim >, and the more money they put into circula- 
tion the better for the little fish. It is estimated that 
every third generation goes broke, anyhow, so what's 
the difference? Life is what we make it, so gaily let 
us take it. 

Alex Brown's Woodland Stock Farm track is get- 
ting a reputation as a winter training track that will 
cause it to be one of the most popular tracks in Cali- 
fornia during the season of the year when most t racks 
cannot be used for working horses on. It rained hard 
there a part of Thursday and nearly all day Friday of 
last week, yet on Sunday the track was in good shape 
to work on. Superintendent Chas. Spencer has 
finished a drainage ditch running along the inside 
fence and it drains the track perfectly. H. S. Hogo- 
boom, Al Charvo, F. E. Wright, R. Nason snd Mr. 
Spencer have been stepping the youngsters in their 
strings some this week and Woodland track never 
stabled a finer lot of young trotters and pacers 
Spencer stepped a two-year-old trotter b> Prince 
Ansel a 2:20 gait, and a yearling by Nusbagak a thirty 
gait, both hitched to carts. There is much interest 
in harness horses breeding in Yolo county this year 
and the stallions in service there will bo well 
patronized. ' 

Jack Curry, "Optimistic Jack" they call him over 
East, arrived in California a few wee ks ago with Mr. 
J De La Montanya's two fast mares, Tuna 2:08} and 
Brilliant Girl, and likes tbe country so well that be 
has decided to locate at San Jose in the spring and 
take a few outside horses to train and race. Mr. 
Curry has been on the trotting turf a good many 
years, and has trained and d r iven many of the very 
fastest. He trained and drove the pacer Carbonate 
2:09, tbe first two-year-old to beat 2:10. and gave Alix 
her five-year-old world 's record of 2:07ij in 1893. He 
campaigned that old hero Joe Patchen 2:01} and 
drove the California bred trotter Surpol 2:10, that he 
yet bel'oves would have been the fastest trotter on 
earth barring his several accidents Mr. Curry drove 
Tuna to her record. of 2:08} this year,but believes that 
Brilliant Girl will develop into a still faster mare. As 
will be seen by an advertise ment in this Issue, Mr. 
Curry's present address is 2605 Point Lobos avenne in 
this city, but he intends to move to San Jose track on 
the 15th of next month. He will take a few more 
horses to train, and if the owners desire will campaign 
them next season. 



3 



[January 14, 1905 



Classic Winners' "Figures." 

[Arbitrator, in London Sportsman.J 
In some quarters Bruce Lowe's "Figure Guide" is 
still regarded with disfavor, and it is noticable that 
those who do not like the figures are in nineteen cases 
out of twenty also opponents of the starting ga'e. 
There 19, of course, no connection between the two, 
save that both had their origin in Australia, but 
when one finds opponents of the one system opposing 
the other, it causes one to come to the inevitable con- 
clusion that we are the moat conservative nation in 
the world. Anything possessing a flavor of antiquity, 
no matter how worthless it may be, finds its legion of 
staunch supporters, who argue from the standpoint 
that what was good enough for our forefathers must 
be good enough for us, and they bitterly resent any 
casting down of fetishes. Our forefathers delighted 
in open sewers running down the centre of their 
streets and in cesspools and other unpleasant arrange- 
ments, and when the sanitary system of underground 
sewers was established it came in for much opposition. 
Charles Dickens, in one of his delightful articles in 
"Household Words" fifty odd years ago, gave a rare 
lashing to those who preferred the open sewers. The 
only innovation which has in recent years been almost 
at once accepted as good— and then only by the 
wealthier classes— is the motor car. This annihilates 
distance, but it is all the more a standing danger to 
the public. A more unsuitable vehicle for the crowded, 
cramped, narrow, and sinuous roads of Great Britain 
could not possibly hav9 been devised. 

Having got on the roads, let me step back on to the 
racecourse. Lord Durham's "Gimcrack" pronounce- 
ment in favor of the starting-g»te must have been 
bitter reading to those who prefer the obsolete "Hag" 
method and talk fondly of the perfect starts effected 
with the flag by the late Mr. MeGeorge. At times be 
was most successful, but other starts were dreadful. 
Reading of the late Mr. Sam Merry in connection 
with Warwick Races in "Truth," whose sporting 
column is generally amusing, if nothing else, I was 
reminded of one particular start at the meeting more 
than thirty years ago, when it took the starter, the 
deputy-starter, and Mr. Merry (who had charge of 
the advance flag) exactly seventy-five minutes to effect 
the start, and, even then, one jockey got bet.er away 
than the others and won the race. The starter was 
Mr. MeGeorge and the deputy-starter Mr. Tom 
Lawley. Turning up old files, one constantly finds 
almost similar cases, and assuredly the starting 
machine is infinitely better, admitted that it has its 
drawbacks. 

Now as to the "Figure Guide," which is a far better 
name for it than "System," the latter term being 
generally regarded as possessing absolutely hard and 
fast rules which admit of no deviation. The main idea 
of the 'Figure Guide" is this: In the first volume of 
the Stud Book (Part 1) appears a list of the earliest 
known mares, roughly about seventy in number. 
These mares are, with scarcely an exception, the 
source of the whole of our present day bloodstock. 
The family of the mare whose descendents Bruce Lowe 
found had won the most races he termed No. 1, the 
next best No. 2, and so on, until he had labelled the 
descendents of nearly fifty of the old time mares. He 
included all the Derby, Oaks and St. Leger winners, 
and also the winners of the Two Thousand and One 
Thousand Guineas up to 1894 (inclusive ) Since then 
ten years have sped, and, in order to see if the principle 
established by Bruce Lowe has stood the test of 
further time, I have got out a table showing the num- 
ber of winners of each of the five big three-year-old 
races, and also the total number of winners belonging 
to each family. The result proves most emphatically 
that the "Figure Guide" i6 not the will o' the wisp 
which ignorant people have stated it to be. There is 
no better test than an average table, whether it 
applies to life insurance, cricket, billiards, or to what 
one of the present day turf writers ha9 denounced as 
"the fantastical nonsense of breeding back to some 
Barb mare in the mediaeval ages" No.lfamily.it 
will be seen from my table, is still on top with a total 
of 79 successes. No. 3 family is second best at the 
moment, having won three more races than No. 2 
but slight disturbances of averages must inevitably 
occur periodically, as will be seen again in the case of 
No. 7 family, which has ousted No. 6 family from il« 
proper position. 

This is accounted for by the four No. 7 horses — 
Persimmon, Diamond Jubilee, Flying Fox and Wild- 
fowler— having between them won nine classics during 
the last ten years, while No. 6 family has won none at 
all during that period. Apart from slight deviations 
from the normal, the position of the first twenty 
families is well Jiaintained, the only exceptions being 
. 17 and 19, which have exchanged places with 22 and 
23. 

If we omit the Two and One Thousand Guineas' fig- 
ures, and confine the table strictly to the Derby, Oaks 



and St. Leger, the positions of the five best families 
are No. 1 and No. 2 jointly first with 45 winners apiece 
(there are many more broodmares of No. 2 family at 
the stud than of No. 1 family), No. 3 family comes 
third with 43 victories, 4 fourth with 31 and No. 5 fifth 
with 27. Nos. 6 and 7 are again transposed, the latter 
with 21 successes as against No. 6's 18. The sire 
families (Nos. 3, 8, 11, 12, 14), so-called because they 
produce a greater proportion of good stallions, are all 
well up in the first twenty. The five "running" 
families— (1), (2), 3, (4) and 5— have between them 
won 293, or considerably more than half, of the 565 
classic races, and this alone is conclusive proof that 
Bruce Lowe's system, or guide, is bot such fantastic 
nonsense as breeding from a stallion simply because 
he lives next door. 



Position 




Total Victo- 




ICOO 






St. 


of 


lirucc Lowe's 


ries in 


2000 






Fuxoi ! v. 


Family No. 


Classic Rac's Gs. 


Gs 


Derby Oaks Lege 




(') 


79 


18 


16 


15 


18 


1 v 


J 


3 


67 


10* 


14 


16 


14* 


13 


3 


(2) 


61 


10 


9 


9 


17* 


19 


4 


V* } 


50 


8 


11 


8 


11 


12 


5 




33 


3 


3 


10 


10 


7 


6 


(?) 


29 


5 




12 


2 


7 


7 


6 


22 


3 


1 


11 


5 


2 


81 
») 


8 


20 


3 


3 


3 


3 


8 


9 


20 


3 


3 


5 


3 


6 


10 


12 


19 


6 


4 


1 


6 




11 


13 


16 


3 


3 


5 


3 


2 


12 


10 


15 


3 




5 


4 


3 


13 


14 


13 


2 


1 


3 


3 


4 


14 


16 


12 


3 


2 


2* 


3 


2 


lb 


11 


11 


3 


1 


3 


1 


3 


16 


18 


10 


2* 


1 


3 


3 


1 


17 


15 


9 






3* 


1 


5 


181 


20 


8 




2 




3 


3 


19' 


22 


8 


1 


3 


2 


2 




20 f 


23 


8 


1 


1 


1 


4 


1 


21 I 


26 


8 


3 


1 


1 


2 


1 


22 | 
23)" 


17 


7 


2 






2 


3 


19 


7 


3 








3 


24 


25 


6 




3 


2 


1 




25 


27 


8 


1 


3 


1 . 




1 


26 


21 


5 




1 




3 


1 


27) 


29 


3 










2 


28)' 


31 


3 


1 


1 






1 


291 


28 


2 








1 




30^ 


30 


2 






I 






31) 


34 


2 










2 


32 


24 


1 










I 


33 


32 


1 








1 




34 


38 


1 






1 






35 


45 


j 




1 














196 


91 


t!25 


tl26 


127 



*Dead heats in respectively Two Thousand Guineas. Derby and 
Oaks. tOne has been deducted from the total owing to a dead 
heat making the winners in excess of the actual number of 
races won. _ 

Tiverton Sweet Marie Duels for 1905. 

[American Horse Breeder.] 
When William Garland, owner of Sweet Marie 2:04^, 
visited New York soon after the close of last season 
he called on Tiverton 2:04 J , at the private stable of 
that horse's owner, Mr. A. B. Gwathmey. The cir- 
cumstance led some to believe that the owners of 
these two fast trotters also met, and that a series of 
match races had been suggested. This was mere 
rumor, of course, but it shows that a'r^ady the public 
is interested in what may happen when these two 
noted trotters next meet. 

It appears, however, that Mr. Garland and Mr, 
Gwathmey did not meet — the latte- gontlemon being 
responsible for the statement. Mr. Gwathmey was 
seen last week on the floor of the Cotton Exchange, of 
which he is president. Notwithstanding the fact that 
the frenzied brokers were making the room ring with 
their shouts, and that members of his own firm were 
engaged in transactions ranging in the thousands, 
Mr. Gwathmey threw off the mantle of business to 
talk about his favorite horse, and until the interview 
was at an end did not pay the slightest attention to 
things around him. His voice was, of necessity, 
pitched at a higher key than is usually the case — one 
had to talk loud to be heard in the din, caused by a 
slump, bordering on a panic, that caused the failure 
of one firm. Of course the question had to come, it 
was the most natural thing in the world. "What are 
yonr plans concerning Tiverton for another season, 
Mr. Gwathmey? " 

"I have hardly decided," was the reply. "It is a 
little too early, but I have given the matter some 
consideration. Last season, you know, I did not 
expect to campaign Tiverton very extensively, but 
my driver, John Howell, though so well of him that 
I was bound to give him a chance. The horse is get- 
ting regular jogging work, the same as he has had for 
several winters past. Plans for another season will 
depend on a number of things. Much will depend on 
whether Tiverton and Sweet Marie both stay sound. 
Everything seems to be in the favor, present con- 
ditions being considered. " 

"Do you think the associations will offer a 2:05 class 
next season?" wa« asked. 

"That of course remains to be seen. I am inclined 
t > think that even if the associations do offer such a 
class the purses will be so small that a person could 
not depend on them alone to make a 2:05 trotter a 
paying proposition." 

"A series of matches between Sweet Marie and 
Tiverton has been suggested. Would you be in favor 
of something of that kind?" 

"I am always willing to race my horse when he is 
in shape to race. I believe that a match between the 
two would be quite a drawing card, especially after 



they had come together once or twice. They aie 
evenly matched and I look for both to race close to 
two minutes, barring the proverbial accidents. I 
think it would pay the associations to hang up a purse 
for a match between the two. It was done when Star 
Pointer and Joe Patchen were in their prime." 

Mr. Gwathmey 's confidence in Tiverton is not mis- 
placed. Only two geldings have ever trotted faster — 
Major Delmar 1:69} and The Abbot 2:03}— the former 
sold for $40,000, the latter for $26,500 at auction 
Tiverton now holds the following world's race rec- 
ords: Fastest mile (2:04J ) ever trotted by a gelding 
in a race; fastest second heat (2:04A) ever trotted; 
fastest two consecutive heats ever trotted by a geld- 
ing; Tiverton also trotted the fastest mile in a race 
during 1904; and holds the record for the classic 
Transylvania. 

The Year's Mortuary List. 

Since the openiDg of the year just passed, many 
noted men and horses have passed from life. Death 
was very iiusy among the breeders, as there was 
called away John L. Mitchell of Wisconsin; D. W. 
Brenneman, A. J.Caton and Chas. S. Dole of Illinois; 
Howard T. Cunningham of Iowa; James C. Howland, 
Chas. H. Kerner and Capt. B. H. Tuthill of New York; 
R. W. Davis of Ohio; J. Malcolm Forbes of Mas- 
sachusetts; R. H. Plant of Georgia; and Robert Steel 
of Pennsylvania. Of the drivers, Allie Trout and 
John Riley of Massachusetts, and Geo. A. Fuller of 
Tennessee. Others identified with the harness horse 
interest were: Alex Newburger and John B. Sage of 
New York; W. S. Frazier of Illinois; Chas. H. Page 
of Philadelphia; and Thos. J. Vail of Connecticut. 

Of the record horses, the most prominent were the 
trotters The Abbott 2:03} ; Swift 2:07; Kentucky 
Union 2:07}; Grattan Boy 2:08; Boodle 2:12J; New 
York Central 2:13J; Director 2:17, and Barada 2:22}. 
Pacers, Chehalis 2:04}; Oscar 2:08}; Doc Sperry 2:09; 
Dry Monopole (Dick Wilson) 2:08, and Mascot Jr, 2:10}. 

Of the sires of note, Steinway 2:25:}; Hamlin's Al- 
mont2:26; Acolyte 2:21; Henry F. 2:09i{; Royal Fear- 
naught 1501; Dexter Prince 11363; Altar2:16}; Arsaces 
6506; Nuncio 2955, and Prince Medium 2156. 

Great broodmares, Beautiful Bells, China Wilkesi 
Athalie, Gypsy by Gen. Booth, Modjeska by Enfield, 
and Welcome Bunker. — Horse Revitw. 



American Shetland Pony Club. 

Three hundred and fifty-three pedigrees of Shetland 
ponies were registered la9t year with the secretary of 
the American Shetland Pony Club. No less than 5287 
Shetland stallions and mares have been registered by 
the club in its various volumes This does not include 
the large numbers of geldings that are in use by 
children all over this country, but is merely a recoid 
of the breeding stock which is used to produce this 
most popular child 's pony . The rules of registration 
are strict. They guarantee both purity of blood and 
correctness of type. No pony over forty-six Inches 
high will be registered, even though his blood lines be 
unquestionably pure. 

Fifteen new members were admitted to the club last 
year, anu at the recent annual meeting at Chicago 
eight new members were accepted. The membership 
is nearly 200 and constantly growing, and every one 
who is identified with the production of these little 
ponies should be a member of the American Shetland 
Pony Club. 

For some years Chas. E. Bunn, who was judge 
ponies in the breeding classes at the recent New York 
Horse Show, has been president of the club, but he 
asked that the honor be passed about among other 
members of the club. Others were thus chosen: 
President, J. J. Milne, Monmouth, 111., vice-president, 
Robert Lilburn, Emerald Grove, Wis.; secretary 
treasurer, Mortimer Levering, LaFayette, Ind.; 
corresponding secretary, W. R. Goodwin, Jr., Naper- 
ville, 111. Directors: George A. Hey 1, Washington, 
111 ; Logan Black, Jacksonville, 111.; James B. Harri" 
son, Columbia City. Ind., and S. C. Pletcher, Lowell, 
Ind. m 

Grattan Boy 2:08 is dead, having succumed to an at- 
tack of impaction of the bowels a few days ago. 
There have been few faster trotttrs, and surely none 
gamer than this handsome son of Grattan 2:13. As a 
race horse the turf has not known many bis equal, 
and among trotting stallions the mighty Cresceus 
alone deserves a place above bim. Grattan Boy's 
turf career covers /our campaigns, and in the two 
years he raced down the Grand Circuit he endeared 
himself to every follower and earned a name that will 
live long. In all he started in 40 races, winning just 
an even half of them, and only four times did he finish 
behind third money — Exchange. 

The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms, private baths, telephone 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 

Strike!— if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it. 



January 14, 19C5 j 



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THOROUGHBREDS. 

7lT7»7T»77f« if* 7f* 'if* 'if* if* i»* if* if* if* if* if* if* if* '■♦■* 

The latest, from the seat of turf war in the Middle 
West is to the effect that Worth (Chicago) aDd Union 
Jockey Clubs (St. Louis) will join hands with Ed 
Corrigan and his friends in the formation of a new 
circuit and a new governing turf body. The follow- 
ing cities will, therefore, be represented: Chicago, 
with Worth and Hawthorne; St. Louis, by Union 
Park; Louisville, by Churchill Downs; Nashville, with 
Cumberland Park; Hot Springs, with Essex Park; 
and New Orleans by the new course projected by H. 
D.Brown. Mr. Corrigan declares that four-fifths of 
the owners, trainers and riders identified with Middle 
Western and Southern racing will flock to his stand, 
and, in short, declares "the Western Jockey Club is 
oeaten now." From a conservative warrior like Mr. 
C. such a declaration will carry a lot of weight. 
Certain it is that he has a large following. The New- 
port track had a representative at a recent meeting 
of the dissatisfied track owners and turfmen, and 
Cincinnati will either be represented in the circuit by 
Newport or Latonia As I predicted, Governor Jeff 
Davis, of Arkansas, a great friend of Capt. R. R. Rice, 
of Varner, delivered his ultimatum to the Western 
Jockey Club so far as tracks in Arkansas are con. 
cerned, which is to the effect that the horses of Capt. 
Rice will be allowed to race over any of the tracks of 
his home State or there will be no racing by anybody 
over any of them for a very long period; that Capt. 
Rice is a gentleman, and those who are endeavoring 
to "bold up" competition with a racing trust as a 
weapon will call down upon their heads the official 
wrath of the legislators in the near future if they do 
not change their plans in keeping Capt. Rice out. 
Word was expected from New Orleans as to the pians 
proposed for the new track, but if any were formu- 
lated they were not made public. 



racing to suit a lot of loud-mouthed pencilers in this 
part of the world who shout that the plan is "too 
slow" and "quick action is desired in America." 

Ralph H. Tozer. 



The Pacific Jockey Club, at a meeting last Tuesday, 
ratified the previously announced dates for Seattle 
and Portland. Kenilworth Park, Petaluma, is given 
twelve days at the conclusion of the Oakland meeting. 
The matter of Jockey Willie Knapp's contract was 
not decided, and will not b6 until the papers come 
from New York. Puerl WilkersOn, who claimes the 
services of the clever lad, submitted a copy of the 
contract. The new California Jockey Club stock- 
holders met on the same date and re-elected the 
present officers. 

Up to last Tuesday Bell Reed was the leader as to 
races won at the Oakland meeting, with seven to his 
credit. Sad Sam, Pelham and Honiton had each 
captured five. Sad Sam won five ouj of six and was 
third, Pelham five out of seven wins and one second, 
Honiton five out of eight wins and three seconds. Sir 
Wilfred, by Ossary,is the best two-year-old uncovered 
up to date. True Mr. A. B Spreckels' Daruma beat 
him on the occasion of his first start, but the fiily 
beat the gate by several lengths, and when the 
Cameron and Spreckels youngster met again he 
turned the tables on her quite decisively, running 
three and one-half furlongs in 0:41 J with 115 lbs. up. 
These youngsters seem to be head and shoulders 
above anything in the baby line, but many a good 
youngster in training here has not faced the barrier 
up to this time. 

The setting down of Jockey Travers except so far 
a3 the horses of H. E. Rowell are concerned seems to 
have cleared the atmosphere mightily, and the boy 
can account himself exceedingly fortunate that he 
was not ruled off for life for several of his rides at 
Oakland. Other boys who came in for not a little 
condemnation from race-goers of late are J. Jones and 
Greenfield, though the latter has improved somewhat 
the last few days. 

Jockey Hildebrand will probably ride at Hot 
Springs in the near future, and Ascot Park turf 
patrons have probably seen the last of ths great rider, 
who was terribly wrought up over the disciplining by 
Judge Hamilton. The latter plays no favorites, and 
is making a name for himself in meting out justice in 
the Southern metropolis. 



I never expect to see the totalizator come in to general 
U9e in this country, as it has in New Zealand and in 
several parts of Australia, but it would clear the rac- 
ing ozone of numerous foul smells hereabouts were it 
to take the place of the bookmaker. It is nothing 
that raclDg clubs in the Colonies have been enabled to 
increase the size of purses at least fifty per cent in the 
last ten years and that they have the squarest racing 
in the known world, that the odds are better and that 
theclubs would make considerably more money. They 
simply make too honorable a proposition out of horse- 



From Los Angeles. 

There has been quite a shaking up here during the 
last week amongst jockeys and trainers owing to the 
rigorous action of Judge Hamilton who is not disposed 
to overlook any irregularities in the running of horses. 
Jockey Lawrence wa9 the first one to incur a suspen- 
sion for an indefinite time as the result of the manner 
in which he has been riding of late. This boy's work 
in the saddle at this meeting has been of the most 
slovenly and careless kind, but at first no suspicion 
of any dishonesty was attributed to him. Close watch- 
ing, however, revealed the fact that there was some- 
thing radically wrong and the suspension followed a 
warning which was given him some time ago. Judge 
Hamilton hopes to be able to get at the man who is 
supposed to be behind him in his operations. It is 
sincerely to be hoped that the judges are successful in 
getting to the root of this evil as it is clear that no 
boy pulls horses for the mere sake of doing so, and if 
the proper persons are reached and summarily dealt 
with, as they should be, there would be no element of 
dishonesty to deal with in the racing of horses. 

The second race last Wednesday was the occasion of 
the ruling off of the mare Nellie May and her trainer. 
She was sent to the post in heavy training shoes, 
which was sufficient to cause the ruling. 

The first race also brought a package of grief to 
Tangible and owner. Tangible opened favorite and 
was heavily backed and trainer St. Vincent allowed 
the mare to go to the post with a very bad leg. The 
leg was bandaged and when Judge Hamilton asked 
what was the matter with it the trainer answered, 
"Nothing whatever." Tangible ran a disgraceful 
race, and on examination a gaping wound was found 
under the bandage. For wilfully deceiving the judge 
and allowing his mare to start in an unfit condition, 
St. Vincent and the mare were indefinitely suspended. 

Tim Payne was claimed out of a selling race by L. A- 
Bonseck for $1325 last week and in retaliation Bon" 
ser-k's mare Blissful was run up $1000 above her en- 
tered price in the race in which she was the winner. 

Jockey Hildebrand is still sulking over the fine of 
$100 which was imposed upon him for rough riding, 
aud is not riding any more at present; his absence 
from the saddle is not particularly noticeable and the 
various owners who have heretofore employed him 
seem td find no difficulty in getting competent pilots 
for their horses. 

Last Saturday Harry Stover's horses had their 
inning when both Kenilworth and Edinborough from 
his stable were winners. Kenilworth seems to have 
recovered his old time form and ran one of his races 
standing alongand hard drive and winning by a head 
in 1:13J for the full six furlongs. Cruzados also ran a 
sensational race; breaking flat footed behind his field 
he soon went to the front, stepping the first half-mile 
in iQ\ seconds and finishing the six furlongs in 1:12£, a 
new track record. Several horsemen who timed him 
from the ground caught the time better than 1:12 and 
one of the watches in the timers' stand wasstopped at 
1:11 1-5, but as the timers disagreed the slower time 
was hung out. This horse is better now than he ever 
was in his life. Mr. Cooke who is training him says 
he will not run him any more at this meeting, but 
after breeding him to a f6w mares in the spring will 
ship him to New York to race there during the sum- 
mer. 

The Pasadena Handicap, one mile and a furlong, 
was won by Oxford, a grey three-year-old colt by 
Faraday-Aunt Belle and owned by Jas. McLaughlin 
the jockey. Oxford made a show of his field, running 
in the lead throughout and forcing a fast pace from 
the time of entering the back stretch until the finish 
was reached. Heather Honey, a greatly improved 
mare, lightly weighted with 87 lbs was second, one 
length away and Ethylone was an indifferent third, 
Fossil, the favorite, finished fourth. This is the first 
time that Oxford has been asked to go a distance and 
the manner In which ho won this race stamps him as 
a promising Derby candidate. 

Oxford was heavily backed and his victory put a 
crimp in the bank rolls of most of the books, espe- 
cially that of the Butto Club. This book took all tho 
Oxford money offered them and gambled against his 
chances; his winning stopped their career at the 
track. 

It rained hard here on Monday and Tuesday and 
the mudders had their inning, at least all of them 
except Andrew Mack; this hor6e ran a most wretched 
race on his first start being beaten fully two hundred 
yards in a mile on a dry track. His next effort was in 
the mud when he simply "walked in" and the changed 
oondition of the track was given as an excuse for his 
remarkable reversal of form also for the fact that bo 



was backed as "if the race had been run the nigh 
before"; he then ran another bad race in the dry aim 
on Monday a still worse one in his favorite going. On 
this occasion he was in odds-on favorite and finished 
away back His owner is to have an opportunity to 
explain to the judges how it all happened, and no 
doubt his explanation will make very interesting 
reading when It is published. 

Geobge B. Kelley. 



James Creeley of this city has purchased from Mr. 
W. E. Cotton the thoroughbred stallion Chapel by 
Wadsworth, dam Modjeska by Buckmaster. Chapel 
is a bay horse foaled in 1901, and has run several very 
creditable races during the past two years. He was 
entered in the Burns' Handicap and other big races 
for this year, but ruptured a tendon a few weeks ago 
and was sold to Mr. Creeley who recognized his value 
as a stock horse, and also took into consideration the 
fact that a year's rest may restore his ailing legs so 
that he will do to race again. On breeding and looks 
he is surely a high class hor. e, and could be used to 
improve the stock of horses in several sections of this 
State where no horse of his calibre is now owned. 

Breeding Show Horses. 

The growing popularity and extension of horse 
shows presents the possibility of a great industry. 
Nearly every city of 100,000 or more inhabitants new 
maintains an annual horse exposition, where a decade 
ago such events were restricted to New York, Chicago 
and other cities of the first class. Horse shows have 
become the most fashionable function among the 
leaders of society, and suoh aff lirs are patronized by 
the wealthiest peoplein the nation. Among the causes 
operating to popularize and increase the value of fine 
horses, horse shows are paramount says the Drover's 
Journal. As the ability to win honors or even com- 
plimentary commendation demands animals of high 
quality, the breeding of such prize-winners should 
prove a profitable bianch of the equine industry. 

At the present time there is no establishment 
specifically devoted to raising show horses. The 
animals that have achieved the widest renown in the 
harness classes were Standard-bred trotters. A few 
notable ring champions were also Hackney animals, 
and others had a strong infusion of Thoroughbred 
or French Coach horse blood. But the enterprise of 
breeding directly for show animals has never been 
undertaken by a fancier. The feasibility of such an 
enterprise is unquestioned. Show animals are not 
equine freaks, but performers approximating per- 
fection in conformation and action. They represent 
the exceptions to a general rule. Breeders who aim 
to raise choice harness horses occasionally produce a 
show animal. Yet is it not possible to develop a class 
of horses that shall become distinguished for personal 
beauty and attractive action? It would not be a con- 
travention to the laws of breeding to consummate 
such an undertaking. 

Show animals cannot be produced by promiscuous 
breeding operations. The foundation stock of a 
show horse breeding establishment must comprise 
approximate perfection. The proprietor of a show 
horse stock farm will need to make his selections from 
such trotting families as have won a reputation for 
individual excellence. Many families are renowned 
for extreme speed, and as fast performers have been 
the best sellers, breeders have sought to produce a 
champion speed performer rather than a champion 
show animal. Some strains of breeding, like the 
Daniel Lamberts, Manibrino Palchens and Clays, 
were celebrated for faultless proportions. Mambrino 
King, King Rene and Nelson achieved renown in the 
show ring, as well as tho sires of speed. 

If two sires were selected of the most approved type 
and from families of natural equine beauty and bred 
to the right kind of mares, and the resultant foals 
crossed back to opposite, sires, a show breed of ani- 
mals might be established. Mares that produced 
superlative offspring should be retained in the harem, 
and dams that dropped only ordinary quality foals 
should be discarded. Tho evolution of a breed of 
show animals is reasonably within tho purview of 
possibilities. It could not be consummated in one 
equine generation, but a course of experimentation 
within the principle^ of methodical selection will 
assuredly achiove success. It is a consummation as 
easily attained as the development of the present 
breeds. Intelligence and perseverance, with the 
proper foundation 6tock, will establish a breed of 
show animals as certainly as other breeds havo been 
evolved by patient application of the methodical laws 
of reproduction. 

P. H. McEvoy of Menlo Park is offering two hand- 
some t'rinca Airlie stallions for sale— Milbrae (trot- 
ting record 2:16}) and Menlo Boy 3741. For particu- 
lars see ad vertisement. *tf 



8 



[January 14, 19(5 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

1 




Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Rod. 

Jan. 1-July 1 —Close season for black bass. 

April l-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season (or taking steel- 
nead in tidewater. 

Aug. 15-April 1— Open season for lobsters and orawflsh. 

Sept. I-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Sept. 10-Oct 16 -Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide- 
water. 

Nov. 1-Aprll I— Trout season closed 
Nov. l-Sept. 1 — Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
jage hen. 

Oct. I5-Feb. 15— Open season .'or quail, ducks, etc. 
Nov. 1-July 15— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 
1905. 

Jan. 19 30— Bay State Co-operative Bench Show Association. 
Lynn, Mass. Tom B Middiebrooke, Clerk. 

Jan. 24 26 Rhode Island Kennel Club. Providence, R. I. H. 
M. French, Secretary. 

Jan 25, 28— National Fanciers and Breeders Association. 5th 
annual show. Chicago. W. K. L. rules. T A. Howard, Superin- 
tendent Chicago, Ills. 

Feb. 13, 16— Westminster Kennel Club. New York City. Robt. 
V. McKim, Secretary. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb. 21, 24— New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass. Wm. B. 
Em-ry Secretary. H E. Gero, Show Secretary. 

March 21. 24— Buffalo KennelClub, Seymour P. White.Secretary. 

March 29-Apr. 1— Long Island Kennel Club. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jos M Dale, Secretary. 

March 8, 11— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania- 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred'k S. Stedman, Stcretary. 

April 19, 22— Atlantic City Kennel Club. Atlantic City, N.J. 
Thos H. Terry, Secretary. 

May San Francisco Kennel Club show. 

Field Trials. 
1905 

American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 

Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, wbose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 

Jan. 9— Pacific Coast Field Trials Club. Bakersfleld, Cai. 
Albert Betz, Secretary, 201 Parrott Bldg., San Francisco, Cal. 

Jan 9— Texas Field Trials Club. 3rd annual trials. Near San. 
Antonio, Tex. T. A. Ferlet, Secretary, San Antonio, Tex. 

Jan. 10— Georgia Field Trial Association. Albany, Ga. P. M. 
Essix, Secretary, Atlanta, Ga. 

Jan. 16— United States Field Trials Club. Grand Junction, 

enn. W. B Stafford, Secretary-Treasurer, Trenton, Tenn. 



Hunting in Royal Preserves. 

The time of year which King Edward like3 best of 
all is that which affords him the most abundant 
opportunities for the practice of his favorite sport of 
shooting. Both at Sandringham and the country 
seats of his friends he is constantly busy with his gun 
among the pheasants and other game. Among the 
best sportsmen of the country the King has the 
reputation for being one of the keenest shots of them 
all. He likes most of all to bang away at an overhead 
"rocketer," and rarely misses. 

The gunroom at Sandringham is one of the finest in 
England. It is lined with glass cases containing a 
variety of weapons for every conceivable purpose, and 
yet complete as it is there is rarely a year but the 
King adds some new gun to it, the special points of 
which have taken his fancy. The King's guns are, of 
course, hammerless, and are quite plain and unorna- 
mented, while their distinguishing feature is that they 
have a very light pull on the left trigger. 

The gameroom, also, where the spoils of the day's 
shoooting are temporarily preserved, is a very won- 
derful department, and it is said that there is only one 
in the world — that established by the late Baron 
Hirsch, which is capable of containing 10,000 head of 
game at the same time — which is bigger than it. 
About 0000 head can be comfortably stored in it at 
once. 

Most elaborate arrangements are made in advance 
for a good pheasant shooting season on the King's 
estates. At Sandringham, under the care of the head 
keeper, 10,000 pheasants are bred every year. The 
eggs are first of all placed in incubators, and shortly 
belore hatching time comes on they are removed and 
laid under 1000 barndoor fowls. When they are 
hatched they are arranged in pens and carried on 
trolleys, especially made for the purpose, all over the 
estate, each farm being required to keep, rear and 
grain-feed a certain number of them. So well and 
thoroughly is this done that when the autumn comes 
there are not finer pheasants in Great Britain than 
those which fly on the King's preserves, so white and 
tender is their flesh and bo wonderfully plump are 
thev. 

One of the King's shooting parties usually consists 
of about eight or ten gutis, and every man belonging 
•to it is invariably a first-rate shot, lor the King him- 
self, being such a good marksman, finds it difficult to 
tolerate mediocrity in this respect in others. Besides, 
it ie well remembered that many years ago his majesty 
on one occasion received a good many pellets in his 
clothing from the gun of a very reckless and careless 
sportsman, who was quite oblivious to the safety of 
future crowned heads so long as he was permitted to 



fire away at the game in his own fashion. Never in 
his life has the King injured any one, or come at all 
near to doing so. 

When the King and his friends are going out shoot- 
ing, notice is given the day before all over the estate, 
and farm work, except that which can be quietly and 
unobtrusively pursued, is then practically suspended 
for the day. Even the country folk are warned to 
keep clear of the lanes. The keepers turn out in the 
royal livery of green and gold, and the hundred 
beaters wear picturesque smocks, with hatbands of 
scarlet. Mr. Jackson, the head keeper, finally goes 
ovnr the whole of the ground to see that all is in apple 
pie order, and that tbe game carts are properly dis- 
posed at those points where the guns are expected to 
be busiest. 

On such a morning the King does not usually break- 
fast with bis guests, but leaves everyone to do just 
as he likes so long as he arrives at the meeting placeat 
the appointed hour, wnich is most frequently between 
10 and 1 1 o'clock. As soon as the King appears on the 
scene the shooting begins. Each sportsman works 
with from two to four guns two loaders constantly 
preparing them for him. 

The King of late has taken to using a little cob to 
carry him from point to point when any distance has 
to be traversed, and he always takes with him a little 
one legged shooting stool, for resting during a weary 
wait, at which times he will usually regale his guests 
with a good story from his own inimitable collection. 
The lunch in the middle of the day, either taken in 
the open air, at a farmhouse or in a special apartment 
at Wolferton station, is always very substantia), but 
quite plain, a kind of Irish stew, to which the King is 
very partial when out shooting, frequently making 
its appearance on the menu 

Tbe guns cease fire at 4 o'clock. It often happens 
on the occasion of a really big shoot that from 2000 to 
3000 head of game will be accounted for. At the close 
of the day their numbers, down to a single pheasant, 
are entered in the game book, which has been kept 
very accurately ever since shooting beg«n at Sand- 
ringham. It shows that from 1870 to 1880 between 
0800 ond 8700 head of game were shot every year, and 
that thenceforth the bags largely increased, until in 
the winter of 1885 no fewer than 10,000 head were ac- 
counted for. After a day 's shoot the results of it are 
always spread out on the lawn for his majesty's in- 
spection before dinner. Then they are sen i to hospitals, 
charitable Institutions, his majesty 's friends and the 
tenantry. 

It may not be generally known that there is scarcely 
any form of game, big or small, which the King has 
not shot in his time. He has shot elephants when in 
Ceylon, and according to the prescribed custom he 
personally cut off the tail of the first onethat he killed. 
When he was in India he shot leopards, cheetahs and 
tigers, and was amazingly skilful and daring in doing 
so. 

On one occasion he shot six tigers in one morning, 
two of them being killed outright with single shots 
from his gun. He set his heart on shooting a crocodile 
when he was in Egypt, and in order to accomplish his 
purpose he spent many days in anxious search for one, 
repeatedly being out of bed at 4:30 o'clock in the 
morning, and lying half an hour later in sand holes or 
in the mud on the banks of the Nile. At last he shot 
a beauty. He stayed up the whole night through on 
several occasions in a most anxious endeavor to add a 
hyena to his bag, but he failed, and it is the only 
thing that tbe King has ever wanted to shoot and not 
shot. 



Sport With the Butter Fish. 

With California anglers there is always "something 
doing" the year round. From the following account 
in the Los Angeles Times ealt water fishermen contrive 
to get some sport ai d much recreation during January 
outing days at the oceau side fishing resorts: 

Sea anglers who at present find their chief pleasure 
in the pursuits of pompano, or butter fish as some 
fishermen call tbem, and the other small fish which 
now abound in San Pedro Bay may be glad to learn 
how these really gamy and toothsome little creatures 
can be taken in a manner more sportsmanlike than 
the snag-hook butchery which during the last two 
weeks has corrupted more than one brother of the 
angle, who heretofore has borne a spotless record for 
piscatorial fair play. 

In snagging pompano there is no sport other than 
the satisfaction of getting them — a poor reward indeed 
to any man who deserves that highest title of 
American nobility — a sportsman. The feeble wigglings 
of the poor little fish as it vainly tries to rid its tiny 
body of a murderous grab hook are really pitiful, and 
it is indeed strange that anybody with the right spirit 
would even attempt such a practice if the quarry 
sought could by any exercise of patience or persever- 
ance, be persuaded to "bite" in the good old way. 

This is not a very at duous task with pompano, in- 
asmuch as the pretty little things are perennially 
hungry and generally willing to give the light-rodster 
a keen run for his money, providing he goes about his 
work in the proper manner. In common with most 
varieties of game fish, the pompano is shy, and the 
finest of tackle is most likely to persuade it to 
relax vigilance in the quest of food, which after all is 
a fish's most important vocation in life, just as it is 
of some creatures considerably higher in the natural 
scale. 

The manufacture of a pompano leader is quite a 
job and one involving considerable knowledge of silk- 



worm gut and its manipulatk n. Often the work can 
be simplified by the purchase of a good single gut 
leader already made up, to which the hooks can be 
looped without much loss of time. But the past 
master of the gentle craft is par excellence, his own 
tackle maker, and be takes the keenest pride in put- 
ting together, so far as possible, all the appliances 
that he usee in taking fish Such veterans of the 
game as these will purchase a dozen strands of the 
best single-gut obtainable, soaking them an hour or 
two in warm water, and will then start to work. 

The matter of gut knots is hardly onethat can be 
defined on paper so that a novice can tie them, but 
any veteran angler knows twists and turns that will 
hold, some of them being so simple that a minute's 
practice will master the secret, while others, the 
more finished "water knots" and loop fastenings, are 
altogether too intricate to begin on. The astening 
known as the "double water knot" is unquestionably 
the best for gut, as this odd material must be tied in 
certain ways and only when soaking wet, else it will 
crack and have no strength whatever. 

The best hook for pompano catching is a No. 10 
double-barbed "Catch-the-Nibbler, " but that size is 
hard to obtain, and in its absence a Carlisle, sneck or 
sproat will answer every purpose, though the double- 
barbed creations really seem to live up to their trade 
name in "catching the nibblers." The Bnells sold on 
these when made up are altogether too long, and the 
wise angler will shorten tbem up until the hook will 
only clear the leader two or three inches. This per- 
mits about three times as many hooks to be used as 
otherwise, and is therefore an advantage, since pom- 
pano are gregarious and bite in company, half a dt zen 
sometimes being raised at one haul by allowing the 
fish first hooked to play around a bit. 

Only a light sinker is required in pompano catchirg 
the depth to be fished depending entirely upon what 
water the school may happen to be running through; 
sometimes pompano are near the surface. Another 
day they may be just off the bottom, though mid- 
water is their usual habitat. 

By taking snelled hooks and tying them together, 
using the snells as a leader, an impromptu apparatus 
can be rigged up which will answer the purpose fairly 
well, but the thi ee to five-foot leader made up f r< m 
single guts is enough better to warrant all the trouble 
there is in the making of it. 

The rod of the pompano fisher should be very 
elastic, and for wharf use a cane pole such as used f»r 
mackeral is quite the thing. A reel is not necessary, 
as the long rod will lift the fish without any need of 
taking in line. Those who fish from a boat will find a 
reel a convenience, and will enjoy better sport with a 
nine or ten-foot rod of very light caliber than with 
anything shorter. The eastern black bass rods of 
Dr. Hensball's design are almost ideal for the require- 
ments of local sport at present. A stiff rod loses many 
pomparo through tearing the hooks from their little 
moutr 

The nest oi all baits for pompano fishing is lobster 
exposed to the sun for a day or two until some of the 
water is dried out of it. ' This makes it stay on the 
hook better than the fresh meat does. Pompano life 
it better than shark, ray or anything else though in 
the absence of lobster bait, steaks cut from the wings 
of shovelnose sharks, "stingarees, " and such other 
finned nuisances are a very good substitute. 

The veteran pompano oatcber is never in a hurry 
and seldom strikes his fish. Pompano bite slowly and 
nibble at the bait before taking it in, as must every 
small-mouthed fish. They can absorb a gob of lob- 
ster as big as one's fingernail if given a little time to 
do it, but baits of as small size as can be made to stay 
on the hook answer better in most cases. 

As a well-made pompano leader has three or four 
hooks to every foot of its running length there need 
never be any haste to raise a hooked fish. In the bay 
where pompano run pa6t in schools and leave toll 
each trip, it is an advantage to get as many on as 
possible for every haul; the struggles of the hooked 
ones tend to keep the others around and often induce 
them to bite also. A "raise" of half a dozen strug- 
gling quarter-pound pompano is likely to give even a 
veteran angler some "sensations" very nearly akin to 
keen pleasure. 

Fishing in the bay at present, the always to be 
reckoned with kingfish and herring are sure to present 
themselves, and some a shade larger for the tackle 
are likely to stray along, but a little time and patience 
will generally wear them out without damage to the 
gear. The silvery goggle-eyed perch familiarly 
known to fishers as "Pasadena pompano," from their 
slight resemblance to the better fish, are always will- 
ing to bite, and some of theunsopbisticatt d take tbem 
home by mistake every Sunday. They are about tbe 
most worthless thing that wears fins in the ocean; 
watery and poorly flavored, they are so full of bones 
that a cat will turn away from one in disdain. The 
origin of the nickname is shrouded in the same 
mystery that envelops the jesting of shooters who call 
spoonbill ducks "Pasadena mallards." 

One big advantage of a pompano leader is that it 
does equally good service for jack smelts which are at 
present biting in San Pedro bay along with tbe pom- 
pano. These lithe, silvery fellows put up a lively 
tussel for their inches, and are well worth angling for, 
even when the pompano are in evidence. Lobster 
bait looks good to tbem, and no change except as t.o 
depth is necessary when they are desired. The smelts 
generally run higher than the pompano. Some very 
fine silversides of fourteen and fifteen inches in length 
have been pulled out of San Pedro bay during the 
week. 

The present period is a veritable "picnic" for the 
small fishermen and large parties have enjoyed it 
every day. Sundays, standing room on tbe wharves 
is at a premium. Those who desire to have elbow 
room find it necessary to secure boats and anchor 
these out in tbe stream, though the fishing is just as 
good frcm the decks of the lumber schooners which 
lie alongside the piles. 

The peculiar, fresh-cut-grass rdor of pomparo when 
first caught has been a source of much speculation to 
shore fishermen this winter, and even the oldest of 



January 14, 1905J 



©he gveextev ants gtpjcurtemcm 



9 



them are at a loss to account for it, unless it be due to 
some kind of vegeteble food which the little fish eats, 
and to which, doubtless, it owes its delicate flnvor and 
freedom from the "fishiness" of some other varieties. 
It is this sweet taste thatcauses the pompano to hover 
around 40 cents a pound in the markets. Like the 
sanddab, it is a dish that people who do not like most 
fish relish because as they say, "Tt doesn't taste a bit 
like fish." 



MONTANA BUFFALOES SHIPPED HERE. 

TheGolden Gate Park herd of buffaloes was recently 
increased by the arrival here of a bull and two cows. 
The three animals were shipped from Montana in a 
cattle car and then carried to the park in a specially 
constructed cage built on a huge truck. 

The three Montana bisons were turned loose in a 
paddock near where the spotted deer and the kanga- 
roos reside. For a while they trotted here and there 
through the inclosure, sniffing the wind suspiciously. 
But one taste of California grass made them feel at 
home. 

The Park Commissioners, who take every precau- 
tion for the welfare of the buffaloes, found that the 
park herd was in danger of deteriorating because of 
in-breeding. New stock was needed, so the three new 
buffaloes were purchased from the Eaton ranch in 
Montana. The importations are fine, healthy speci- 
mens of the bison and all of them are two-year-olds. 

The new arrivals will be kept to themselves for a 
while. The males of the original herd would fiercely 
resent the intrusion of the bull from Montana and the 
cows in the big paddock might not receive the females 
cordially at first introduction. 

The Montana animals look little the worse for the 
rough experience they have been through. They 
were roped by dexterous cowboys on the Eaton ranch ; 
then they were loaded into a cattle car and for several 
days whirled along behind a noisy, shrieking engine. 
They seemed more than glad to feel the soft turf under 
their feet. Their present quarters are a little cramped, 
for in Moatana they had many acres to roam over. 

The sight of a truck load of buffaloes naturally 
created considerable excitement along- the streets of 
this city. The animals eyed the curious spectators in- 
differently though they had never been in close 
quarters with mankind until they started on the trip 
to California. One of the cows has a slight defect. 
A horn was torn from her head in a fight back in 
Montana. 



SE i SON ENDED. 

In British Columbia, December 31st, was the last 
day of the season for the shooting of grouse of all 
kinds, and on Jan. 1st the last shots were fired at 
quail and the pheasants. The birds have been — more 
especially the grouse— a scarcer quantity than usual 
this autumn, and all lovers of the gun up north are 
joining hands to press desired amendments to the 
game law when the legislature meets on the 9th prox , 
the most important feature of which will be the pro- 
posal to prohibit the sale of blue grouee absolutely. 
It is felt that such a step is imperative if this fine 
game bird is to be saved from extermination in the 
accessible districts. It is also probable that the House 
will be asked to fix a maximum for a day's bag, the 
only law in this direction at present on the statute 
book Weing with respect to ducks, of which birds it is 
enacted that no one shall kill or take more than 250 in 
the course of a season. This section of the act is 
absolutely and necessarily inoperative and impossible 
of enforcement. 



The Collie as a Worker. 



(Written by E. Bjorkeland for the Montreal Collie Club ) 
In my attempt to describe the pure bred Collie as a 
worker I much regret my inability as a writer, but 
perhaps with my inborn love for dogs and my hand- 
ling of live stock for twenty-five years, it follows that 
I must have had workers more or less useful. * 

Before going into the subject at hand I may remark 
that some men are able to get the best work out of 
almost any dog where others utterly fail. The whole 
secret lies in our ability to get the dog's unbounded 
confidence, then the dog's working is only limited by 
his Intelligence or his aptitude to understand what is 
wanted. 

As to what is wanted of a worker there seems to be 
some difference of opinion, and in too many cases I 
have heard a dog called a worker if bo can bring home 
the cows and drive the neighbor's sheep off the field, 
the whole education consisting in teaching the dog to 
understand the meaning of "Sic-em." This learned, 
the dog will run at the cows, bark and bite, drive the 
cows to the far end of the pasture, where they must 
turn or jump the fence; the dog follows, and as the 
cows have no other way of getting rid of their 
tormentor they naturally run for the barn, tn this 
case it is the cows that are trained to run home when 
the dog comes. 

Personally I require a dog of a different education 
and ability. He must bring home the cows, but do It 
gently without exciting them. He must also pen a 
flock of sheep at any place when required ; drive cattle 
or sheep on the road and keep them there; and 
furthermore, to be a farmer's dog, he must handle 
pigs, the most troublesome of all animals to drive; 
and all of this requires, as you can readily see, the 
very highest intelligence, besides an inborn aptitude 
for such work. 

I will pass over the various breeds or mongrels I 
have had and come to my first pure bred Collie. 
Fanny I got as a pup in the winter of 1896, from 
Robert Allan, Mt. Royal Vale, and began to work her 
at six montb.9 of age. The first time I brought her 
into the pasture with young cattle, Fanny rounded 
up and drove the cattle to me and held them there 



wheeling about and turning back anyone attempting 
to stray. This very thing I, with more or less success, 
had tried to teach dogs of various breeds — the driving 
to me. This was a natural instinct in her; training 
she had none. She learned obedience as all my dogs 
must do, and to understand hand motions which 
indicated to drive to right or left, forward or back, 
and I fear I shall never find her equal. 

As proof of her intelligence I may relate one 
instance. In the fall of '97 we had twenty-five or 
thirty half-grown pigs running in a pasture; they got 
out one day and into a cornfield unknown to me, but 
Fanny, on her own responsibility, drove the pigs out 
of the cornfield over to the pasture gate, which was 
closed. I was told by one who saw her that she ran 
up to the locked g?te. then sat down and seemed to 
turn matters over in her mind, then with a few lively 
jumps and bites ran the pigs together, then off to find 
me, then by excited barking she tried to make me 
understand that something was wrong, and when I 
followed her she went ahead and had all the pigs at 
the gate ready to turn in. I could name many other 
Collies of great merit as workers, they being descended 
from Fanny and may possibly have derived their 
working ability from her. 

We will take up my latest acquisition, Ben Davis, 
who9e sire is Woodmansterne Conrad , dam Logan's 
Apple Blossom, a pedigree that is well known to Collie 
breeders, and it is equally well known that none of 
Ben's ancestors have been workers for many genera- 
tions. I purchased this dog from Mr. Robert Mc- 
Ewan, qualities were aroused and he showed an ex- 
pression that would gladden the heart of any Collie 
man. Knowing Ben'." gentle disposition and that he 
would not chase sheep or anything else, I tried to 
make him understand the word "fetch." Ben started 
slowly at first, gradually increasing in speed, every 
vital fibre in his body and brain working in harmony, 
and rounding up those sheep drove them to the 
middle of the field, heading off and turning any strays, 
neither barking nor biting, just galloping along close 
up to the sheep and throwing his body against them 
to turn them. I realize my inability to properly 
describe this. I have often watched a Pointer or 
Setter on his first day in the field, and any gunning 
man knows the excitement when such a dog finds his 
first game, but this is nothing compared to the sight 
of a good Collie rounding up his first sheep. 

I had no right to start off with another man's 
sheep, but right or wrong I headed for the gate and 
Ben followed with the sheep slowly but surely, turn- 
ing them into a narrow lane leading to the farm. 
Now I did not want to take the sheep down to the 
farm, so after keeping them there for a short time, I 
started to turn them back The sheep, however, did 
not feel inclined to go back, and when 200 sheep stop 
in a narrow lane they form a blockade that is not 
easily broken, and here I had another agreeable sur- 
prise, showing plainly the instinct there is in the pure 
bred Collie, although it may be dormant. 

Twice Ben jumped the fence and tried tostart them, 
but could not; then without word or sign from me he 
ran along the backs of the flock to the foremost, 
barked, and with his head tried to separate them. He 
got them started, and agaiD when the sheep were 
passing the pasture gate Ben ran over the sheep, 
headed them off, and turned them into the pasture. I 
cannot say who was prouder, the dog or his master, 
but there was not enough money in Canada to buy 
Ben Davis that day. Since then I have had no trouble 
in getting Ben to work on cattle, sheep or pigs, and 
today I can trulv say that few dogs will equal him in 
working ability or general intelligence. 

How do we train the Collie? I have no rules for 
this; each dog may require different handling. One 
rule I have equally for all, and the same for Pointers 
and Setters — if they do not point naturally they are 
not worth training. So with the Collie; if he does not 
head the flock towards me he is not worth training. 
My dogs always follow me, but I only let one dog 
work at a time; they must learn obedience to word, 
whistle, or hand motion. I do not let my dogs work 
for fun, and get off when half done. When I give the 
order the work must be done, and if the dogs cannot 
do it I must, and let the dogs see that it can and must 
be done. 

My dogs have perfectconfidencein me, and generally 
this confidence becomes mutual. A Collie cannot be 
trained in a month nor a year; it takes a lifetime, as 
there is always something new to learn. Be on the 
look-out that he does not learn bad habit9, which he 
is as liable to as his master. 

I cannot let this opportunity pass without remind- 
ing you of the d uty which rests on you — "The Only 
Collie Club in Canada." It is in your power to guard 
this, our favorite breed, from taint. Do not lose the 
working quality for a mere imaginary beauty — 
English Stock-Keeper. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



PACIFIC ADVISORY BOARD. 

A meeting of the Pacific Advisory Board was held 
in this city on Monday evening and considerable busi- 
ness of an executive character transacted. 

Charges had been filed against Charles Perry 
alleging that bis Collie Island Chief had been entered 
at shows under a wrong pedigree and that incorrect 
pedigrees had been given to breeders who had secured 
stud services by Chief. Tho matter was adjusted by 
cautioning Mr. Perry to procure the proper brooding 
of his dog, if possiblo.. and to refrain from further 
publishing a pedigree of Chief that was ascertained to 
be incorrect. Mr. Perry was held guiltless of any 
intention of deception, his prior source of Information 
in that respect having been deemed trustworthy. 



A KENNEL CLUB FOR ST. LOUIS. 

A call has been issued, signed by Russell E.Gardner, 
calling attention of St. Louis dog fanciers to the 
importance of establishing a permanent kennel club in 
that city and requesting all those interested to for- 



ward their names, together with the breed of animils 
owned, to Mr. Jos. A. Graham and Mr. Harry b. 
Hawes, in care of the Missouri Athletic Club, St'. 
Louis. 

A meeting will be called later of those from whom 
responses are received, and permanent organization 
effected . 

St. Louis is the home of many fanciers and the 
abiding place of many owners of high-bred dogs. An 
organization of the character contemplated would be 
not only interesting but of much benefit. The organ- 
ization of such a kennel club would, of course 
ultimately result in an annual dog show, and under 
tho management of the gentlemen named could not be 
otherwise than highly successful. That the move- 
n ent will meet hearty response from owners and 
fanciers is without question. 



A GREAT COLLIE KENNELS. 

Glen Tana Talent, the Philadelphia winner in pup- 
pies, arrived in Spokano on the 5th inst. in good 
shape. She is certainly a fine Collie; nice, long head, 
small ears, excellent coat, and she is very large for 
her a re. She looks a great deal like Ch. Bo Peep, a 
winner at San Jose, etc. Her sire is Glen Tana 
Bounder (by Ch. Parbold Piccolo), dam Glen Tana 
Laura Lea, a winner herself and the dam also of 
Balmoral Duchess. 

Glen Tana Collie Kennels shipped two Collie pup- 
pies to Wyoming purchasers last week. 

Mr. Griffith should have a fine lot of high-bred Col- 
lies for sale this spring; in fact, we doubt if there will 
be a better lot of Collies to be found west of the Mis. 
sissippi than are now in the Spokane kennels. 

Glen Tana Marquis has recently served Glen Tana 
Roma, Glen Tana Scylla, Glen Tana Mina and Glen 
Tana Moreton Vesta (the dam of 10 winners). Ch. 
Lenzie Prince (winner of 47 firsts) has been mated to 
Rippowan Chance and Brandane Marionslea, a sweet 
bitch, winner at the December show in this city, 1903. 
Laura Lea, Glengairn Lassie and Bonnie were served 
by Rippowam's Archer. The outlook, therefore, for 
some grand young Collies is a most promising one. 

Besides the above Coast breedings Glen Tana Talent 
vas served by the Philadelphia winner, Craigmore 
Cracksman — the latter dog has also been purchased 
by Mr. Griffith. 

To fanciers interested in Collies we call attention to 
the Glen Tana announcement in the classified "ads" 
on page 15. 

NEW SPECIALTY CLUB ORGANIZED. 

The Dalmatian Club of America has been formed, 
with the following gentlemen as officers: 

President, Alfred B. Maclay; vice-president, H. T. 
Peters; secretary-treasurer, J. S. Price, Jr. Special 
prizes in cash or plate have been offered at the New 
York and Boston shows and the annual meeting will 
be held during the week of the New York show. 

All fanciers desirous of joining the club will please 
communicate with the Secretary, J. S. Price, Jr., 
Chestnut Hill, Pa. 

JUDGES FOR THE BOSTON SHOW. 

The bench show committee of the New England 
Kennel Club have not as yet been able to decide upon 
their entire list of judges, but Secretary Gero fur- 
furnisnes the following as the list up to date, with a 
complete assignment next week says Field and Fancy'. 

Mr. Joseph M. Dale, Brooklyn, Boston Terriers. 

Mr. Marsh Byere, Grand Rapids, Mich., Pointers 
and Setters. 

Mr. Tyler Morse, English Bulldogs. 

Miss Whitney, same breeds as last year with the 
exception of Great Danes, which will probably go to 
Mr. Mortimer 

Mr. Mortimer and Mr. Lacy will judge various 
breeds as last year. 



AND THE MAN SAID: 

That the Spring show in this city will probably be 
held in May. 

That the Portland Kennel Club has withdrawn 
from the W. K. L. and filed application for A. K. C. 
membership. 

That the sidetracking of the Pacific Collie and Old 
English Sheep Dog Club's application to obtain a 
transfer from the Arctic zone to tho warmer A. K. C. 
latitudes was — because the club name was too cumber- 
some and might take up too much valuable time when 
necessary to mention tho organization during "Red 
Parlor" meetings. 

That the A. K. C. Coast circuit this year will be 
the "best ever." 

That the career of the Billy Bounce of local dogdom 
aptly illustrates a vulgar truism — "One cannot make 
a silk purse out of a hog's ear."' 

A liarand dishonest ingrato will naturally refute tho 
exposure of his inherent scalawag proclivities by ,tho 
eructation of defensive scurrility, voided, like a foul 
discharge of tho cuttlefish, for the purpose of refuge 
from observation in the slimy emanations of self 
nastiness. 

That Billy Bounce never sold a Cocker Spaniel that 
was left in his charge — and when the owner called for 
her property was told that her dog had died. 



That the "situation" in this State, and up to the 
border, seems to be well in tho hands of the A. K. C. 
campaign leaders. A rift in the clouds is promising 
for general sunshine, from which the fancy will 
absorb warmth — for how long? 



That Billy Bounce is an enthusiastic "tout" for d eg 
medicines. The stcy goes that his initial discovery 
of tho virtue 8 of a certain brand was by following the 
good old maxim "that everything ia common property 
that Is not nailed down," or securely locked up. 
There was, once on a time, a large chest of dog 
remedies sequestered in a stable, the agent of the 



10 



[.January 14, 1905 



manufacturer and custodian of the property was, it is 
said in debt to the owner of the premises and did not 
have the disposition or custody of his goods and 
chattels Billy "was on" to the situation and looted 
the medicine chest-by proxy. He had a good start 
and has stayed with the game, he "got in on the 
ground floor," as it were. 

That the practices of Billy Bounce have been ex 
emplars of systematic and persistent rascality— in 
dogdom and out of it, and will be the subject of a 
series of exposures that will properly pace Mr. 
Bounce in his class— one beyond the recognition of 
the respectable element in dogdom. 

That the Westminster Kennel Club have put up in 
regular prize money the tidy sum of $10,315 to be 
distributed among many classes at the show next 
month— and this is going some for a bench show. 

NATIONAL FANCIERS' SUOW. 

The combined poultry, dog and cat annual show of 
the National Fanciers and Breeders Association will 
take place at the Coliseum in Chicago, Jan. 23-28. 

The bench show end of theexhibit will be under W. 
K L rules The judges will be announced in the dog 
and cat premium list. The premium list with full in- 
formation can be obtained from Secretary Fred L. 
Kimmey, Room 500, 325 Dearborn St., Chicago. 

COLLIE BREEDERS' ASSOCIATION. 

Final arrangements for the Collie show of the above 
named organization have been made by the show 
committee. The exhibit will take place in the Coliseum 
Annex, Chicago, Feb. 1, 2. Mr. John A. Long of St. 
Louis, possiblyoneof thebestCollie judges in America, 
will pass on all classes. This is expected be to the largest 
Collie show ever held in this country. The secretary, 
Mr L. A. Woodward, 4445 Michigan Ave., is to be 
superintendent of the show. The premium list is 
now ready for mailing and may be obtained by ad- 
dressing Mr. Woodward. 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 



The twenty-second annual field trials of the Pacific 
Coast Field Trials Club began near Bakersfield, Kern 
county, last Monday morning with the Derby. 
Weather and other conditions have been very favor- 
able for the sport. The quality of the young dogs 
has been high class almost throughout. Out of 
originally thirty-nine nom'nations, twenty-nine second 
forfeits were paid and of these eatries there were 
seventeen starters in the puppy stake. 

The Derby was finished on Wednesday, the winners 
as selected by Judge H. L. Betten were: First, Jos. 
E. Terry's orange and white bitch Ladylike (Orion- 
Terry's Lady), whelped July 25, 1903. She was bred 
by Mr. Terry and handled by W. B. Coutts. Second 
place, W. W Van Arsdale's white, black and tan 
bitch Mariposa (Detroit Joe-Counte68 Mark), whelped 
March, 1903, California Kennels breeder, C. H. Bab- 
cock handler. Third place was equally divided be- 
tween a Pointer and a Setter— S. Christensen's white, 
black and tan Setter bitch Del Key Belle (CaliforEia 
Bell Boy-Countess Mark), whelped October 21, 1903. 
California Kennels breeder, Coutts handler. Theother 
winner was A. G. Cadogan's liver and white Pointer 
bitch Chiquite (Dr. Daniels-Fan Go) whelped May 17, 
1903, Mt. View Kennels breeder, J. E. Lucas handler. 

The All-Age was started on Wednesday, the draw 
was as follows: 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Keepsake with Jos E. Terry's 
Kilgarif. 

Stockdale Kennels' Midget with W. W. Van Ars- 
dale's Jay M. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Count's Mark with Rose and 
Christensen's Belle Fontaine. 

Charles H. Shaw's Oak Knoll with W. W. Van 
Arsdale's Harry H. 

Stockdale Kennels' Cuba Jr. with W. W. Van Ars- 
dale's McCloud Boy. 

H. W. Keller's Sombra with J. W. Considine's 
Policy Girl. 

W. J. Morris' Faith with Stockdale Kennels' Glen- 
wood. 

J. H. Schumacher's Valita with W. W. Van Ars- 
dale's Avalon. 

J. A. Peebles' Uncle Jimmie Whitestone a bye. 

Fifteen starters out of twenty-four nominations. 

The following dogs were carried into the second 
series: Keepsake with Ladylike, Cuba Jr. with Harry 
H., Sombra with Jay M., Avalon with Uncle Jimmie. 
Reserve brace, Kilgarif with Mariposa 

The attendance of club members and visiting sports- 
men has been good and of a character and sty le de- 
sirable at field trials. Judge, handlers, dogs and 
birds, all had a chance for the free and unimpeded 
attention to the business that made the meeting most 
enjoyable. 

On Wednesday evening at the annual meeting of 
the club the following officers were re-elected unani- 
mously: President, W. W. Van Arsdale; First Vice- 
President Clinton E Worden;Second Vice-President, 
H. W. Keller; Secretary Treasurer, Albert Betz; 
Executive Committee, C. N. Post, W. S. Tevls, J. H. 
Schumacher, T. J. A. Tiedemann and W.W.Richards. 

The following were elected members: F. H. Jermyn, 
Scranton, Pa.; Stanley Woods, Mare Island; Elmer 
Cox, Madera; 3. Christenson, Arthur Burton, W. H. 
Hanlan, J. B. Hauer and Frank V.Bell, San Francisco; 
Fred Tegler, Bakersfield: J. 11. Williams, Porterville; 
J. M. Donnelly, Fresno; Dr. A. M. Barker, San Jose; 
L. S. Crittenden, Hanford; Frank Schumacher, Los 
Angeles; Vernon P. Rood, San Diego; L. McDaniels, 
Templeton, and J. H. Henry, Atascadero. 

A full report of the trials will appear next week. 



Bob Whites Introduced in Sacramento County 

A daily press dispatch notes that Sacramento county 
is to be thoroughly stocked with bob white (Eastern) 
quail, and the first installment of tne piping little 
game birds, "consisting of twelve dozen, are already 
in the possession of Game Warden Neale, and will be 
turned at liberty at the close of the open season on the 
Rancho del Paso, where for the next two years these 
quail will not be allowed to be shot in order that they 
may have every chance to propagate if they can be ac- 
climated. Other shipments are expected shortly, and 
will be placed in other portions of the county, where 
they will receive l'ke protection. It is expected that 
the new arrivals will breed and spread all over the 
county. A large quantity of California quail from 
the southern portion of the State, where they are said 
to be so plentiful as to be a nuisance, are also to be 
shipped into Sacramento county for distribution." 

The introduction of the bob whites is not a new ex- 
perience with sportsmen of this State who were 
actuated by the laudable desire of propagating and 
increasing the varieties of game birds. Prior experi- 
ments on this line in this State have usually, we 
regret to relate, been failures for various reasons. 
The newcomers are essentially a ground bird and 
were liberated in a country that was apparently ideal 
for the Eastern bird — cover, water, feeding ground 
and climate all that might be expected, but 'jhese 
conditions were also extrtmely favorable to several 
varieties of ground vermin; red foxes, weasels, skunks, 
minks and riccoons, and these marauding animals 
gave poor bob white a welcome that haa a tragic 
finale. In most of the Eastern habitats of these par- 
tridges, the country is far more thickly settled than 
the localities selected for the birds in this State, and 
their field enemies are not so proportionately numer- 
ous. Another phase of life for the immigrant is the 
combativeness of the native bird. The hoodlum of 
the valley is a pugnacious feathered gladiator and 
will give bob whi e a lively hustling in the feeding 
places and at the drinking rendezvous. 

We believe, some years ago, a num ber of the brown 
flecked Easterners were liberated in the vicinity of 
Woodland they prospered in that section, for climatic, 
cover and fueding environment was favorable, but the 
birds gradually disappeared. An attempt was made 
to introduce the birds in the Contra Co3ta foothills, a 
number were liberated at Verona station, through 
the efforts, if we are not mistaken, of a well known 
sportsman, Mr. John E. de Ruyter. Bob white got 
along famously for awhile and was a welcome and 
appreciated member of the feathered wildwood 
dwellers of that locality. The little fellows increased 
enough to attract the attention of market hunters 
and then it was all off with the new settler. We re- 
member calling theattention of oursportsmen readers 
to the fact that bunches of bob whites were on sale 
some five years ago, or more, in the market stalls of 
thiscity. At that time ranchers and their employees, 
foreigners they were, in that district found a shame- 
fully pettifogging profit in ground sluicing quail, of 
the native and Eastern variety, and sending them to 
market. 

The Rancho del Paso grounds are as good a terri- 
tory, possibly, as can be found on which to liberate 
bob white quail and it is to be hoped that the project, 
as contamplated, will meet with encouraging success. 

The transfer of native quail from a southern section 
to the ranch district is a very wise move in re-stock- 
ing. The statement that the birds are so numerous 
as to be a nuisance down south is to be taken with 
some degree of contra reflection, for upon investiga- 
tion this charge, made against a bird that has de- 
cidedly economic value to vinyardist and husband- 
man, will be easily disproved. 

The value of the California valley quail, so called, 
as a game bird, is of secondary consideration to the 
most remunerative board bill he pays in destroying 
insects in the vineyards and fields. 

STRIPED BASS CLUB. 

At the annual dinner and meeting of the San Fran- 
cisco Striped Bass Club held on Thursday evening the 
following officers were elected: James Lynch, presi- 
dent; James Watt, vice-president; James S. Turner, 
secretary: Charles H Kewell, treasurer. 

Applications for membership were received from: 
Frank F. Wear, A. R. Douglas, W. A. King, A. M. 
Blade, J. G. Bliss, H. B. Terry, W. A. L. Miller and 
J. M. Thomson. 

Among those present at the dinner were: C. H. 
Street, F. F. Wear, W. Currier, S. A. Wells, J. M. 
Thomson, H. B. Terry, A. M. Blade, J. J. Darrell, 
J. Bliss, J. S. Turner, W. S. Turner, C. Johnson, 
C. Maynard, F. E Daverkosen, Wm. Schad, Chas. H. 
Kewell, James Lynch, James Watt, J. Freeman and 
Nat Mead. 

Oregon Sportsmen Meet and Discuss Game Laws. 

The recent annual meeting in Portland of the Fish 
and Game Protective Association develops the fact 
that there is, apparently, a feeling in favor of extreme 
protection is rife among the shotgun fraternity and 
brethern of the angle. The following extract, taken 
from an exchange, explains the situation up north as 
gone over at the meeting for those present decided 
upon what laws they wished to be passed by the 
coming session of the Legislature. They elected 
officers and intend to hold a big barbecue at the time 
of the week 's shoot to be held by the trapshooters 
next June. There will then be present many sports- 
men from all over the state, and the occasion will be 
fitting for a sportsmen's jollification. 

The leading discussion of the evening was concern- 
ing the Chinese pheasant and duck situation, and the 



consensus of the meeting was that the salvation of 
game iu Oregon is in an entirely closed season. That 
means no market whatever, not even for ducks. 

This was objected to immediately, and at the time 
overruled, but later in the evening the minority had 
their say. No one seemed to care about selling 
Chinese pheasants, and it was readily agreed that 
these birds could only be preserved by prohibiting 
their sale. But ducko are another matter. Men like 
Colonel Dunne and Will Lipman, of Portland, who 
are known not to sell their ducks, urged that it be 
allowed. Their argument was that the maintenance 
of big feeding establishments down the Willamette 
river was the only way to briDg ducks in, and that the 
most of these establishments were maintained by sell- 
ing the ducks. They also argued chat the public 
ought to have an opportunity to buy ducks. But the 
meeting had already voted that all game, including 
ducks, should not be sold. 

The other leading piece of suggested legislation is 
the enacting of a hunter's license of $1 to all comers, 
the funds raised, expected to be $15,000 or $20,000 
yearly, to be used for the maintenance of the Game 
Wardens. 

Other resolutions were the supporting of the trout 
hatchery on the Coos river, the placing of bounties 
on wolves, cougars and wildcats which destroy the 
deer, and crows, which eat the pheasant eggs; the 
shortening of the duck ssason to February 1 to do 
away with the disastrous spring shooting, and the 
change in the bass law, making the open season from 
March 1 to November 1. It was agreed that it would 
be a crime for small mouthed bsss ever to be intro- 
duced into Oregon waters. Dr. Ney Churchman said 
he considered all bass the prizefighters af the fish 
world, and did not need protection of any kind. 

Eastern Oregon's special laws were left for that 
section of the country to deal with itself. There was 
suggested a change in the duck law, prohibiting 
shooting of birds while on the resting grounds, but as 
it was found that matter had been fuggested for per- 
sonal reasons, it was laid on the table. 

The new officers of the Fish and Game Association 
are: President, H. B. Tronson; vice-president, Thos 
Ayer, of Pendleton; secretary, A. E. Gebhardt; 
treasurer, John Cran. 



Change of Business Location. 

The growing demands of an increasing business 
have necessitated a change of quarters for the Cali- 
Fo rnia Powder Works and in consequence the com- 
pany's headquarters in this city are now located in 
commodious offices on the fourth floor of the Wells- 
Fargo Building, 49 Second street. 

A Record Year. 

The Grand American Handicap R. D. Guptil 

Ihe Consolation Handicap W. H. Heer 

The General Total Average at the G. A. H 

J. L. D Morrison 

The Grand Canadian Handicap 

Messrs. Meyhew and Hartley 

The Sunny South Handicap at Targets . . W. H. Heer 

The Sunny South Handicap at Birds T. E. Hubby 

The American Amateur Championship at Birds 

D. T.Bradley 

The5-Man Squad World's Record 

The U. M. C. Southern Squad 

These important events were won with U. M C. 
shells. The year 1904 has also proved the success of 
the new U. M. C, .33 primer and the new U. M. C. 
short range shells. 

The penetration of U. M. C. short range shells at 
25 yards is practically the same as regular loads at 40 
yards, with decidedly less recoil. Thus U. M. C. 
short range shells strike with a killing force, throw- 
ing a 40 yard penetration. These facts are registered 
by the ballistic testing apparatus of the factory and 
are confirmed by the large and increasing demand for 
the new shell. 

Sa fety Test s. 

During the last year, more or less attention has 
been given to the question of the danger attending 
the handling, shipping, and storing of ammunition; 
the agitation being caused by an investigation of the 
subject made by the officials of the Chicago fire 
department and by the discussion of Senate Bill No. 
4319, introduced in the U. S. Senate Feb. 14, 1904, by 
Senator Elkins. Shortly after the burning of the 
Iroquois Theater, the officials of the fire department 
began an investigation of the storing of chemicals, 
explosives, and combustibles of all kinds in the city. 
During the progress of this investigation, it was 
claimed that in case of fire in a building in which 
ammunition ,vas stored, the ability of the firemen to 
cope with the fire would be seriously lessened by the 
fear of injury from exploding cartridges, which would 
keep them at a distance from the burning building. 
To demonstrate the fallacy of this belief, the leading 
ammunition makers of the country made a test in 
Chicago which was witnessed by the officials of the 
fire department, fire insurance underwriters, and 
others. A large quantity of metallic cartridges and 
shotgun shells was burned in a fireof oil-soaked wood. 
The cartridges and shells exploded from time to time, 
but there was no general explosion or throwing of 
bullets or shot any distance. Throughout tne test, 
the experts conducting it remained within about 
twenty feet of the fire without being injured in any 
way. The test proved conclusively that cartridges or 
shotgun shells when subjected to fire will not explode 
simultaneously, but piece by piece, and that the 
materials of which the cartridges and shells are com- 
posed will not fly over a few feet. 

In this connection the Winchester Repeating Arms 
Company have compiled some interesting statistics, 
gathered at numerous points, and have published the 
game with profuse illustrations, in a pamphlet that 
should be read by every sportsman. The publication 
can be secured upon request by addressing the com- 
pany at New Haven, Conn., or the Coast Agency 
125-137 First St., San Francisco. 



January 14 1905J 



©to gveefrev ant* *$povt&nxan 



11 



THE FARM. 



About Polled Durhams. 



About a quarter of a century ago sev- 
eral men in different localities started to 
breed up to a definite standard a new 
breed of cattle, with the object of produc- 
ing a breed resembling in tvpe and range 
of adaptability— the time honored Short- 
horns, but to be minus their horns, 
writes Wm. A. Martin in Breeders' Ga- 
zette. These breeders thought their en- 
terprise justified by the eyer increasing 
demand on the part of cattlemen in gen- 
eral and feeders in particular for polled 
or dehorned cattle. 

A striking evidence of this demand for 
hornless cattle is the phenomenal distri- 
bution of the Angus breed, the first of 
which were imported as late as 1873. Soon 
after, during the eighties, the practice of 
dehorning was started, and in spite of 
prosecution and adverse court verdicts 
the saw and clipper continued their work. 
The people decided that horns on cattle 
were not only useless, but a direct source 
of loss, through the many dead and dis- 
abled animals. The third and most po- 
tent argument for hornless cattle is that 
they not only ship better, feed better but 
also sell from 10 to 50 cents better. 

A good sign that there was room for 
another breed is the strong demand that 
has always existed of good Polled Durham 
bulls. The chief cause for this demand 
was that a large number of Shorthorn 
breeders, tiring of the horns, tried a 
Polled Durham as a dehorning machine. 
In this capacity they have been a great 
success. A potent reasDn for the foster- 
ing and development of the Polled Dur- 
ham ia found in the fact that there are 
many people who, to quote one writer, 
"believed the Shorthorn ox to be the 
grandest Deast that walks the earth, but 
that even he would be improved if minus 
the horns." The question that naturally 
presents itself is: Whence came these 
cittle? Who were their ancestors? What 
breed of cattle laid a foundation so wide 
and deep that these newcomers could so 
quickly and securely establish them- 
selves? We find that the Polled Dur- 
hams have been developed after two 
general lines— the single and the double 
standard. 

Thesingle standard branch was started 
first. Several breedere, each ignorant of 
the work of the others, started by select- 
ing good native muley cows and breeding 
them to Shorthorn bulls. The female 
progeny, if hornless, wa9 bred to another 
Shorthorn. If a hornlets bull was se- 
cured he was crossed upon Shorthorn 
cows. This up-grading was very slow, 



ad? 




A California Irrigation Canal 



tedious and full of disappointments, yet a 
few persevered. In 1889 eight of these 
men held a meeting in Chicago, and the 
following year saw the incorporation of 
the American Polled Durham Breeders' 
Association. By 1893 members of the as- 
sociation had attained such a preponder- 
ance of Shorthorn blood in their cattle 
that it was made a requirement for regis- 
tration after 1899, that each animal have 
at least 96* per cent Shorthorn blood and 
have all the characteristic Shorthorn 
markings but no horns. Although these 
single standard cattle were a good, useful 
lot, Shorthorn men rersieted in calling 
them grades. 

The double standard branch or what 
to-day constitutes the major part of the 
show herds and breeding cattle has had 
the following history: They originated 
in the spring of 1888, when Capt. Miller, 
Elmore, 0., purchased from the McNair 
estateof Minneapolis the natural polled 
Shorthorn bull King of Kine, with more 
Polled Durhams as the result. Mr. J. H. 
Miller's famous show bull, Young Hamil- 
ton, was also a natural polled animal, be- 
ing a White Rose, bred in Southern 
Ohio. Thus the double standard Polled 
Durhams are in reality a part of the 
Shorthorn breed and are eligible to record 
in the American Shorthorn Herd Book. 

Surprising as has been the rapid growth 
and development of the Polled Durhams, 
yet if one considers the quality of those 
few foundation animals it is not hard to 
understand. The breeders had royally 
bred animals to start with. Nellie and 
Mollie G wynne had for their sire a bull < f 
such superior breeding and individua'ity 
as the 7th Duke of Hillhurst bulls, a pure 
Duchess closely relat> d to the 8th Duch- 



ess of Geneva that topped the New York 
Mills tale in 1873 at $40,600. 

Polled Durhams have always had plenty 
of scale but somewhat lacked quality and 
refinement. Realizing this, breeders in- 
troduced into their herds blood of such 
good old families as the Young Marj, 
Gwynne, Kirklevington and numerous 
others, of late year3 perhaps more from 
such families as the Missie, Broadhooks, 
Orange Blossom and the like. Several 
breeders have used Shorthorn bulls of 
the low-down, blocky, beefy type upon 
their polled cows and thus attained the 
much needed quality and refinement. 
The breed is yet only in its infancy. The 
pioneers in its development are still with 
us and surely appreciate the commend- 
ing words of Col. Ferguson at the late In- 
ternational. The future of the Polled 
Durham, however, lies not so much with 
the old guard as with the young breeders 
of the country. Upon their persever- 
ance, ability and devotion depends the 
ultimate success of the breed. 



There are those who maintain that it 
is necessary to churn every day in order 
to have a high grade of butter. Over- 
ripe cream does not make the best 
butter. 



Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the 
feet. 



TROTTERS WANTED. 



( ) 



NE HIGH-CLASS GREEN TROTTER. 
Only a first-class prospect and a fine individ- 
ual will be considered. 

Also a trotter with a record; one that can wiD 
in the fast classes this year. These horses are 
for the circuit of 1905 and must be good ones, and 
prices must be right Mares preferred. 
Address J W. ZIBBLE & SON, 

672 Eleventh Ave , San Francisco, Cal. 
Telephone: West 259. 




GOOD PASTURAGE 

EXCELLENT PASTURAGE NEAR PALO 
lj Alto. Plenty of alfalfa and hill land. Horses 
ied hay and taken up nights if desired. No 
barbed-wire fences. Best of care, rates reason- 
able. For particulars address 

"PASTURAGE," 
Care of Breeder and Sportsman, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



Alfalfa Knee High 



McMURRAY 




JOG CART 




Especially adapted for 
Jogging, Training and 
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w Price Low. 



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and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 

*S~Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



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12 



[January 14, 1905 



Best All Purpose Fowl. 



TRead by C, W.Stldger before the Denver Poultry 
1 Club]. 

Perhaps more has been written and less 
accomplished in the discussion of the 
question of which is the best all purpose 
fowl than any other subject in poultry 
literature. 

Biddy herself deserves all the good 
things that can be written or said about 
her, for ehe fills her place in this world in 
such a substantial and admirable manner 
that there are none who would not do her 
honor. With any reasonable care she 
never goes on strike; works from before 
sunrise until darkness drives her to the 
roost, rustling and restless, singing and 
cheerful, a fitting example for those that 
imagine themselves wise. But why a buff 
biddy is better than a black one or a 
white biddy excels a speckled one, is 
such an exceedingly fine point that great 
philosophers and the most discerning and 
scrutinizing intellects have exhausted 
their vast resources and vocabulary and 
accomplished — what— except confusion? 

While comparisons are said to be odious 
it is impossible to avoid it at this time. 

Let us bunch the Asiatics and include 
Orpington and to compare any of them 
with Minorcas in egg production would 
be the very height of folly and afford 
substantial grounds for lunacy proceed- 
ings. We take it for granted that in this 
there a e none so foolish as to dispute us. 
For every new variety introduced it is the 
first claim made that they are abnormal 
and terrible egg producers, unparalleled, 
unprecedented and unapproachable. Even 
the big clumsy Orpingtons laid claim to 
superior egg production, entirely, we 
might say, without reason or argument 
or facts to sustain it. It is a standing 
joke among the more experienced fanciers, 
and many are generous enough to allow 
promoters of new varieties a short de- 
lusive, visionary spell to give them a 
chance to introduce their breed to the 
public. With the possible exception of 
the Langslian, the above varieties scarce- 
ly lay any eggs at all, and stop altogether 
in warm weather. Quality of meat is a 
matter of taste, some preferring the 
greasy, oily, coarse, stringy meat 
of the Brahmas, Cochins, Orpingtons, 
etc., while others prefer the fine-textured, 
gamey moat of the Minorcas and lloudans. 
To be English, ye know, you must like 
the Minorca; to be French the Houdan, 
and in all other things we ape them, and 
why is not their judgment good in the 
quality of meat of their favorite fowls? 
As to quality of dressed meat per gross 
weight, the Minorcas greatly excel, and 
for quality of breast meat the long-bodied 
Minorcas can wipe up the earth with all 
competitors. 

All will agree that as a meat proposi- 
tion the Mediterraneans are blooming 
failures. They are just out of the pigeon 
class, and scarcely get under the wire as 
a poultry proposition. For a family of 
two a large one might suffice; three to 
five would be enough for an ordinary 
family, and a dozen would be necessary if 
the Methodist preacher should visit you. 
They will lay about as many eggs as a 
Minorca (but no more), and about one- 
half the size. As they go sailing through 
the air like Homer pigeons they are a 
beautiful sight, even if the garden does 
get the worst of it. The fence that will 
confine them securely, the genius of man 
has not invented. As eggs sell by the 
dozen yet the owners of the Mediter- 
raneans can impose on a Buffering public 
that an egg is an egg, and as this seems to 
be true, and there is no way of disproving 
it, what is there to do but to continue to 
buy them on that supposition ? 

The' American class is a happy medium 
between Asiatics, and Mediterraneans. 
As egg producers they do not compare to 
the smaller ones, and as meat producers 
they do not produce the quantity that the 
larger ones do. This is true, and stands 
to reason, assertions to the contrary not- 
withstanding. The non-setters are the 
great egg producers of the world ; the 



setters the meat producers. The quality 
of the meat is not quite so coarse and 
oily as the Asiatics but partakes largely 
of the flavor. Ab egg producers they lay 
neither the quantity nor size as the 
Minorca This is true, and assertions 
count for nothing before the fact. 

As to quality of meat, amount of breaft 
meat, egg production and the most good 
qualities as all purpose fowls, the Minorca 
and Houdan stand in a class by them- 
selves, indorsed by two great nations, 
England and France, as their prime 
favorites. These nations are the farthest 
advanced in cooking, and their judgment 
is about final in any thing they advocate. 
They reach conclusions after the most 
mature investigation. 

Concluding, we will say that for ege 
production, gentleness of disposition, 
rustling qualities, beauty, healthfulness, 
meat production and other desirable 
traits, the great Minorca is all that is de- 
sirable, and stand in a class by them- 
selves like thegreat Jeffries, and challenge 
any three competitors com ined to pro- 
duce as many good qualities to enhance 
them in public favor. We say, all hail to 
the great Black Minorca, the unrivaled 
best all purpose fowl of today. 



Close Breeding in Sheep. 

For some reason, which is difficult to 
explain unless by the popular impression 
to this effect, it i9 supposed that to breed 
together closely-related animals is not 
only injudicious from a practical point of 
view, but is destructive, and in some 
sense immoral. Both these impressions, 
when well and practically considered, are 
easily perceived to be wholly baseless. 
On the solely moral aspect it is worse than 
this, indeed inclining to actual super- 
stition. We are most safely guided in this 
respect by experience, and this goes 
wholly against the popular impression 
and in favor of the practical deduction 
from common sense, that two parents 
unaffected by any other disqualification, 
whose qualifications otherwise are satis- 
factory, may be bred together with the 
best results, transmitting to the progeny 
the good qualities of each, and thus 
improving their practical value. 

If the shepherd sees fit to test this, 
there is no reason to fear any constitu- 
tional degradation of the progeny of any 
such close breeding. In fact, our best 
breeds of sheep are all the offspring of not 
only close but very close breeding, and 
none of us so far have found any reason 
to cast slurs on the process chosen for the 
improvement of their flocks in this way. 
We have the experience of nature all in 
our favor in this respect, and it is whoily 
in this that the law laid down by one of 
the most successful of breeders and by 
science as well, and an apparently un- 
impeachable one, that the "fittest always 
survive" — that is, the strongest and best 
adapted to meet all the hardships and 
accidents of their environments succeed 
in living under the best conditions and 
best transmit their conditions to their 
successors, and so keep the race improv- 
ing and prospering. Necessarily, this is 
the rule in the existence of the wild 
animals, and we see no better example of 
its propriety. It is safe to follow nature. 
She has survived all the hardships and 
accidents of past ages, and all the time 
has been prospering; and the rule, in all 
natural conditions, has been constantly 
violating the popular idea that close 
inbreeding tends to weaken the constitu- 
tion of animals and is destructive of their 
natural vigor. 

What better proof of this can we have 
than the fact that in spite of all kinds of 
obstacles, including those arising from 
the tyranny of mankind, and their rest- 
less and tireless efforts to exterminate 
them, so many wild sheep and deer and 
Croats still defy the hunters' fatal guns? 
All these races are continued in existence 
through the unavoidable operation of 
that natural law that the strongest . and 
most vigorous, having the power to do it, 
perpetuate themselves. Close relation- 



ship goes for nothing in this. The strong 
males possess the females without any 
opposition, and thus the progeny gain all 
the strength of their able parents. 

We should then be content to adopt na- 
ture's successful methods, and aB regards 
the breeding of our domestic animals, 
choose as she does the strongest and best 
without regard to relationship. This was 
the method of the most successful 
breeders by whom our present breeds of 
sheep were perfected, and so far, for a 
century past, we have no cause for com- 
plaint in the least as to want of constitu- 
tion or any other indication of weakness 
in them. Note the thrift of the grand 
Leicesters, the masterpiece of Mr. Bake- 
well's genius in this direction ; the modern 
Shropshire, as well as the improved South- 
down, and grand Hampshire, and otners 
of our modern perfected sheep. In the 
light of all this, it seems almost as though 
the contrary were true, and that in breed- 
ing sheep we should consider closeness of 
blood an additional element of value 
rather than a detriment —Country Gentle- 
man. 



A Valuable Beet-Builder. 



Cattle prefer rusted wheat straw. This 
was discovered in Australia some years 
ago when cattle were seen to negiect the 
regular bag chaff for the paddock of rusted 
wheat. It has been found by feeding tests 
that the rust in the wheat in no way in- 
juriously alTects the animal feeding upon 
it. The opposite effect has been experi- 
enced. Cattle prefer the straw itself. 

This aroused the curiosity of science. 
L et summer tests were made with this 
straw in Canada. Some rust wheat was 
taken from the farm of Sir William Van 
Home at East Selkirk, Manitoba, and 
analyzed by Pro'essor Suutt at the gov- 
ernment experiment station The analy- 
sis showed the presence of 7.00 per cent 
of protein in the straw alone. The for- 
mer, therefore, contained three times as 
much of this most important food con- 
stituent as the latter. 

Another remarkable fact was discovered 
in the complete analyses of the rusted and 
the full-grown wheat kernel. The rusted 
grain was shrivelled and about half the 
weight of the other. With the exception 
of a slight increase in protein and some 
of the other constituents that predomi- 
nate in the bran, the composition of the 
rusted grain differed but little from the 
other. 

These facts are important to the beef 
breeder, who at all times is in search of a 
nutritious, cheap roughage. There are 
millions of pounds of this rusted wheat 
yearly in this country. In Australia the 
whole area used to be burned off as being 
worthless. — Live Stock Review. 



Feeding Swine on Alfalfa. 

We have never made a thorough test of 
how many hogs could be pastured on an 
acre of land, but we have experimented 
to determine how much corn is necessary 
with alfalfa pasture to carry hogs and 
pigs through the summer season. Our 
experience in pasturing hogs on alfalfa 
without corn was unsatisfactory and we 
found that when the hogs had plenty of 
alfalfa and from one to one and a half 
pounds of corn each daily they would 
make a gain practically of one pound per 
a day. In other words, they would gain 
in flesh nearly as much in a day as the 
corn fed. We also found that the tota 
number of pounds of gain on a drove of 
100 head of hogs that this small ration of 
corn did not cost to exceed two cents a 
pound for the gain made We found that 
three or four hogs to the acre, and then 
cut the alfalfa three times just the same 
as we would had it not been pastured, 
was much more satisfactory than to run 
ten or twelve head of hoge to the acre and 
not cut the alfalfa. We can safely run 
thirty to fifty head of hogs on ten acres 
of alfalfa, cut it three times and hardly 
know that the hogs were on the alfalfa. 
During the past summer we made a gain 



of eight-tenths of a pound daily on hogs 
weighing an average of 100 pounds each 
by feeding only ODe pound of ground 
wheat to each hog. On this pasture we 
run only about five head to the 
acre and cut the alfalfa three time§ and 
«ve could not tell the difference b tween 
this pasture carrying five hogs to the acre 
and the adjoining one not pastured at all. 
We have found that it was almost an im- 
possibility to get a hog to eat enough al- 
falfa hay during the winter to sustain 
life, but by cutting the hay fine with a 
feed cutter and mixing it with ground 
cornmeal, wetting it well, we can get 
them to eat from five to six pounds of dry 
alfalfa a day and in this way we winter 
them very satisfactorily, securing steady 
gain during the entire season. A'falfa, a 
laxative food, keeps the system in perfect 
order, and makes it safe to feed a larger 
quantity of corn than without it. The 
greatest trouble in getting the small pigs 
or shoats to eat alfalfa is that it is too 
coarse for them to digest, and we were 
not satisfied even with the cut alfalfa. 
Recently we have been grinding the al- 
falfa, mixing it with ground com and 
feeding it as slop Not only the small 
pigs and shoats, but the old brood sows 
have done much better than ever before 
on alfalfa meal and ground corn. — Farm 
Journal. 

Sells Millions ot Eggs. 

Russia is the largest seller of eggs in 
the world. She sells nearly every year 
to other countries 150,000,000 dozens of 
eggs, and her sales are now constantly on 
the increase, showing that poultry raising 
is also on the increase. 

China is supposed to be the largest 
producer of eggs in the world, but China 
keeps no egg statistics, so one can't tell 
exactly, but the Chinese are great egg 
eaters, and with the exception of a few 
million she lets the Japanese people have 
she keeps the rest for home use, and as 
there are over 400,000,000 people at home 
it takes a whole lot of eggs. The smallest 
farm home found anywhere in the empire 
is always supplied with a great flock of 
hens. 

Mutton Chops. 

Roots, when fed with grain, produce 
choice mutton. The sheep may be herded 
on the roottrop in the field, after which 
the crop can be pulled and stored before 
frost. 

The troughs for grain feeding should be 
ten or twelve inches wide so that the 
sheep must eat slowly. 

It is best in feeding not to carry the hay 
over the sheep's backs; it can be dropped 
from above to the racks, or placed in the 
racks from the ends or alleys. 

Drinking places should be provided 
which allow fresh water to be kept before 
the flock.— Exchange. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Sate, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes aU 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy tor Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., It la Invaluable. 

livery bottle of Caustic Balsam sold is 
Warranted to (rive satisfaction. Price $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by druggist*, or sent by ex- 
press, charges paid, with full directions for 
Its use. tirsend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

-The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



January 14, 1905J 



13 



Always the Dralt Gelding. 

[Breeders Gazette.] 
A great many years ago this journal 
stated it as its belief that the drafter was 
the most profitable norse the farmer could 
breed. The enunciation drew down on 
the devoted head of the founder of the 
Gazette a storm of protest, but time has 
well proved the soundness of that con- 
tention The drafter is today and has 
always been the best equine money maker 
for the farmer. It boots not to go once 
more into the history of the frenzied effort 
made by farmers to breed trotters once 
Williams had shown up Axtell and Aller- 
tcn. History shows us that there is only 
one Axtell and only one Allerton. Surely 
these many years should have taught 
the farmer that speed breeding is not l is 
game. The drafter is the horse for the 
farm. 

But since the early days of this journal 
there has entered into the draft horse 
breeding field an element which did not 
appertain thereto at first. That element 
is the desire on the part of the wealthy 
horse using firms to own the best. That 
is the element which has done more than 
anything else to boost the price of the 
show horse to the level on which it now 
rests. Six hundred and sixty dollar geld- 
ings and thousand dollar teams were not 
in evidence when the gospel of the drafter 
was first preached by the late J. H. 
Sanders. And he builded better than he 
knew, for every farm owner who then 
followed his advice and since then has 
turned not to the right nor to the left but 
has steadily stuck to the draft breed of 
his choice is now on easy street, with 
money in the bank and credit among his 
fellowmen. 

Today the opportunity of the breeder of 
drafters is greater than it ever was. For 
every show gelding he can produce there 
are ten men waiting to sign him a big 
check. When men can get $450 for three- 
year-old geldings and when it takes a firm 
almost fabulously wealthy a whole year 
in which to get together a mere matter of 
fifteen head of show horses, and when 
only a few of these are really heavy 
enough, the field certainly offers a moBt 
alluring prospect. There will be no 
turning nor twisting of the market on 
its tracks. The show horse, the good 
horse, will from this on always command 
his price. Conditions are more stable 
than they were. 

To be sure we have only a few good 
drafters in the country. If there were 
far more their value would not drop. 
Here is a trade in which over-production 
is not to be feared. But where are we to 
find them? Some time ago we suggested 
that there was the best 6ort of a chance 
for some one to establish a business for 
himself in the purveying of high class 
draft geldings to the men who desire to 
buy them. In the old countriessuch men 
are rich with money made from the fruits 
of their own endeavor. In Scotland for 
instance if a show gelding is wanted there 
is one man who may be relied on to fur 
nish him if he is to be found. It costs 
money to get such a horse and the profit 
is reaped by the yoeman who had the 
necessary grit and judgment to buy the 
winner when he was young. Never in 
all the history of the horse using trade 
was there such a glorious chance for some 
one to make a name for himself and 
opulence as well as there is right here and 
now in this very business. He would be 
the well paid go-between that must al- 
ways appear in all high-priced business. 
It will take a farm and money, but these 
are available on every hand. They are 
both cheap and plentiful. It only needs 
the man for the hour and surely the hour 
will produce him. 

A Four-Thousand-Dollar Bull. 



A carload of nine head of fine cattle 
arrived from Iowa last Saturday con- 
signed to the Humboldt Herd, Suisun, 
owned by Senator Rush and William 
Pierce. Among the number was a pure 
bred Scotch short horn bull, for which 



$4000 was paid. He is registered as Non- 
pareil King, 192,871, and weighs about 
2100 pounds. He will be placed at the 
head of the Humboldt Herd. R. M. 
Dunlap, wiio went East with Senator Rush 
several weeks ago, brought the cattle 
from Iowa.— Suisun Republican. 



Worth $100 A Bottle, 



Racing! Racing! 




New California Jockey CI 
OAKLAND TRACK 




Collinsville, Texas, Feb. 10, 1903. 
Dr. B. J. Kendall Co., FnosUire Falls, Vt. 

Gentlemen: — Having two fine and valuable horses which had 
been lame with Spavin for nine months, I sent to the druggist 
at Decatur for a bottle of 

Kendall s Spavin Cure 

which in six weeks removed all lameness and soreness, and 
both horses are sound as colts. The one bottle was worth 
% 1 00 to me. You may use my name at any time y-M wish. 

Very truly yours, P. H. SEGLER. 

Price SI; tlx for 35 . As a liniment for family use it has 
I no equal. Ask your druggist for Kendall's Spavin Cure. 
AAiouriiAiiin rtii-iinniw ■ m also " A Treatise on the Horse," the book free, or address 

COMMENCING SATURDAY, NOV, 12 dr. b. j. kendau co.. enosburg falls, vt. 



ALL FOR SALE. 

Unl A l}l\^J V1UKKS 2:18 three-year-old stal- 
rknp hi W i nn , er ' a « rand Individual, a game 
race horse, absolutely sound aud will trot sure in 

GOLD CROWN, stallion by Falrose four-vear- 
° 1 ROS L A a r K ,v g < , ; audly bred handsome and fast " 
ii i . It five-year-old broodmare bv Falrose 
Bred to Nutwood .Vilkes. rairose. 

ARDIS, two-year-old ally by Falrose Soli>n. 
did trotting prospect. airose. hplen- 

wn? RA .. S '. V lal * 17 - dotting. Sired by Sable 
Wilkes, first dam Grace by Nutwood 000; second 
v„7. ,w 0ie * 37 * b - v Jack Hayes, thoroughbred 
You will note that Nora S. Is the dan, of Marvin 
U ' u , V 1 <:, ' 0WD ' Ko-xaHn and Ardls 
nt .k. greatestsire on this Coast out 

of the same class of mares. 

P r»n,,^ v, M ^ R ^ IN w 8talli °^ lie individual, 
grandly bred and a beautiful trotter. 

J?,Hn\i n°- 1: J 6H ' large ' klDd and beautiful 
8 oSSfe^sl? ^ tep a luarter in 30 seconds. 

PENROSE 2:18k, golding, grandest gentle- 
man s road horse on this Coast; be Is perfection 
in every way and can step in 2:10 when In condi- 
tion. 

Also sulkies, oarts. and horse goods. For breed- 
ing and further particulars address 

W. MASTIN, 2228 H St., Sacramento. 



Racing Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

AQamAuflrew Si 

$2000 ADDED MONEY 

To be Run SATURDAY, January 14. 

RACES START AT 3:15 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, aj 12, 12 30, 1, 
1:30 or 2. 

Returning, trains leave the track at 4:10 and 
4:45 p. m , and immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



Good Ones For Sale. 

I HAVE NOT THE TIME NEEDED TO 
devote to my horses, I am offering the entire 
lot for sale, consisting of 

Pflttif WfllH<stPl'n 8 years, by Waldstein; 
I dlllt. VVdlUMCIH, dam PattleP.by Rich- 
mont She is heavy in foal to Nushagak and is 
nominated in the Pacific Breede.s Futurity 
Stakes No ft. J7000 guaranteed. She is a fine 
mare of excellent breeding and her foal should 
be a great prospect 

Prinrp I yearling bv Prince Ansel: dam 
L 'i Pattle P I-i entered in Breeders 
Futurity Stakes No. 4 and payments made to 
date He is a fine, large colt and a good prospect. 

TflY V By Gold Rose; dam by Berger She is 
iiiaj. a na j f s i s t er to Advocatrix and is 
heavy in foal to a good son of Stam B and is also 
nominated in Breeders Futurity Stakes 

HattlP I 5 years old; by Gold Rose: dam 
iiamt L,. by Don. Is a half sister to Hattie 
B 2:20H by Alex Button. Is also heavy in foal 
to a son of Stam B. 

One Two=Year=01d. Pl tt ™ ct P atus; dam 
One Five=Year=01d. ^ ck w G £^ 

dam by Whippleton. 

The above are all well broken, good individ- 
uals and tine drivers. 
Send all communications to 

GEO. H. LENT, 
Isleton, Sacramento River, Cal 

McKINNEY FILLY FOR SALE. 



A 



TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY SIRED BY Mc- 
Kinney; dam is a half-sister of Grace Kaiser 
(the dam of Coney 2:02, McZeus 2:13, G.aceMcK. 
2:21, Stipulator 2:1 1 and four others better than 
30 1. being sired by Kaiser, he by Geo Wilkes. 
This filly is now at the track, and with two 
months' work shows quarters in 35 seconds 
W. H. YOUNG, 
337 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

T>Y ORDER OF CONGRESSMAN J. C. NEED- 
HAM I am authorized to sell the following 
highly bred mares, colts and fillies: 
8TUH. b. m. 9yrsold, sired by Directed (son of 

Director and Twist, dam of Steve Whipple 

2:12): 1st dam by Chieftain 721; 2d dam Jenny 

Lind by Vt. Black Hawk 5, &o. 
Bar Filly, 3 yrs old. by Temescal (son of Palo 

Alto and Telie. dam of four, by Gen. Benton); 

dam Stub by Directed [seeabovej. 
Bay Filly, 2 yrs old, by Guy McKinney, dam 

Stub. 

Brown Colt, 1 yr old, by Guy McKinney, dam 
Stub. 

Bay Colt, weanling, by Charles Derby 2:20, dam 
Stub. 

DAISY WHIPPLE, br. m , 13 yrs old, sired by 
Steve Whipple 2:12: dam by McCracken's 
Golddust; 2d dam by Williamson'sBelmont. 

Chestnut CJeldlng, 2 yrs old, by Directed; dam 
Daisy Whipple 

Bay Colt, weanling, by Directed; dam Daisy 
Whipple. 

CADDIE WHIPPLE, b. m., 11 yrsold. sired by 
Steve Whipple 2:12; dam Caddie R. by Elect; 
2d dam Young Flora Htll (dam of Needham's 
Whipple (2) 2:27?£) by Chieftain 721, &c. 

Brown Filly, 2 yrs old, by Directed; dam Caddie 
Whipple. 

Brown Filly, weanling, by Directed; dam Caddie 
Whipple. 

Chestnut Filly, 3 yrs old, by Directed; dam Bes- 
sie Whipple by Steve Whipple 2: 12; 2d dam 
by McCracnen's Golddust; 3d dam by William- 
son's Belmont. 

The three two-year-olds are entered in the Ken- 
tucky Futurity, $21,000, for foals of 1902. 

The yearling colt by Guy McKinney is entered 
in the Kentuc ky Futurity, $22,000: the Hartford 
Futurity. $15 000: the Horse-Review Stake, $10,000, 
and the American Horse Breeder Stake, $10,000, 
for foals of 1903-$5 ,000 worth of stakes in all. 

The weanling colt by Charles Derby-Stub is 
entered in the American Horse Breeder Stake, 
$10,000, for foals of 1904. 

The weanling colt by Directed-Daisy Whipple 
Is entered in the Horse Review Stake, $10 000, for 
foals of 1904. 

All good size, fine individuals. Lack of time to 
devote to the horses is the reason for selling. For 
further particulars call on or address 

H B. NEEDHAM, 
R. F. D. No. 2, Modesto, Cal. 




$IOO REWARD 

for any case of colic, curb, 
splints, contracted or knotted 
cords, recent shoe boils, splints 
or callous that cannot bo per- 
manently and positively cured, 
if directions are followed, by 

TUTTLE'S 

ELIXIR. 

It relieves and cures Spavins, Ring Bone. Cockle Joints, 
Scratches, Crease Heel, Founder, Sore Backs and 
Shoulders, Bruises, Wire Cuts, Collar and Saddle Calls, 
Pneumonia, Distemper, Chafed Places, etc. Used ana 
endorsed by Adams lixprcss Co., Chicago lire Department 
and others. Tuttle's American Worm Powders DC i I ' til- 
Tuttle's Family Elixir Stops the pains and aches of mankind 
Instantly. Our IOO-pa^e book, "Veterinary Experience" free. 

Tuttle's Elixir Co.. 52 Beverly St., Boston, Mass. 

Mark tc Co., Agent*, 13-15 Fremont Bt., Sun )<-,,,.,..„ Cal. 
Beware of so-called Elixirs. Tuttle's only is genu nt* Avoid 
alt blisters; //try are only temporary relief* 

Tra ning, Boarding and Sale Stables 

Fulton St. & 24 1 h Ave., opposite the Casino. 

Boarding and Training Horses a Specialty. 

Horses for sale. Two Ideal roadsters now on 
band. Will show a iiuarter in 32 seconds, pulling 
a buggy- Stand 16 bands, weigh 1200. Ready 
for Inspection at any time. 

Telephone: Park 377. T. C. CABNKY. 



FOR SALE. 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14 1-4 

IS A HANDSOME BLOOD BAY, WITH STAR 
- 1 - in his forehead and one white foot Stands 16 
hands and 1 inch; weighs 1250 lbs. Individually 
he is a horse of grand finish and plenty of sub- 
stance. Has a tine disposition, strong shoulders, 
stout back, very strong loins and stifles, strong 
bone, with good feet and legs He Is sired by the 
great McKinney 2:1 1 % His dam, Lady Washing- 
ton 2:35. had 5 colls— Geo. W. McKinney 2: 'AM. 
El Molina 2.20 Washington McKinney (trial 
2:22'/4)— was by Whipple, No 8351: grandara Lady 
Mayberry, dam of Dubec 2:16 and others. 

Horse is now at Hemet, Cal. For particulars 
address W. P. WHITTIER, 

20 Fremont St , San Francisco, Cal. 
Or F. EL HOLLO WAY, Hemet, Cal. 



Wanted to Train 

Y FTER FEBRUARY 15TII I WILL BE LO- 
oated at the San Jose Race Track, and will 
take a few mote horses to train and, if desired, 
will campaign them next season. 
Present address: JACK CURRY, 

2605 Point Lobos Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

A HANDSOME 4-YEAR-OLD BAY FILLY; 
" pacer; stands 16.2i4 hands; sired by McKin- 
ney, dam Mission Bell by St Nicholas. Hull sis- 
ter to Mechanic. A smooth galted filly, goes 
without straps or boots, and with less than a 
month's handling has paced a half In 1:11. Is sure 
to make a fast pacer. Address or apply to JOHN 
ROWAN, 13-17 East South Street, Stockton, Cal. 



WANTED TO LEASE. 

A MCKINNEY STALLION FOR PUBLIC 
use, on shares or otherwise. Must bo a pure 
galted trotter and out of a gcod individual mare. 
This Is a rare opportunity for a horse of merit to 
make a reputation. Address M. L. L., In care of 
Breeder and Sportsman. 



STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

Dictator Wilkes son of the 8 reat Dicta- 

«m» "Hives, torand Manola bv Geo. 

Wilkes, second dam the great broodmare Lizzie 
Hrlnker by Drennon. DICTATOR WILKES is a 
dark bay horse with size, style and excellent con- 
formation He stands 15 Sand weighs 1100. Was 
never worked for speed except a little as a two- 
year-old, when he was very promising. He is the 
sire of Monroe S. 2:13^ and other very fast trot- 
ters and pacers. 

TemeSCfll son of Pal ° Alt0 2:08»£ and Telle 
,i (dam of Truman 2:12 and two 

others In the list) by Gen. Benton TEMESCAL 
is a handsome chostnut, stands 16 2, weighs 1250 
pounds has an excellent disposition and size and 
style. But one of his get has ever been worked, a 
ally out of a Dexter Prince mare, and she shows 
much speed and great promise. 
For prices and further particulars address 

W. A. SHIPPEE, 
oc22eow Nelson, Butte Co, Cal. 



Two Prince Airlie Stallions For Sale. 

MI LIS K A K 2:I6 x. 2 ^MgAjgta^tg 

Fred Kohl 2:07^. Hulda 2:08'/ s , Seymour Wilkes 
2:08'/S; 1st dam Fearless by Fallis 47H1 (rec 2:23), 
sire of John R Baldwin 2:17*4. Fallacy 2: 17*4, Fal- 
rose 2:19, and dam of Janice 2 08)4; 2d dam Jean 
Perault by Signal 3327. MILBRAE has been in 
training just one year, getting a trotting record 
of 2:l6y, (trial 2:13) with first half in 1:05, a quar- 
terin:31!<(. This is no measure of his speed. He 
is a seal brown, 16 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, « 
yearsold. 

<VIKNLO BOY 37401 h ? Prince Airlie 28045 by 
Guy Wilkes 2:I5J<: 1st 
dam Signal by Del Sur 1098, grandam Lady Signal 
by Signal 3327 With very little work he has 
trotted in 2:29^, quarters In :35 He is a brown 
with white pasterns, 16.1 hands, weighs about 
1170, and 5 years old. 

For further Information apply to 
P. H. Mc EVOY, Menlo Park Cal 

FOR SALE. 

Black Mare, 7 years old, 16 hands high, by 
McKinney 2:11k, dam by Antevolo 2:19; second 
dam Fontana (dam of Silas Skinner 2:17 and 
Flora Belle 2:23) bvAlmont33; third dam Fanny 
Williams (dam of Bay Chieftain 228) by Alexan- 
der's Abdallah. She has trotted miles in 2:24. 
Also her 

Weanling Filly by Stam B. 2:11; entered In 
the Kentucky Futurity and the Pacific Breeders 
Futurity stakes. 

Price, »750 for both. 

Apply to or address A M. SCHMIDT, Room 27, 
Macdonough Building, Oakland. Cal. 

STALLION FOR SALE. 

•siHriPV Rnv ??00l One of the handsomest 
OIUHCV UUV LLyyi. sonaot Sidney .Stands 
16 hands and weighs 110 pounds In color he Is a 
dark bay or brown, and In every respect a splen- 
did individual. On his dam's side he carries the 
blood of David Hill, a strain that is much sought 
after by Eastern horsemen. He Is a sure foal- 
get er and sires size, stylo, speed and quality. 
He has a good disposition and a lady can drive 
him with perfect safety. His colts are here to 
show for themselves. For particulars address 
J. W. STUFFLEBEEM, Tulare, Cal. 

FOR SALE. 

R0BIZ0LA 2:12 1=4 (trotting) 

By Robin 28370; earn Myrtle by Anteeo; second 
dam Luella by Nutwood ROBIZOLA is a hand- 
some bay mare, 7 years old. stands nearly 16 
hands and weighs about 1050 lbs.; absolutely 
sound; excellent roadster and high-class race 
horse and brood marc. Can bo seen at Morton's 
stable, cor. Geary and Leavenworth streets, San 
Francisco. Address 

Dr. J. W. CLARK, Santa Rosa. 



McKINNEY MARE FOR SALE. 

A „],„*„ y.'l II Gray mare by McKinney, 
iVlivt LI L. Iljj dam hv A Wi Richmond; 
9 years olJ; Sound; Good race horse In her class 
and a first class road mare; Gentle, does not 
pull and city broken. Reason for selling is that 
owner has not tlmo to devote to a horse of this 
class, Address, STEVE MADISON, 

City Water Works, Vancouver, B. C. 

STOCK FARM FOR SALE. 

iiINE STOCK FARM, HIGHLY IMPROVED, 
' In choice location in California, for sale. 
Address Bubeder and Sportsman. 



672-680 llth Ave. 
Back of The Chutes 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

ZIBBELL & SON, Proprietors 

8AN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Our Specialty: 
Boarding, Training and 
Handling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. 

A few Nice Rigs always on hand 



Take any car going 
to The Chutes 



11 



[January 14, 1905 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Inclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALY Manager. 



HAL B. 2:04 



The Only High-Class "Hal" Stallion 
on the Pacific Coast 



HAL IB. 2 01'/, was the sensation of the Grand Circuit In 1893, in which he started nine times, 
pinning all his races He was the largest money winner of that season. HAL B. la full brother to 

Atllyearsof age he Is the sireof four 



HAL B Is a hYndsome dark hiy or Drown stallion, stands I5.3V4 hands and is an ideal horse in 
every particular. Remember this is your opportunity at home to breed to a distinguished represent 
ative of the great Tennes>>ee pacing family. "The Hals." 

Season at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until April 15, 1905. 

All correspondence concerning HAL B. while on this Coast should be addressed to 
T 4>CA /"•-->- OMKK VAN KIBK, 

Terms, $50 Cash. 

Money refunded if mare proves not with foal. 
D, H. HAST. Owner, West Milton, Ohio. Reference: West Milton Bank. 



University F. O., Log Angeles, Cal 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 



Reg. No. 
31706 



(Sire of Irish x.o^M- fastest Four-Year-Old Paetr of v.n>4) 
By SIDNEY (Urandslre of LOU DILLON 1:58^) 
Dam HATTIE (also dam of MONTANA 8:16). 
WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1905 AT 



SAN LORENZO 



SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS. 



MILPITAS 



WEDNESDAYS, THURS- 
DAYS and FRIDAYS. 



Best of care taken of 

mares, but no responsibility for accidents or escapes Send f.ir card containing 
pedigree and full particulars. Address F. J. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



Fee $50 1?0R THE SEAS0N - Oood Pa stura e 9 at $! per month_. 



SECOND PAYMENT DUE FEB.1,'15 

$5 ON EACH ENTRY 

IN THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 5 



For Mares Served 1904. Foals of 1905. Stake Closed Oct. 15, 1904. 
MONEY DIVIDED: 



S?,000 Tor Three-Year-Old Trotter*. 

200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 
of Tliree-Year-Old Trot 
1,850 for Two-Year-Old Trotters 

200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two-Year-Old Trot. 
tOO to Owner of Stallion. Sire or Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



S 1 ,000 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 

20O for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Three- Year-Old Face. 
750 for Two-Year-Old Facers. 
aOO for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two Year-Old Face. 
100 to Owner or Stallion, Sire of Winner 

or Three-Year-Old Face when mare 

was bred. 



Don't Fail to Make This Payment. 

KKWEMBKIt THE SUBSTITUTION CLAUSK: " If the mare proves barren, or slips, or 
has a deal foal, or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February 1, 1906. her nominator 
may sell and transfer his nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership " 

Be Sure and Make Payment on Time. 



E. P. II HA LD, President. 



F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 
86 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



Em-Legged Horses' 

i-rc not curiosities by any miai.s. The country is full of them. The 
fourth Ipfr is there all right but it is nut worth anything because of a curb, 
splint, spavin or other like bunch. You can cure the horse of any of these 
aim mts and put another found leg under him by the use of 

Qui tin's Ointment. 



It is time tried and reliable. When a horse i«s cured 
with Quinn'u Ointment he stays cured. Mr. K. F. ilurko 
of Springfield, Mo., w rites an follows- **I have been 
UHinj? Quinn'a Ointment forsever.il years and have ef- 
fected many marvelous cures; ft will jro deeper an<P 
cmwlflM pain than anr blister I ever used. ThnuKht 
it my duty for the benefit ol horses to recommend your 
ointment, lam never without it " Tbisisthet:en**ral 
\ . i.lit t by all who trive Qulnn's Ointment a trial. For i 
curbs, BpUnts,8pavi ns. wiudpufTs, and ah bunches ft 
Is uneqmiled. Price 31 per bottle at all dniKtrlsts 
or sent by mall. Send for circular?., testimonials, &c. 
W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 



AN INVESTMENT THAT PAYS 1,000 PER CENT 

Is a bottle of the old, time-tried and stable-tested remedy Craft's Distemper 
& Cough Cure. It costs »1 a bottle and will save a $100 horse. That pavs 
doesu't It? CRAFT'S < I'KK will CURE all throat, nose and lung dis- 
eases that horseflesh Is heir to— epizootic, influenza, distemper, catarrh etc 
It will kill the germs and save the horse. At druggists, or direct, at $1 a 
bottle: S50c for small bottle. Send for "Practical Pointers," the new vet- 
erinary book, free. 




Wells Medicine Co. S!:™,^ 1 13 3d st, Lafayette," Ind! 



••••• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••.•.•«••..• 

••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a, 

.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a*... 

•••• ••••• 



••••• 

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Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting Bred 
HORSES 



•••*. 
••••> 

••••• 

•••• 

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••••• 

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§••«. 
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• •••• 
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•••• Giving 1 Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



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Thoroughbred Pedigrees 



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§•••• 

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.•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a.. 



Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



••••• 
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STALLION 



CARDS 



£1 



Posters, Folders, etc 

(WITH OR WITHOUT ILLUSTRATIONS) 

Compiled and Printed 
at Eeasonable Rates 



Every Facility for Tracing 
Pedigrees and Performances 

Neat and Artistic Work 



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•••••••••••••• 


• • • • • 


»••••••••••• 



Breeder and Snortsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 14, 19051 



15 




NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 



WARR IVIED SUPERIOR TO ANY OTHER 
MAKE COSTING »35 MOKE. 



We Make 16 Qrades, $17.75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Coast Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



Or 

to 



SHREVE & BARBER CO 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

GXD 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 

SAN FRANCISCO, • • • CALIFORNIA. 



IF WE COULD SEE YOU and take 
you into our FACTORY, WE could 
easily SHOW 




YOU WHY 

The Parker 

GUN is the BEST 

in the WORLD 



WE aim to make and do make the BEST _ 
of the OCNttAKEB'S AKT. WE are jealons of oar reputation 
and will not cheapen the quality of our GUN. no matter what 
others may do. IF you want a GUN you can conUde in as. 

Write today. 



30 CHERRY STREET, MERIDEN, CONN. 



NEW PRICE 

All Gun, No Extras. 



No. 00 Armour Steel 
L. C. SMITH GUN 




Send for Catalogue 



HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 



T M LITCHFIELD & CO —Drivers' Suits, 
« • Colors and Caps, Oilioial Badges. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 12 Post St.. San Francisco. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS— QUINTO HERH-77 pre- 
miums Cal State Fair 1902-3-1. Young stock for 
sale. Write us what you want. Est. of W. H. 
Howard, 206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



SHIRE HORSES (four Stallions, foals of 
1902) sired by British Oak, No. 5687, A. S. H. A., 
Sweepstakes Drafter at California State Fairs. 
Estate of W. H Howard, 206 Sansome Street, 
San Francisco. 

PETER 3AXE Si SON. Lick House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle. Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited 



HOLSTEINS— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd: 90% winners at Stat-! and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter contest since 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND OURHAMS. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Niles & Co.. Los Angeles 
Oal. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEW 
fix»«rl Culler 
mi hitler .. 
fint Suit, 
irom 

J25.UU up 




Only Ihc 
■fit* Help 
Employed... 
All work 
doiw on the 
premise. 



36(JearyS(.. S. f. Rooms 19-20 Phone Grant 158 



$25 SUIT $1 

DON'T SEND MONEY. Write for particulars 
and we will tell you how you can get a $25 
Ladies' or Gents' tailor-made Suit or Overcoat 
fori!. Write today. Address UNION TAILOR- 
ING CO , 230 East Ontario St , Chicago, 111. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque Calitornia. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Aider and Ootii Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annuallj by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully Illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF KENWOOD 

(Glenbelgh Jr.-9tella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersflrld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
■per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



COLLIES 



A T AGNIFICENTLY BRED PUPPIES AND 
1,1 grown stock. Five stud dogs In service. 
GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS, P. O. Box 
1907 Spokane, Wash. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



AT STUD-CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee $20. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROOS RROS. 



MEN 



25 to 27 



Outfitters 
to 

BOYS 
KEARNY ST. 

at POST 



A pleasant and healthy 
exercise attended with 
occasional soreness of 
the muscles. 

ABSORB1NE, JR. 
will quickly restore them 
to a normal 




condition. 



Absorbine, Jr. 

is a pleasant liniment to use, cures any 
strain or bruise, removes any soft bunch, 
highly perfumed, nicely put up. $1.00 
per bottle of regular dealers or by mail. 
Manufactured by 

F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 



W. 



SPRINGFIELD, 



MASS. 



For sale by Mack&Co., Langley &MichaelsCo., 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron. 
all of San Francisco. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 

STALLION SERVICE BOOKS 

(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



M. H. McMANTJS 

TRAINER AND DRIVER 

Has oponed a Public Stable at 
PLEASANTON 

and will train Trotters and Pacers at reasonable 
rates. Mr. McMANUs.has trained and driven 
three 2:10 performers and one that afterwards 
took a record of 2:0554. Corresponde-ce solicited. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 
BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Klglith Avenoe, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Pave 1324 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIQS 

FOR SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

808 California Street, San Francisco, Oal, 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
*• Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P.O., 
B. C. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin. 

[NFiitMARY and Residence— 81 1 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco. 
Telephone: South 456. 

E>i*. W m, F. EJg^n. 

M. R. C. V. S.. F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President 01 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



60 YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 



Patents 



I RADL lVIArir\S 

Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anvone sending a sketch nnrl description may 
quickly ascertain our opinion free whet her an 
invention is probably patentable. Communica- 
tions strictly conlktent ial. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. Oldest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Miinu h Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, m the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Largest cir- 
culation of any seientUlo journal. Terms, *:i a 
year: four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

IVIUNN & Co. 361Broadway New York 

Branch Office, 625 K St., Washington. D. C. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main 199 

CALIFORNIA 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Honrs. 



i 



CAPS ULES 



f 



Hnperior to .Copaiba. Cnbebn or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 
Bkebdeh and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street 
San Francisco, Cal 



16 



■January 14, 1905 




ORSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Cal. 




MISTER 
HUNTER 



A BIG BAG OF DUCKS S 

Will Cheer Your Heart. iji 

To Get Them Use 



4 



U.M.C 



TRADE MARK 

THIS IS THE 
BRAND YOU WAKT 




U. M. C. AMMUNITION 

Acknowledged by all Sportsmen to be the Very Best 
Ammunition for All Purposes, Under All Conditions. 



i 



NEVER FAILS. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 
86 88 First St.. San Francisco. 



ALWAYS RELIABLE. 

E. E. DRAKE, 

Manager. 



* 



•ir.y 



WINCHESTER 



j^nvrnMCXJisriTioivr, 

WERE AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE. 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



m 



£38 
Jfit 
1 

ft 



A New Powder 
Regular; no residue; high 
velocity and regular patterns; 

hard grain, 
Will not pit the gun barrel. 
It is 

"NEW E. C. (Improved)" 
and takes the place of 
"E.G. No, I" and "New E, C." 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 
INVINCI 



Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 

and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg„ 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



\ 



THE DuPONT COMPANY 
extends heartiest 



i Good Wishes to Its Friends 
for a most 
Joyful Holiday Season 



Glabrough, 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 

«-Send for Catalogue. 



Golcher & Go, 

FISHING 
Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 




DU PONT 

"E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 

FACTORY . . . O l_J n ■ P 

LOADED. . oH LLLw 

SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 
INFALLIBLE " 



What More do vou Want ? 



VOL. XLVI. No. 3. 
36 GEARY STREET. 



SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, JANUARY 21, 1905. 



SUBSCRIPTION 
THREE DOLLARS A TEAR 




TWO YOUNG STALLIONS FOR NEW ZEALAND 
Purchased in the United States by Mr. R. McMillan of Christchurcb, New Zealand, and Shipped 
San Francisco on the Steamship Sierra, January 12, 1905. 



2 



r January 21, 1905 



9 



EIGHT HEAD OF LARGE, SOUND YOUNG HORSES 

ALL FIVE YEARS OLD 

Thoroughly Broken, Accustomed to Steam and Electric Cars, also Automobiles. 



® 
® 



S Suitable for Single Coupe, Heavy Carriage, Express and Delivery | 



Work, According to Size and Weight. 

Bred on the Llano Seco Rancho, Chico, Butte Co., Cal., and are 

The Prize Winning, Imported German Coach Horse SOCRATES 



by 



® 

® 

© 
© 

|* These Horses are as follows: 

S 1 pair BLACK GELDINGS, 16.2 1-2 hands, weight 2900 lbs. This Pair especially suited for 

| 1 BLACK GELDING, 16.3 1-2 hands, weight 1500 lbs 

| 1 CHESTNUT GSLDING, 16.3 1-2 hands, weight 1400 lbs. 

f 1 BAY MARE, 16.1 hands, weight 1400 lbs 

© 1 BAY MARE, 16.2 hands, we : ght 1350 lbs. 

S 1 BLACK GELDING, 16.2 hands, weight 1330 lbs. 

S 1 BAY GELDING, 16.1 hand?, weight 1300 lbs. 

© 
© 



Hearse 



© 
■»*.»■ 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 



© 
© 
© 
© 
© 
© 

These horses are putting on weight every day. They are at the Baywood Stud Stables, Sac Mateo, Cal., where they may be seen (in harness if desired) ^ 
at any time and on any day. S P. trains from Third and Townsend streets leave at convenient hours for San Mateo. Electric cars from Market and Fifth j*t 



WALTER SEAIY. Manager The Baywood Stud, San Mateo, Cal © 



© streets to San Mateo every 30 minutes. The Baywood Stud Stable9 are 10 minutes walk from railway station or terminus of electric cars. 
$5$ For full particulars address 
© 

l£ There are, besides, some ten head of smaller and lighter horses by the same sire, all five years old. suitable for carriage work, single or double. Thi 

jl fine lot can also be seen at the Baywood Stud Stables (in harness if desired). 
© 

m 



© 
© 
© 



© 
© 
© 



CAMPBELL'S 



EMOLLIO 
IODOFORM 




SjyLLjgiu SECOND PAYMENT DUE FEB 



For GALL BACKS and SHOULDERS, CRUPPE 
SORES and SADDLE GALLS there is nou 
superior. 

Tbe horse CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL. 
For BARBED WIRE CUTS, CALKS, SCRATCH- 
ES, BLOOD POISONED SORES and ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. 

It is very adhesive and easily applied to a waterj 
as well as a dry sore- 
Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON 
ING. In this respect there is no Gall Cure offerea 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on Its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the (act that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the salesof 1900 were 100 per cent great- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to its 
MERITS, and from it we feel justified in saying that 
it is THE GALL CURE OF THE 30TH CENTURY. 

It is a quick and sure cure for those troublesome 
skin cracks under the fe ->ck» nich injure and often 
lay up race horses. 

All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 



PRICE:— 8 OZ. BOX, 25c; 1 LB. BOX, SI. OO. 

Read our "ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this pap»-r. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, 111. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock a^k thsai to write aayjobbarfor it 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



3 



SINGMASTER & SONS.of Keota Iowa, 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OF 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

127 St. John Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class stock always on hand. It will pay to call and inspect stock if you are in need of a 
guod stallion C. O. 8TANTON. San Jose Manager 

Advertise Your Stallion for Season of 1905. 




$5 ON EACH ENTRY 



IN THE 



Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 5 



S7,000 



For Mares Served 1904. Foals of 1905. Stake Closed Oct. 15, 1904. 
MONEY DIVIDED: 



93,000 for Three-Year-Olil Trotters. 

800 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 
of Three-Tear-Old Trot. 
1,250 for Two-Year-Old Trotters 

200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two-Year-Old Trot. 
lOO to Owner of Stallion, Sire or Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



81,000 for Three- Year-Old Pacers. 

200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
750 for Two-Year-Old facers. 
200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two Year-Old Pace. 
lOO to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace when mare 

was bred. 



Don't Fail to Make This Payment. 

REWEMBEK THE SUBSTITUTION CLAUSE: ■• If the mare proves barren, or slips, or 
has a dead foal, or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February 1, 1906, her nominator 
may sell and transfer his nomination or subuitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership " 

Be Sure and Make Payment on Time. 

E. P. HEALD, President. F. W. KELLEY, Secretary, 

36 Geary Street, 8an Francisco, Ca>l. 



0AKW00DS STOCK FARM 



PERCHERON, 
BELGIAN and 
COACH 
STALLIONS 

High class Stock always onhand Go>d terms. Moderate prices. Liberal guarantee Visitors 
always welcome Address all correspondence to guarantee visitors 

OAKWOODS STOCK FARM, FRANCIS I. HODGKIKS, Prop., STOCKTON. C XL- 



Call fornl 



MANHATTAN 



RED BALL BRAND. 

Positively Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KERTELL, Manager 



Awarded (.old Meda 
At CallfornlaState 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
'improves and keeps 
'stock in the pink of 
'condition. 

Manhattan Pood Co 

1253 Folsom St., San Francisco 
Ask your grocers or dealers for it. 



January 21 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 



BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific oast. 

— orncK— 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
telephone: Black 586. 



Termg-One Year *3. Six Months »1.75, Three Monthg SI 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
.ddressed to F. W. Kelley, 38 Geary St., Sar [Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January 21, 1905. 



-pHE PROFESSIONAL DRIVER'S ASSOCIA- 
l tion which now has a very large membership and 
can make itself a power for the improvement of haf 
ness racing conditions, has asked the American and 
National Trotting Associations to adopt the following 
propositions: 

1. That the rule requiring full payment on every 
horse named in a stake or purse shall be, amended to 
permit the naming of at least three horses on a single 
payment. . ,. . , 

2. That the number of starters in a race be limited 

to twelve. , . , , ... 

3 That all excess of entry fees over the face of the 
purse or stake shall be added to the purse or stake. 

4. That the extra per cent from winners be abol- 

5 That every race be limited to five heats, unless 
sooner finished by on? horse winning three heats, and 
the purse or stake divided accot ding to the standing 
of the horses at the end of the fifth heat. 

6 That when a driver is fined the local association, 
whose judges fine him, shall be given power to remit 
the fine without the necessity of an appeal to the 
Board of Review. 

7 That the judges of a race be compelled to hold 
some sort of hearing and get all available evidence 
both for and against a driver or owner before punish- 
ing him. 

While on their face these propositions may look 
perfectly fair and reasonable to the drivers, some of 
them have a very different aspect when looked at 
from an association's standpoint. There are hundreds 
of instances every year where the directors of associa- 
tions giving harness races go down deep into their 
pockets to make up a deficit and see that every horse- 
man is promptly paid his share of purses won. Pew 
bouquets are thrown at them, but once in a while an 
association fails to pay and it is spared no criticism by 
press, public or horse owners. There are many meet- 
ings held every year that would show a loss if the 
plan of taking an extra per cent from winners were 
abolished, or if three horses were entered on one pay- 
ment. On the Grand Circuit where entrance fees 
often pay the purses and big sums are received for 
privileges and at the gate, many of these propositions 
of the Drivers Associations might be adopted without 
any material harm to anybody, but the smaller as- 
sociations usually have a hard scrabble to make both 
ends meet and need every resource they can honestly 
get. One prominent California owner remarked last 
year when the assertion was made that on the Grand 
Circuit horsemen were trotting for their own money: 
"I don't care whose money it is that is put into a 
purse or stake; all I want to know is that the money 
is there, and will be paid to me if my horse wins. The 
Grand Circuit associations maj all be getting rich so 
far as I know, but I am sure the Grand Circuit would 
not last long if they were losing all the time. The 
man that wins gets his money and it don't make 
much difference to the one that loses whether there 
is a big or little balance to the credit of the associa- 
tion, so long as they continue to hang up purses and 
pay them." 

BIG STAKE EVENTS are offered by the St Louis 
Fair Association to close February 1, 1905, for 
its meeting to begin June 3d and close September 2d. 
Entries for the 350,000 St. Louis Handicap also closo 
on the same date See the advertisement in this issue. 



strated that the Senator's judgment in selecting him 
as one worthy to bear the farm's name was correctly 
formed. Placed in the stud at the close of his racing 
career, Palo Alto made a splendid start toward the 
foundation of a great family of trotters, but died at an 
early age leaving not more than forty foals of which 
fourteen trotters and one pacer have taken record s 
from 2:12} to 2:28A and three sons and two daughters 
are producers of speed. 

Iran Alto is ona of the very choicest-bred horses 
that Palo Alto Farm ever produced. Superintendent 
Frank W. Covey once said when speaking of him: 
"The extreme speed lines in the make up of Iran Alto 
is very remarkable. His is by Palo Alto 2:08}, a 
champion who was a fast colt trotter, and is out of 
the champion mare Elaine who held the world's 
records for three and fonr-year olds, and produced a 
world's champion yearling Norlaine 2:31 J. The 
family that Iran Alto comes from, has to its credit a 
world's record for yearlings, for two-year olds, for 
three-year olds and for four-year olds " Elaine was 
by Messenger Duroc and out of that great brood mare 
Green Mountain Maid, the dam of eight standard 
performers and also of Electioneer, the greatest sire 
of trotters. It will be noticed that Iran Alto gels two 
crosses of Green Mountain and two of Hambletonian 
10. 

Iran Alto was a great turf trotter. He was first 
raced in his three-year-old form and was second every 
heat to the fast filly La Belle 2:16 when she won the 
Occident Stake that year At Los Angeles, the same 
year, he beat the fast trotter Cressida in straight 
heats and took a record of 2:19 J in the second heat. 
His record of 2:12} was made at Stockton in 1899, 
when he had such horses as Hazel Kinney 2:09} and 
Neernut 2:12} behind him. 

Iran Alto will be in the stud at the Woodland race 
track this year and is in charge of Mr. H. S. Hogo- 
boom, who should be corresponded with in regard to 
terms, etc. Iran Alto is the property of Mr. James 
W. Rea, of San Jose, whose large and numerous 
business interests prevent his giving the attention to 
his horse interests that they require. Mr. Hogoboom 
has taken charge of Iran Alto this year, and ad he is 
a thorough horseman and has bred many record 
horses and winners, Iran Alto will doubtless get a 
better opportunity this year than he has had hereto- 
fore. Iran Alto is the sire of Dr. Frasse 2:12J, Thomas 
R. 2:15 and several others in the list, including last 
year's good two-year-old trotter Admiral Togo 2:29}. 



Iran Alto 2:14 1-4 at Woodland. 

Palo Alto Stock Farm was the birth place of many 
good race horses and the king of them all was Palo 
Alto 2:08}. The fact that he was given the name of 
the great breeding farm founded by Senator Stanford 
is proof that the Senator considered him about the 
best he had up to that time and when the son of 
Electioneer and Dame Winnie went East, he demon- 



A Card trom Mr. Frank G. O'Kane. 

San Francisco, Jan. 16, 1905. 
F. W. Kelley, Editor Breeder and Sportsman, 

Dear Sir: — In your issue of Jan. 14, '05 you pub- 
lished an extensive account in regard to the Speedway 
and Athletic Field to be built in Golden Gate Park, in 
which I was given undue credit for work accomplished. 
In justice to my fellow-workers I wish to give you a 
brief statement and place the credit where it right- 
fully belongs. 

Sometime in March, of last year, a committee con- 
sisting of W. J. Simpson, I. L. Borden and T. J. 
Crowley waited on the Park Commissionersand asked 
for a circular speedway, etc. 

On receiving the encouragement of the Commis- 
sioners, Messrs. Spreckels, Lloyd, Dingee Altman and 
Cummings, that such a project was feasible and that 
if a committee could raise $25,000, the Commissioners 
would add $25,000 and a field built that would include 
a speedway and athletic field, etc., a meeting was 
called of all persons interested, and the Amateur 
Driving and Athletic Association was formed. 

W. J. Simpson was elected President; E. J. Lynch, 
Secretary; T. J. Douglas, Assistant Secretary, 
and myself Treasurer and Jas. Coffin, E. H. Aigel- 
tinger, I. L. Borden, F. G. O'Kane and W. G. Simp- 
son were chosen as the Executive Committee. 

It is to these men together with A. B. Spreckels 
and J. A. McKerron that the credit belongs and not 
to me. Too much credit cannot be given to W. J. 
Simpson, our president, and I honestly believe that 
the work would never have been completed had it 
not been for his untiring efforts and excellent manage- 
ment of affairs. I am confident that our labors will 
be rewarded when we see the grandest athletic field 
in the world. Yours respectfully, 

Frank G. O'Kane. 



Speed Producing Strains. 

Now that the returns from the campaign of 1904 are 
all in, writes Henry Ten Eyck White in the Chicago 
Tribune, tho man who is interested in light harness 
horse,s either from the standpoint of a breeder, owner, 
or trainer, is anxious to learn what strains of blood 
were the most successful in the matter of producing 
standard speed at the trot or pace. 

In a general way it may be said that the Wilkes 



family, as for many years past, is far in the lead of all 
others, and it is a fact worth noting that of the fifty 
stallions that at the close of 1903 had ten or more per- 
formers with records at the trot or pace of 2:15 or 
better, twenty-six belong to the Wilkes branch of the 
Hambletonian family. Three of these fifty stallions 
have thirty or more 2:15 performers in their lists, they 
being McKinney with thirty-four, Gambetta Wilkes 
with thirty-two, and Alcantara with thirty-one. A 
point of marked importance to breeders is that Mc- 
Kinney is a son of Alcyone (he by George Wilkes), 
while Alcantara is a brother to Alcyone. 

It has been asserted more than once in this column 
that— his opportunities and early death considered- 
Alcyone stands out as by far the best son of George 
WilkeB as a sire of race horse speed, and that his sod, 
McKiDney, and his brother, Alcantara, should stand 
right at the top of the stallions that have ten or 
more 2:15 performers is a fact prognant with informa- 
tion and suggestion to men who are trying to breed 
harness horses that will race well in the fastest com- 
pany. Alcyone himself has eleven 2:15 performers, 
and no other stallion that lived but ten years can 
make any such showing to say nothing of h'13 having 
gotten such a champion sire as McKinney. 

Out in Washington there is a son of Alcyone called 
Alcone, and for the chances given him this horse ha 
done remarkably well. Alcantara, the brother of 
Alcyone, had a wonderfully long career in the stud, 
and when one thinks of what Alcyone accomplished 
by the time he was ten years old, and consider what 
his normal chances would have been had he lived to 
the age attained by Alcantara, the conclusion is 
irresistible that not only would he have outranked al 
other stallions as a sire of 2:15 and 2:10 speed, but that 
he would have left a band of sons of whom McKinney 
would have been but one in a dozen. 

Gambetta Wilkes, who stands second to McKinney 
in the list of 2:15 sires, gets such a large percentage 
of pacers when he sires standard speed that he is not 
ranked by breeders and horsemen anything like as 
high as McKinney, especially as a large number of tho 
Gambetta Wilkes pacers require the hobbles to make 
them pace fast and stick to the gait. Baron Wilkes, 
who stands fourth on the list, haviDg twenty-nice 2:16 
sons and daughters to his credit, would in the estima- 
tion of horsemen rank with the topnotchers, as his 
fastest ones are mostiy trotters, and as stake winners 
it is doubtful if they have their equal. It is this 
matter of quality in the get of a stallion that must 
always be taken largely into account in considering a 
horse's standing as a sire. Equal with Baron Wilkes 
in the number of his 2:15 performers is the pacing 
stallion Brown Hal, and yet no one would compare 
the families to the ad vantage of Brown Hal, although 
that horse has sired a lot of fast pacers, and a good 
many of them have been race horses of tl e first class. 

Star Pointer and Hal Pointer belong in this cate- 
gory, and in tbeir day they were whales among a 
school of minnows, so far as the average pacer of their 
time was concerned. But what Sweet Marie, for in- 
stance, did last summer was of more benefit to her 
sire, McKinney, and a greater credit to him, than 
would have been the appearance of a drzen trotters of 
the class that is usually found in horses capable of 
trotting in from 2:20 to 2:15. It is not necessary to 
mention names, but there are some stallions standing 
high in the list when the production of speed is the 
ODly standard whose get command little consideration 
from experienced horsemen. Just twelve stallions 
have sired twenty or more 2:15 trotters or pacers, as 
follows: 

McKinney, 2:11} ' 34 

Gambetta Wilkes, 2:19} 32 

Alcantara. 2:23 31 

Baron Wilkes, 2:18 29 

Brown Hal (p)2:12£ 29 

Simmons, 2:28 29 

Red WilkeB, 2:40 24 

Wilton, 2:19} 23 

Ashland Wilkes, 2:17} 22 

Bourbon Wilkes, 22 

Direct (p), 2:05J 21 

Sidney (p), 2:19} , 20 

It will bo notod that under this particular standard 
such horses as Allerton, Chimes, Robert McGregor, 
Guy Wilkes, and Sphinx are "outside tho breast- 
works," but that does not by any means prove that 
they are not superior to some of those that up to date 
have beaten them a shade in the production of 2:15 
speed, pacers being counted as well as trotters. Rob- 
ert McGregor, for instance, sired Cresceue, and that 
fact is more to his credit and means more to horse- 
men than would the production of a hundred hobbled 
pacers that by means of "the straps," much training 
and tho aid of "tin cup" records were given a place in 
the 2:15 list. There is no other place in the world 
where figures lie with so much certainty, and in such 
convincing manner, as in statistics having to do with 
the relative merits of speed sires, and yet such statis. 
tics aro invaluable to the breeder and horseman, 
though they require careful siftlDg. 



4 



[January 21, 190 5 



Recollections of a Busy Man. 

[Frank L. Herdic in Christmas Trotter and Pacer ] 

When you requested me to give you a synopsis of a 
few of my important sales while I have been on the 
turf and to also 6end my photograph, I supposed you 
were joking, until I received your personal letter, and 
as my time is limited, doing nothingd am going away 
tomorrow to East Liverpool, O., on a visit to Geo. F. 
Brunt, known on the American turf as A. B. C, his 
initials in the pool box, who by the way is one of the 
best customers I ever had), I will make it short. He 
would buy five or ten thousand dollars' worth of pools 
at a time, win or lose, and you would never know the 
difference. They are few and far between like A. B. C 

I, George Franklin Mulford Lock wood Deck wood 
Herdic, was born two and a half miles fro_n Eddy town 
(could have baen born in Eddy town if I had had a 
mind to.) Very soon moved to Addison, Steuben 
county. N. Y. 

I started life by going out on a side hill and killing 
rattlesnakes for nothing and picking berries for five 
cents a quart to get money to go to the Fourth of J uly 
celebration. I got there, but I had to wear mother's 
shoes. I was "lammed" around one way and another 
until I pot a little experience in life knocked in my 
head, and if I were not tired I would tell you about 
the first State fair I ever attended. It was at Elmira, 
N. Y. Flora Temple and George M. Patchen were to 
trot, and 1 had saved up for six months for the fair, 
stealing eggs at home, playing a fiddle at country 
dances, and so getting a roll of about $50. I had a 
pair of nankeen pants, about six inches too short for 
me, and looked as near like the young man who is 
going to college In the "College Widow" as you could 
picture it. When I saw the play I thought it was me. 

Well at any rate I went to the fair, and the fir9t 
thing I did was to get me a glass of circus lemonade. 
Four pounds of brown sugar, a barrel of rain water, a 
little tartaric acid and a circus bill made a sucker turn 
around and buy another. I bought me a cord of 
ginger bread and away I went across the lawn. A 
three card monte man was fingering his pasteboards 
on a barrel head, and I stopped and saw two or three 
pluggers win five and ten dollars. The corner of the 
card was turned up and I wondered if he would bet 
me. I did not have long to wait, as he threw them 
over and said he would wager $5, $10, $20 or $50 that 
no one could pick the deuce. Oh, what a picnic, I 
thought. I put my finger on the card and went aftor 
the safety pin that confined my roll in my pants watch 
pocket, while I wondered who would hold it. Well, I 
had no trouble to find some one to hold it. The man 
said I was taking ad vantage of bim and wanted to 
throw them around again, but I would not stand for 
for that, so he said, "Well, if I turned over the deuce 
the money was mine, " so I turned it over, and Holy 
K. Smoke! it was the queen of diamonds. Imagine 
Reuben! If the earth had opened up and swallowed 
me I would have been satisfied. Six months' earnings 
all gone, and my ginger bread got mislaid and that 
was gone. 

Well, I went and saw one boat of the race. George 
M. Patchen threw a shoe and Flora Temple won the 
heat. They unhitched in front of the stand and 
every one got as near as he could to the •mare. I did 
the same, and I thought to myself that I would have 
something to tell about when I get home. 1 would 
put my hand on Flora Temple. I turned about two- 
thirds around and put my hand on her rump, and she 
kicked me, well, you can guess where. I picked my- 
self up and made a beeline for the depot, and when I 
got home I showed the boys what I got at the fair. 

My father was a harnessmaker and played the 
fiddle with three fingers. I, as a "kid," suddenly took 
that up and afterward made a living playing at the 
country dances. I drifted along until I was old 
enough to do odd jobs, such as working on the road, 
picking stone for a red-headed uncle for 31 cents a 
day, and after I was twelve years of age I never knew 
what it was to receive a cent from anyone but what I 
paid one hundred cents on a dollar. I finally left 
home between seventeen and eighteen years of age. 
Went away for the purpose of gettinga game chicken, 
and in the meantime got married, when I waseightoen 
years old, and supported a family ever since. 

I was always very fond of horses. I went to war, 
nut as a soldier, but as a sutler's clerk. I made a 
little money, came back home to Addison, paid for a 
house and lot, went to work in a sash and door 
factory. In the meantime my Uncle Peter, of 
Williamsport, Pa., where 1 now reside and have ever 
since, got hold of me, thinking that with my gift of 
gab, he could utilize me in some kind of business in 
Williamsport. He started me out running a street 
car. I succeeded very well. As fast as I would take 
up tne money during the State Fair, I loaned it to a 
sporting man from Elmira, and he succeeded in losing 
it, and one evening I failed to turn it in, and my 
uncle asked me what I did with it. My name begins 



with George, and I could not tell a lie, and 
I told him I loaned it to a friend of mine and he 
had lost it playing poker, but would return it to me 
the next day, as he expected to get it from Elmira, 
all of which he did. 

From that I drifted into the lumber business, and 
got out of it all in one night. Burned up and no in_ 
surance. About that time the races began at BuffalO ) 
and I never missed a meeting from that day to this, 
with exception of three of last year's, when Isold 
pools at Poughkeepsie. I have sold $150,000,000 
worth of pools. Was independently poor when I 
started, and have just about held my own. 

I have supported a family in very good shape, and 
have two grown up children, my son in the insurance 
business and my daughter married to S. T. McOor- 
mick of the latf firm of H. C. & S. T. McCormick. 

About the races? I could give a great account of a 
number of the races. Have seen most all of any 
account, but my time being limited, and b-Lnging 
people in who would not want their names mentioned, 
I am forced to leave them out. 

We have lo9t one of our best patrons of the 
American turf, Mr. E. E. Smathers, who sold his en- 
tire stable, which took him five years to get together. 
He was one of the best patrons in my business, and 
would bet more money on an even thing than any 
other man I ever knew. 

He was not my best customer, however, as Mr. Nick 
Hubinger, of New Haven, Conn., was and is the best 
every day customer I ever had, and when he and his 
brother Joe were on one side and Mr. Smathers on 
the other, it was nothing to get $5,000 for first choice, 
and they would usually go as far as they liked. I 
have known Mr. Hubinger to have $38 000 worth of 
pools in one race, start off $10,000 loser, and quit the 
race before it was over about $7,000 to the good. 
That was the great race between Boralma, owned by 
Mr. Thomas Lawson; Lord Derby, owned by E. E. 
Smathers, and The Monk, owned by Fred Gerken, 
New York, one of the greatest races I ever sold on, 
Lord Derby finally wincing it. 

Afterwards the greatest selling race I ever had was 
was in Lexington, Ky. the Transylvania, which 
Boralma won. The evening before the race came off 
I sold $85,500 in two and one-half hours. They had a 
collision the next day in the first heat. Boralma and 
Bay Star got together and York Boy won the heat in 
2:11 J. Ihere was quite a little commotion about a 
foul being committed, but the driver of Bay Star told 
the judges it was an unavoidable accident, and the 
race was finally won by Boralma. 

T have been in the business thirty-one years. Have 
seen all tho fast horses, their race6 and trials, from 
Maine to California. Have never asked a driver to 
pull a heat or race for me in my life, and I am not 
honester than the times admit. Would take advan- 
tage of a good thing if I saw it. Have played a great 
many hundreds of thousands of dollars against 
people's horses and been in with it, and would like to 
have the opportunity to do the same thing now, and 
have had several of these driven out on me, and 
have to quietly bite my tongue and pay up all, where 
if they had done as they agreed I would have had 
half of it, and they the other half. I have had several 
of these little things, one that cost me $15,800 at one 
pop, and another that ccst me $10 000, but I have 
never yet squealed or opened my mouth, or went to 
the stand and asked to have a driver removed, but 
quietly kept mv mouth shut and sawed wood. 

This presidential year has been an off year, not be- 
ing nearly as good as last year and the year before, 
which were the two banner years. One thing is, their 
tampering with the old fashioned way and trying in- 
novations, such as dashes. I know they can never 
make trotting and pacing a success by giving dashes, 
trying to make running races out of trotters and 
pacers. 

The only thing they could have added would be to 
make the trotters and pacers jump hurdles and have 
a steeplechase. That would complete it. At New 
York alone this year, where we should have sold at 
least $700,000, we worked our heads off aud did not 
sell more than $250,000 at the two meetings. 

At Empire and Brighton Beach, if they had been 
three in five, and the fast classes t*o in three, we 
surely would have the amount before mentioned. 
And if there ever opened a chance for cheaters, the 
dash system does it. They can skin the bookmakers 
and you cannot get the public to take hold at all; they 
think they see something. They are educated, plumb 
up-to-date. The perquisites in my business a few 
years ago were much better to me, financially, than 
they are now. People who strike a race track nowa- 
days will find some one, usually called "touts," to 
educate them so that they can get a piece of their 
money, provided it wins, and I don't know of a single 
ticket we have had in eight years left over. The 
"touts" usually know more than the trainers and 
owners themselves, and they are there, Johnny on at 



the rat hole, to take advantage of the best betting 
there Is. They hardly give an owner a chance, and I 
do not object to those peopl^, as they bring a lot of 
money to the surface that otherwise we could not get 
a chance at. 

The associations have got things figured down so 
fine that a man might as well saw wood like old Kize. 
He sawed wood for fifty cents a cord for oyer twenty 
years. I met him one day and asked him how be was 
getting along. He says, "Well, I will tell you, Frank, 
if I had saved my money and not got married, I would 
have had $300 today. " And that is about the same 
proposition that the pool seller has when he gets 
through and has his expenses paid. I have got two 
barrels of pickled fingers all headed up, looking for a 
customer. In other words, those are fingers that 
have never made good, have left their pants in their 
other pocketbook. In other words, over-played 
themselves, aud I up to date have had to make good 
to every bu3 er who wins a ticket, also the association. 

I have been dead twice, and at that have sold more 
pools than anyone living or dead, and if I am no worse 
next year, I expect to go from one end of the Grand 
Circuit to the other end, asking what they will give 
for the first choics or a field 



Northern News. 



Victoria, B. C, Jan. 14, 1905. 
Breeder & Sportsman: The Directors of the 
British Columbia Agricultural Association are con- 
sidering the ad visability of giving two race meetings 
in Victoria; the spring meeting is to be held on the 
24th, 25th and 26th of May; the fall meeting to be in 
October, the exact dates not yet named. The fair 
and race meeting of last fall in Victoria was the ban- 
ner fair and race meeting of British Columbia. The 
attendance was good every day ; the racing was of a 
high-class; every heat was a genuine contest and 
every race was run on its merits. The Directors 
worked incessantly to give the public a first-class 
fair, and the liberal words of praise given by the 
press and public and the liberal attendance each day 
showed conclusively that the good work done by the 
Directors was not only highly appreciated but was a 
monetary success. 

The Directors contemplate quiteextensive improve- 
ments to the track, grand stand and grounds. The 
grand stand was by far too small last fall to accomo- 
date the crowds and an addition to it will be made, 
also a new judges' stand erected. Other improve- 
ments will also be made and additional stables built as 
the present number of stalls was inadequate last fall. 
Many valuable horses were kept in tents. The num- 
ber of horses here last fall was far in excess of any 
previous year; the general attendance was also in ex- 
cess of previous years, and the gross receipts and net 
profit were a pleasant surprise to the Directors. 

The Board of Directors of the British Columbia 
Agricultural Association are business men; men of 
good social standing and men who have the best in- 
terest of the country at heart. It has never been my 
pleasure to meet a more gentlemanly lot of officials on 
a race track. It is to be hoped that the Association 
will receive government aid and an appropriation for 
annual colt races to encourage the breeding and de- 
velopment of high class horses in British Columbia. 

I have just received a letter from Mr. C. X. Larrabee, 
proprietor of Brook Nooke Stock Ranch in Montana, 
in which he states that it is his intention to bring a 
few carloads of young harness horses to the Coast in 
the spring, for sale. Mr. Larrabee has been shipping 
his horses to Boston every year and has always re- 
ceived satisfactory prices. Being a Western man he 
is desirous of feeing the products of his great ranch 
distributed in the West, and it is to be hoped that 
Western horsemen will avail themselves of this op- 
portunity to obtain some of the high bred youngsters 
from the Brook Nooke Ranch These youngsters 
are from such high class horses as Alcone 6780 by the 
great sire Alcyone, sire of the King of sires McKinney; 
Alfonso 9700, a speed producing son of the great 
Baron Wilkes and Alma Mater, one of the wor d's 
greatest broodmares. Jubilee de Jarnette 5105, the 
last named stallion, is one of the greatest show horses 
in the world ; his dam Lady de Jarnette was one of the 
very highest class show mares ever exhibited in the 
United States. Keeler 6435, the sire of Onoqua 2:08$ 
and other grand circuit stars is one of the best sires 
in America. Vice Regent 20965, a beautiful chestnut 
son of Mambrino King and Estebella by Alcantara, 
the King Red 37353 by Red Wilkef, first dam Roan 
Fanny by Mambrino King; Roan Fanny is the dam of 
Fanny Swoop 2:19}, dam of King Red 2:20}, dam of 
Mattie K. 2:23}, dam of Burlesque 2:25}, dam of Mattie 
Swoop 2:30, dam of Kitty McQuirk, dam of George 
Drummond 2:17$. This concludes the list of stallions 
at the Brook Nooke Ranch. The broodmarei are of 
the very highest class selected with great care by Mr. 
Larrabee, who by the way is a most exacting judge of 
horseflesh. Every horse leaving the ranch must be 
perfectly broken, single and double, and in good con- 
dition. It i9 up to some of the enterprising San 
Francisco horse sales people to secure a consignment 
of these blue-blooded youngsters from the Brook 
Nooke Ranch since the Eastern buyers have picked 
up the cream of the California harness horses. 

A lot of new infusions from the Brook Nooke Ranch 
should be good for the breeding interest of the Pacific 
Coast. The Brook Nooke broodmares are by such 
sires as George Wilkes, Altamont, Robert McGregor, 
Electioneer, Kisbar, Alcone, Copper King. Fieldmont, 
Almont33, Jerome Eddy, Victor Bismark, Blackwood, 
Keeler, Red Wilkes and other sires of the very highest 
breeding. Yours very truly, 

C. A. Harrison. 



January 21, 1905] 



5 



Good Stock for New Zealand. 



Y. Adonis is Dead. 



On the steamer which left this city for Australasia 
Thursday of last week there were five trotting-bred 
horses consigned to Mr. R. McMillan of 162 Cashal 
street, Christchurcb, New Zealand. Two registered 
stallions, one that is not registered but eligible, and 
two well-breu mares made up the consignment. Mr. 
McMillan, who spent nearly the entire summer in the 
United States, took passage on the same steamer and 
we hope he will land his purchases in their new home 
in good shape as they will be of great value in improv- 
ing the blood of the New Zealand trotting horses of 
the future. 

The registered stallions were: Mauritius 36257, and 
Harold Dillon 39610. The first named is a foal of 
1902 and will be three years old on the 21st of April 
next. He is a bay colt, 15.2 in height, and weighs 
900 pounds. He was bred by the late J. Malcolm 
Forbes and is by the great trotting stallion Bingen 
2:06}, dam the great brood mare Roxana by King 
Wilkes, second dam Wavelet, dam of four in the list, 
by Belmont 64, third dam the famous mare Water- 
witch, dam of six standard performers, by Pilot Jr. 
12. Mauritius is a pacer, wears no boots, is a hand- 
some colt, and an excellent speed prospect. On his 
breeding he should be a great sire as his ancestors 
are all producers of standard speed for three genera- 
tions back. Mr. McMillan bought Mauritius at the 
Old Glory Sale in New York last December. 

The other registered stallion is Harold Dillon 39610, 
a foal of 1903 that Mr. McMillan purchased at the 
Santa Rosa Stock Farm after returning from his 
Eastern trip. Harold Dillon is a chesnut with a strip 
in his face and looks very much like his noted 
sire Sidney Dillon, sire of the world's champion 
trotter. Harold Dillon's dam is Guycara 2:18| by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15}; second dam the great brood- 
mare Biscari, dam of four in the list, by Director 
2:17; third dam Bicara, dam of six in the list, 
including the great sire Pancoast by Harold, sire 
of Maud S. 2:08J, etc. Harold Dillon is undoubt- 
edly one of the most fashionably bred young stal- 
lions that ever left our shores, and although not 
a large colt is well formed and a good gaited 
youngster. 

Wallace L., although not registered, is a well 
bred stallion, six years old, that has shown con- 
siderable speed and is a good individual. He is 
16 hands high and weighs 1100 pounds. He was 
bred by the late B C. Holly and is by Don L. 
2:28| out of the registered mare Economy 2:30 
by Echo. Wallace L. will be registered, the 
papers having already been drawn up. 

The two mares Mr. McMillan is taking to New 
Zealand are Miss Youngley, registered in Volume 
15, A. T. R., and Muriel Madison, a large and speedy 
daughter of James Madison 2:171. Miss Youngley is 
a bay mare 15.2, weighing 1000 pounds. She was bred 
by H. L. Asher of Lexington, Kentucky and is by 
Young Jim 2009, dam Princetta by Princeps. Miss 
Youngley is eleven years old and a regular breeder. 
Her foals have not been raced as yet but those that 
are broken show speed. 

Muriel Madison is six years old. She is a large mare, 
standing 16.2 and weighs over 1200. She was bred by 
R. E. DeB. Lopez & Son, Merriwa Stock Farm, Pleas- 
anton, Cal., and ia by James Madison 2:17f , sire of 
Tuna 2:08}, etc., dam by Memo 15907, a well bred son 
of Sidney, second dam by Speculation and third dam 
by Williamson's Belmont. 

Mr. McMillan, who had purchased the horses here 
mentioned, is an old Californian, but has been a resi- 
dent of New Zealand for the past nine years. During 
his stay in California he made many warm friends, all 
of whom will wish him the best of luck with his pur- 
chases. While at the Old Glory Sale last month he 
purchased two horses that died while on the trip 

ross the continent, one of which was the royally 
ured pacing mare Lottie Pointer by Star Pointer 1:59}, 
dam Lottie Loraine2:05J by Gambetta Wilkes, second 
dam the great broodmare Lady Yeiser, dam of eleven 
in the list, by Garrard Chief 2253. The loss of this 
mare was keenly felt by Mr. McMillan as she was un- 
doubtedly the best bred pacer that has ever been pur- 
chased for exportation to the antipodes. She has 
shown two-minute speed in her work and was but 
three years old. 

Half-tone engravings of the two registered stallions, 
exported by Mr. McMillan, appear on our front page 
this week. 

P. H. McEvoy of Menlo Park is offering two band- 
some Princa Airlie stallions for sale— Milbrae (trot- 
ting record 2:16 J ) and Menlo Boy 3741. For particu- 
lars see advertisement. *tf 



Mr. L. E. Clawson of this city, who has an eye for a 
good horse and who is about as expert a judge of 
equine proportions as the next man, was at Livermore 
two years ago during the spring horse show held in 
that town, and while there saw a German coach stal- 
lion in the procession that he greatly admired. On 
inquiry Mr. Clawson ascertained that the horse was 
named Y. Adonis, was an importation from Germany 
and a frequent prize winner in the old country as well 
as in America. Y.Adonis was owned and exhibited 
by Mr. French of San Joaquin county and Mr. Claw- 
son decided to send a mare to be bred to the stallion. 
He selected a large, black mare that was an almost 
perfect type of the carriage horse, weighing 1300 
pounds, having a beautiful head, small ear and large 
eye, with an arching neck and high action. She was 
sent to Mr. French's ranch and bred to Y. Adonis, 
and last summer foaled a beautiful black colt that is 
now eight months old. The mare was bred back and 
was again in foal, but on being shipped back to this 
city with her weanling a few days ago, met with an 
accident on the boat and was so badly injured that 
she died. Mr. Clawson's loss is a heavy one, but he 
has confidence that the colt, which was not injured in 
the least, will develop into a high-class stallion. Mr. 
Clawson received word just a few days ago from Mr. 
French that Y.Adonis died during the latter part of 
last month from inflammation of the bowels. The 
death of this stallion is a loss to the breeding interests 
of the State, as he was one of the most perfect speci- 
mens of the German coach horse ever brought to 
America. 




The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms, private baths, telephone, 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 

Strike! — if they don't give you Jackson's Napa Soda 
when you ask for it. 



Y. ADONIS 

Harness Racing Statistics. 

Secretary Knight has been delving into statistics 
that will be found interesting as showing the marvel- 
ous extent of racing in the West. He says the Ameri- 
can Trotting Association had 612 members in 1904, 
located in thirty-seven states and territories, Canada 
and British America. These jnembers held 609 meet- 
ings during the year, with an aggregate of 1989 days 
of trotting and pacing races. At these meetings 
$1,503,140 was offered in stakes and purses for trot- 
ting and pacing horses. During the year $17,335.77 
was collected and paid to members for unpaid en- 
trance and other claims, and thousands of dollars in 
claims and suspension settled directly between mem- 
bers and horsemen through the efforts of the secre 
tary's office. Money recovered and distributed, $0,- 
646.92; 1565 persons and 1762 horses were suspended 
for non-payment of entrance money due membors, and 
1381 persons and 1562 horses reinstated on the books 
of the association. It should be borne in mind that 
rhe Americin Association represents only about half 
the tracks of the entire country, and if the National 
Association is included, with its big purses in the 
Grand Circuit, it would be safe to say that noarly 
$5,000,000 is hung up annually for harness horses.— 
Ky. Stock Farm. 

Bruce Lowe Again Vindicated. 

[Tho Special Commissioner In London SportsmaDj 

Though Bruce Lowe based his figure guide solely 
on the results for the Derby, Oaks and St. Leger 
since those races were established up to the pres- 
ent date, I have for some years past tested the "guide" 
more fully by taking all the results of each season and 
noting how the families come out under that scrutiny. 
This time an addition has been made in my statis- 
tics, for besides the number of races won and their 
value In stakes, there will now be found againstoach 
family the actual number of its winners during 1904. 
It is to be observed that No. (2) family is more num- 
erously represented in the Stud Book than any other, 
and its successes must be considered in that light, but, 
on the other hand, such evidence of the line having 



proved so prolific is proof of its vigor and vitality. 

No. (2) family has regained the position held in 
1901 and 1902, just finishing in front of No. (4), which 
came out first last year, with No. (2) a very close 
second. I find during the last five seasons No. (2) 
family has carried off 989 races; No. (4), 764 races; No. 

(1) , 693 races; and No. 3, 651 races. The aggregate 
amount of stakes won by horses of the first four 
families since 1899 is: No. (2), £265,566; No (4), £254,- 
170; No. (1), £218,416, and No. 3 £173,977. 

It is obviously a close thing all through between No. 

(2) and No. (4), but No. (1) well holds its own for clae. 
sic quality, and it has never been so numerous as its 
close rivals. Here are the results: 

FAMILY FIGURES FOR SEASON 1904. 

In this table the place money in the following races 

is included: Two Thousand and One Thousand 

Guineas, the Derby, the Oaks, Princess of Wales' and 

Jockey Club Stakes (Newmarket;, Eclipse Stakes 

(Sandown Park), and the St. Leger Stakes; also all 

races in Ireland of the value of £80 and upwards: 

No of Races Value 
winners. won. £ s. 

1— Family No. (2) 120 193 (4 dead heats) ... 51,771 10 

2— Family No. (4) 85 146 5() MS5 CO 

3— Family No. (1) 96 163 48 832 16 

4— Family No. 14 32 55 (2 dead heats) ... .4i;»l6 00 

5— Family No. (9) 55 94 34,453 00 

6— Family No. 8 57 102 31,836 10 

7— Family No. 16 50 90 30,072 10 

8— Family No. 3 73 128 (3 dead heats) ... .25,186 10 

9— Family No. 12 55 95 25,026 19 

0— Family No. (5) 65 104 22,706 10 

1— Family No. 7 45 71 18,510 18 

2— Family No. 11 32 60 (1 dead heat) 16,847 19 

3— Family No. 13 34 65 14,038 15 

4— Family No. 19 42 61 12,520 05 

5— Family No. 10 34 60 11,581 00 

6— Famlly No. 20 18 38 (2 dead heats) .... 1 1,41 1 00 

7— Family No. 23 29 55 (1 dead heat) ....11,250 05 

8— Family No. 22 28 43 11,214 00 

9— Family No. 6 22 43 (1 dead heat) .... 9,475 10 

20-Family No. 18 5 13 5,537 0J 

In all instances of dead heats only half the net amount of the 
stake is credited. 

It must, of course, be accepted that No. family is 
unfortunately somewhat played out, and but very 
sparsely represented in England, but, as already men- 
tioned, No. (2) family has recovered the first positiou 
from No. (4), and not only so in the matter of the 
amount of stakes but if we turn to the races won this 
family has a clear lead of 30 over its nearest attend- 
ant, No. (1), and 24 in point of actual winners. First, 
second and third places are held by families (2), (4) 
and (1), but the latter is a good second if we take the 
actual races captured. Fourth position is held by 
No. 14, but in this instance Pretty Polly and St. 
Amant, who together accounted for all the classic 
races, contribute no less than over £30,000 No. 3 
still shows a slight tendency to decline, finishing 
eighth, as compared with seventh in the two previous 
seasons. No. 6 family, which last year dropped out of 
the first twenty, now comes in nineteenth with a total 
of £9475, an increase of over £5000. It is further to 
be noted that in the above table of the first twenty 
there are only two families which are of a lower figure 
than 20, and they are No.'s 22 and 23, Nos. 15 and 17 
having fallen away and made room for them. A 
curious point I note is that no mare of No. (2) family 
produced a winner of so much as £3500, Theale, the 
dam of Throwaway, being the highest winner with 
£63 short of that figure. To No. (1) family belongs 
the mare that has produced the winners of most races 
in 1904, viz.: Gas, dam of Cicero, Valve and Gascony ) 
who took eleven races. Pot II, dam of Uelaunay (ten 
races), is a good second. I might add, further, that 
the families which have won as many as 100 or more 
races are No.'s (1), (2), 3, (4), (5) and 8, and if we 
place the families in accordance with the number of 
wins as given in tho above table we will find they 
come out as follows: 

No. of 
Races won 

1. Family No. (2) 193 

2. Family No. (1) 163 

3. Family No. (4) 146 

4. Family No 3 128 

5. Family No (5) 104 

6. Family No. 8 102 

If I carry these a step further and add their last 

year's totals it will only change the position of (5) and 

8 to tho extent of two races i 

No. of 
Races won. 

1. Family No. (2) 413 

2. Family No. (I) 312 

3. Family No. (4) 306 

4 Family No. 3 263 

5. Family No. 8 109 

6 Family No. (5) 207 

This must surely be convincing as to the pre-eminent 
morit of the five running families. Of the outside 
families No. shows the best signs of improvement, 
and I would here reiterate the warning which I have 
from time to time given that the position hold by the 
running figures by no means indicates that it is good 
business to breed from those famil'es exclusively — 
quite the reverse. The outside figures are and will 
always be necessary for producing a satisfactory 
blond, and it should further be kept in mind that Nos. 
1 1 and 13 are almost oertainly of tho same immediate 
origin. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold in every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



6 



[January 21, 1905 



Notes and News. 



Plenty of raid this week. 



Grass is six inches high in the pastures. 



The outlook for a prosperous year in California was 

never brighter. 

A circuit of harness meetings should therefore be 
arranged without delay. 



Twenty odd maresof high quality have already been 
booked to the great John A. McKerron, 2:04}. 



The Chicago horse market received 105,949 horses 
during the year 1904 against 100,003 the previous year. 



A pair of fine youag stallions is offered for sale by a 
Sacramentan. Also a good Jack. See ad vertisement 
in this issue. 

The Kenney Manufacturing Company has a second 
hand MoyerCart for sale that is as good as new. 
Look at it at 531 Valencia street. 



A Sacramento advertiser wants a good roadster- 
and says an outclassed horse that can win at the mat- 
inees will do See advertisement. 



S. H. Hoy is getting quite a string together on his 
farm track at Winters. There are several fast young- 
sters in the bunch by his good stallion Bayswater 

Wilkes. 

President Roosevelt, it is said, is now using a fast 
pacer as a saddle horse. Spalspten 2 : 1 2 J by Hummer 
is the horse the President is now riding when the 
weather is good. 

Old Harry Wilkes 2:13} that made his record at 
Sacramento, April 2, 1887, is owned in the East and 
although twenty-nino years old can step a lively clip 
for a little ways. 

Lady Dexte;- by Dexter Prince, the very handsome 
buggy mare owned by Rev. Father Power of Liver- 
more foaled dead twins by Mr. James Butler's stal- 
lion Directwell last week. 



An effort is to be made to have the Legislature pro- 
vide for an annual agricultural fair in each of the 
eight Congressional districts in California. A gocd 
plan if it can be put through. 



A colt stake is to be trotted at Dixon on May Day 
and several purse races given. The little town at the 
northern end of Solana County is getting to be one of 
the best horse towns on the coast. 



Applications are coming in every few days to 
Secretary Kelley from parties who desire to get iheir 
colts in Stake No. 4 of the Breeders Futurities, time 
of substitution in which will expire on March 1st. 



The trotting gelding, Young Stamboul that low- 
ered his mark to 2:14* last season, is out of Lida by 
Nephew, second dam, Fanny Trahern, dam of Voucher 
2:22, bv Patchen Vernon, son of George M. Patchen, 

Jr. 2:27. 

A catalogue of the Village Farm horses to be 6old 
by the Fasig Tipton Company at Its big Midwinter 
sale January 30th to February 3rd has been received. 
Some of the brood mares and stallions ought to come 
to California. 

With 7(5 three-year-olds paid up on the Breeders 
Futurity for this year, there will be quite a bunch of 
three-year-olds in training in California by the first 
of March. No State can show a better bred or finer 
looking lot of youngsters. 



The fastest matinee horse owned in Osbkosb, Wis- 
consin, is the California mare Primrose 2:13 by Fal- 
rose. On the track or down the snow path, she can 
lead them all. She is owned at the present time by 
Alderman J. J. Stevenson of that city. 

Nathan Strauss has sold the fast pacer, Tony M., 
2:14J to Gen. Nelson A. Miles, now on the Massachus- 
etts Governor's staff as Inspector General. General 
Miles is an enthusiastic road driver, and will no doubt 
take a prominent part in the Boston Matinees. 



Barney Simpson has sold his gelding by Don Derby 
2:04J, dam Cy rene 2:27 J by Guide 2:16, son of Director, 
second dam Alice R., dam of three in the list, by 
Naubuc, sire of the dam of Directly 2:03}, to Charles 
De Ryder, who will train him for the Grand Circuit. 



It is claimed that by nailing a strip of sheepskin 
about eight inches in width the entire length of the 
manger, selecting a skin covered with long wool and 
sprinkling it freely with cayenne pepper and renew- 
ing it occasionally, the worst cribber may be cured of 
the habit. , • 

Barney Demarest wants to buy a pacer that can 
lower old Flying Jib's record of 1:58} made with run- 
ning mate. The record has stood since 1894 and we 
do not recall that any pacer has ever been hooked up 
with a runner and an effort made to lower it, but 
although Dan Patch has paced in 1:56 "all by his 
lonely" it will probably require more than one trial 
before any other pacer will equal or lower the mark 
set by the Algona gelding that is now enjoying life at 
the farm of his owner Geo. A. Davis of Pleasanton. 



Iran Alto 2:12} will make the season at Woodland 
and has quite a number of good mares already booked. 
Those who look his colts over will want to breed to 
this stallion, the fastest of the get of the great Palo 
Alto 2:08}. He is a great sire of speed considering 
his opportunities 

Breeders' Futurity No 5, is guaranteed to be worth 
$7000. It closed October 15th last and is for the foals 
of mares bred in 1904. If you are in stay in by mak- 
ing second payment on 1st of February. If you are 
not in, get in by applying for one of the very few sub- 
stitutions that will be for sale. 



Santa Rosa will give a harness meetiDg this year, 
so one of the leading horse breeders of that prosperous 
city, told us this week. Woodland will be in line with 
a meeting. Pleasanton proposes to repeat its big 
success of last year, and the P. C. T. H. B. A. will 
give a meeting somewhere. That's four meetings that, 
are certain. What track will be the next to cc me in? 



Washington's Birthday will be celebrated at Santa 
Cruz with colt races held during the afternoon, and 
between heats there will be a parade of the best 
stallions, broodmares and coltsowned in tbe neighbor- 
hood. The races will be half-mile heats, best two in 
three. Two colts by Henry Nutwood, and one by 
Quervo are entered and the prize is a set of harness. 
Santa Cruz sadly needs the race track which failed to 
materialize. With the beautiful climate and quick- 
drying soil, a track would be a success. The pastures 
are rich and numerous and nearly all fenced with 
wood, so there is nothing to fear from barb wire. Our 
occasional correspondent, A. N , who furnishes the 
above, says it looks a9 if 1905 will be good to the 
people of Santa Cruz county. 



The well known wood and coal dealer of Oakland, 
Mr. R. P. M. Greeley, who owns Winnie Wilkes 2:17} 
and has bred three fast youngsters from her by 
Diablo, McKinney and Searchlight, has been con- 
fined to his home the past four weeks with illness, but 
is getting better and hopes to *>e out again soon, a 
hope that his many friends will rejoice to see ful- 
filled. 

In all the lists of sires of new 2:30 performers for 
1904, published so far, the name of Stormy John has 
been omitted. A Fresno correspondent writes us that 
Stormy John is by Sidney Arnett (sire of Joe W 7 heeler 
2:07 J) and is the sire of Selda 2:20 that took her 
record at Tulare last fall. We would like to hear 
from tbe owner of Stormy John as to his horse's 
breeding on the dam's side. 



A five-year-old mare by McKinney out of Eveline, 
thedam of Ole 2:1 1, Roblet 2:12, Ti'etam 2:19, Maud 
Fowler 2:21} (dam of Sonoma Girl), McPherson, trial 
2:14, etc., is offered for sale by Thos. Bonner of this 
c'ty. This mare is not large, but she is sound and all 
right. The great producing mare Green Mountain 
Maid was not 15 hands high, but she is the dam of 9 
standard trotters and four producing sons, including 
the great Electioneer. See Mr. Bonner's ad in an- 
other column. 

Mr. W. H. Lumsden, of Santa Rosa, visited Pleas- 
anton this week and engaged stall room for his two 
colts by Bonnie Direct 2:05} and his stallion McPher- 
son by McKinney, all of which will be trained there 
during the coming season. McPherson is a magnifi- 
cent looking trotter with great speed and while he 
has no record, is capable of trotting in 2:10 when in 
shape. The two youngsters by Bonnie Direct, are fine 
lookers and good prospects; one a trotter, the other a 
pacer. 

Brook Curry of Lexington wants to match his trot- 
ting mare Bettie Brook by Silent Brook against any 
five-year-old mare in the country. He suggests that 
owners of five-year-old mares shall each make up a 
sweepstake of $1000 each and pull the race off at any 
date on which the majority agree. He calls the 
special attention of the owners of Sadie Mac and 
Senorita to this challenge. It might be that Mr. 
James De La Montanja of San Francisco might enter 
his mare Tuna 2:08J in thi9 race, and if she started 
she wouldn't be last. The race would be a big draw- 
ing card for any track. 



Running bred horses do not always bring big fig- 
ures at auction as the following from the San Francis- 
co Examiner of Friday shows: "The sale of Hildreth 
mares yesterday was a decided frost. No one ap- 
peared to want them at any price and they were 
knocked down in succession to Harry Stover. He 
secured Rio Hondo and La Salinas for$100 each and 
Mitten only brought the paltry sum of $40. Don 
Cameron purchased the yearling colt by Rubicon out 
of Rio Hondo for $35. Other mares and colts of tbe 
Papinta Stock Farm, were offered but there were no 
bids." 

H. B. Smith of Ukiah reports the bad news that 
his mare May Ayers 2:23} lost her foal by Wayland 
W. 2:12£ this week and tbat be will have a nomina- 
tion in Breeders Futurity No 5 to dispose of. The 
four-year-old filly by Lynwood W. out of May Ayers 
is now at Pleasanton in the hands of John Quinn, who 
also is training the colt Dumont S., a full brothpr to 
Sonoma Girl that belongs to Thos. Charlton of Ukiah, 
Cal. Abe Marks of the 6ame place has sent his mare 
Cecille M. by Robin, dam by Redwood, to Richard 
Abies of Santa Rosa, who will take her to Pleasanton 
in a few days. She should trot in 2:15, barring ac- 
cidents. 

At the Fresno track Charles Middleton has eight 
head in training, a three-yerr-old trotter by Sidney 
Arnett that can trot a quarter in forty seconds, Sid- 
ney Barrett, a three-year-old pacer by the same horse 
out of a mare by Strathway, King Pin, a two-year-old 
trotter by Athadon, dam by Red Wilkes, Nana C , a 
two-year-old pacer by Strathway, dam by Majeeter, 
Queen Pomona, a four-year-old pacer by Pomona, 
that has been a quarter in 38 seconds, Dan S., a three- 
year-old pacer by Athablo, dam by Dawn, Poverty 
Row. a two-year-old trotter by Strathway, dam Miss- 
issippi by Red Nuttle, that is entered in the Breeders 
Futurity for this year, Teunakehia, a two-year-old by 
Athablo, dam Lect 2:27 by Electic, also entered in 
tbe stake and has trotted a quarter in 40 seconds. 
Joe Depoister has Bollivar by El Capitan and Milton 
Gear by Harry Gear. S. Walton has ten head of 
colts, Charles Clark has ten tro'ters and pacers at his 
place near tbe track, and Joe Schooling has five head, 
one by Lustridon that has all tbe looks and actions of 
a fast trotter. Fresno track is quite a lively place on 
work-out days. 



Through Mr. S. Christianson of this city Mr. W. A. 
Clark, Jr. has affected the purchase from Walter 
Hobart of ten standord bred mares and colts as fol- 
lows: She 2:I2J by Abbotsford 707, Hazel Wilkes 
2:11} by Guy Wilkes, a mare by Directum 2:05} out of 
Tuna 2:12} by Ethan Allen, Jr.; two fillies by Nutwood 
Wilkes, one out of She 2:12J; three colts and fillies by 
McKinney 2:11}, one of them a grand looking four- 
year-old out of Hazel Wilkes, another out of Tuna 
The three McKinneys are to be sent to Los Angeles 
where Ted Hayes will train them. The mares and 
fillies willbesentto Pleasanton and bred to Strath- 
way 2:19 sire of Toggles 2:08A, John Caldwell 2:11}, 
etc. 

One of the world's records made in 1904 was the 
2:07} of The Monk and Equity, driven by their owner 
C. K. G. Billings, to pole Double team driving has 
not been very much in vogue of late years. At best it 
is a difficult matter to put together a pair of horses 
enough alike in gait and disposition to make a pleas- 
ant driving team, and when in addition to the quali- 
ties named a grest amount of speed is essential, there 
is Btill further trouble in store. It takes the patience 
of Job, tbe purse of a millionaire, a first class trainer, 
a good driver, and some luck in ihe matter of track 
and weather conditions to bring about a world's 
record for double teams, an3 tbe horse world owes 
Mr. Billings a d?bt of gratitude for what he has done 
in that line. As a sort of side line he trained several 
of his fast trotters undor saddie and rode them some 
merry miles, so that as an all around reins man he un- 
questionably has the honors. 



Lost Check Recovered. 



On December 31, Mr. C. A. Arvedson of College 
City, California, wrote bis check for $10 and enclosed 
it in a letter to Secretary Kelley of the Breeders' 
Association, as sixth payment on his colt Rettus by 
Sutter, dam by Waldstei", entered in the Breeders' 
Futurity to be trotted this year. The letter did not 
reach Mr. Kelley and when the list of those making 
payments was printed in the Breeder and Sports- 
man, Mr. Arvedson wondered why his colt's name 
did not appear, (knowing he had made the payment 
in time). Considerable correspondence ensued be- 
tween Mr. Kelley and Mr. Arvedson, but no trace of 
the letter or check could be found until last Thursday 
morning when Mr. Downer, foreman of the Breeder 
and Sportsman's composing rooms, opened out an 
old newspaper exchange that had been thrown aside, 
and from it fell the letter written by Mr. Arvedson 
four weeks previous. The letter contained the check 
and was stamped by the Postoffice as having reached 
San Francisco, January 1st. It had been put into the 
big drawer at the Postoffice among the large bunch of 
exchanges received that day and lay between the 
pages of one of them until Mr. Downer luckily opened 
the paper for the purpose of starting a fire. Had he 
taken up any other paper from the pile, the letter 
would probably never have come to light. Probably 
some of our readers will see in this event the prognos- 
tication of a lucky career for Rettus, and should he 
win the stakeor any part of it the story of the loss 
and recovery of the letter and money that kept him 
eligible to the stake will be told many times. 



Los Angeles Matinee Races. 

The last matinee for 1901 was held by the Los An- 
geles Driving Club December 26th. A large crowd 
attended. The results were as follows: 

First Event— Driving Cup for 2:25 trotters. 

JasperPaulsen.bg (J. M Snodgrass) 1 l 

Katherine, b m (J Desmond) 2 2 

Neerblrd (R J. Adcocki 3 3 

Time— 2:21, 2:21*4. 

Second Event -Garland Cup for 2:20 pacers. 

Casey.bg (P.B.Michel) 1 1 

Glen (G. A Pounder) 2 2 

Willets - (A. M. Wilson) 4 3 

Willie Jib (R.A.Smith) 3 4 

Athalo (J. G. McGinnis) 5 5 

Time-2:20, 2:17*. 

Third Event— Erkenbrecber Cup for free for-all paoers. 

Welcome Mack, br g (E. J. Delarey) 1 1 

Midnight (W. M. Bartee) 2 3 

Stanton Wilkes (A. W. Rruner) 4 « 

Toughnut (Dr. C. W. Bryson) 3 4 

Tlme-2(HK, 2;\2%. 

Fourth Event— Christopher Cup for free-for-all trotters. 

BrineyK.,bg (R. Smith) 1 1 

Rozell, g g (J- Desmond) 2 2 

Time-2:lflW. 2:19M. 

Fifth Event— L. A. D C. Cup for 2:30 trotters. 

Geo. Anderson, b g ' (Dr. Dodge) S 1 1 

Red Ray. b h (B. F McElhany) 1 2 3 

Gen. Boodle (Goo. Nickerson) 2 3 2 

Ttme-2:27?K, 2:28^, 2:27. 



January 21, 19(5 



################## 



Tip 



J£ THOROUGHBREDS. 
################## 

The principal topic of discussion in turf circles dur- 
ing the past week has been the lack of "form" to a 
vast majority of the races and the failure of the 
officials at Emeryville to punish the offenders, chief 
of which is Jockey Travers, who bestrides horses for 
Dr. H. E. Rowell. Last Saturday the Doctor's good 
bay mare, Briers 104 lbs. up, ridden by Davis over a 
muddy track, at a mile and a sixteenth, won pulled 
up by four lengths from Dungannon, which was five 
lengths before Modicum (104 lbs). By the chart 
Briers beat Modicum nine lengths, in a common 
canter, at even weights. Monday, over the same 
kind of course and at the same distance, thougb with 
a difference in his favor of six pounds, Modicum beat 
Briers, with the aforesaid Travers up, over a length. 
Allowing that Briers had six pounds "up her sleeve" 
when she defeated Modicum on Saturday, she "goes 
back" some twenty-seven pounds in a period of two 
days. The betting, too, indicated that the mare 
would not "run her race" on Monday. Opening at 8 
to 5, thousands of dollars went in on her chances, and 
her odds were cut to 7 to 5. However, a world of Modi- 
cum coin came in, his price being forced from 5J to 
1 to 4 to 1 by post time — 18 to 5 in some books — while 
Briers' quotations were 9 to 5 at the close, plenty of 
it, and some pencilers yelling to come and get it. 
Travers got off well with Briers, and going past the 
judges' stand was first, with the boy "going down for 
wraps." At the half-mile ground Briers had been 
taken back until she was absolutely last. In the 
homestretch she was second, but in the very deepest 
of the going, and so bad was Travers' exhibition that 
several yelled with rage and one or two ahoutedj 
"Why don't you fall off, Travers?" If a more glaring 
reversal of form ever was observed within a period of 
forty-eight hours it has never come under my notice. 
Viewed from any angle, Travers should not be allowed 
to burn any more money in this part of the world. If 
he is incompetent he should be disbarred, and if com- 
petent and crooked the same course should be pur- 
sued. On Friday, January 13th, Albemarle, over a 
sloppy track, beat Haioault and the consistent Bell 
Reed by a narrow margin at six furlongs. On Tues- 
day, January 17th, be was beaten eleven and one-half 
lengths by The Reprobate, which came in for the 
fiercest plunge noted at the Emeryville track this 
season, his price being forced down from 4to 1 to 8 to 
5, the prices of the supposed contenders naturally 
going back. The judges in this case acted promptly 
in suspending J. Quinlan's horses, pending investiga- 
tion of Albemarle's running. On Saturday, Ishlana 
showed marked improvement in the last race and 
Stilicho the reverse, and in the second event that 
afternoon Melar, which had just defeated Del Carina 
and other good ones, was beaten nearly fifteen lengths 
by The Reprobate, and finished "outside of the 
money." On Monday, Fay Templeton, a heavily 
played favorite, wound up ninth in a ten-horse field; 
Hipponax, another choice, eighth in a nine-horse 
race; Brennus, a first choice, second; Theodora L , 
favorite, third; and Briers in the same condition as 
described above. Tuesday there was considerable 
improvement in the running, from a form student's 
standpoint, four decided favorites and an equal first 
ehoice finishing in front. 



day to shine. Tuesday McBride was first on Dun- 
gannon and Dr. Shorb J. Boyd rode his first winner 
of the meeting on Gateway that afternoon, and it is to 
be hoped this will encourage the lad so that he will 
get into his old winning stride. 



Nothing new has developed in the racing situation 
in the Middle West and South except that a bill is 
soon to be introduced in the Illinois Legislature by 
some Chicagoan which will cut off the distribution of 
all race track information so far as pricesand changes 
of prices are concerned, and the festive "tricker" will 
be relegated to the junk-shop, to the despair of the 
pool-room king, J im O'Leary. Newspapers will not 
be allowed to print any "tips" either, if the proposed 
bill becomes a law. In Missouri the official ax has 
not fallen as yet, but it is pretty safe to say it will be- 
fore long, and the "dull thud" will be particularly 
sickening to Messrs. Cella, Adler and Tilks, chiefs of 
the racing trust masquerading under the name of the 
Western Jockey Club. The new Governor, Folk, had 
as his chief opponent at thelast convention, one Harry 
Hawes, a Police Commissioner of St. Louis, and a 
"machine hand" for fair. Hawes wanted to be 
Governor himself, and did his utmost to keep Folk 
from getting the Democratic nomination. But the 
FoIk tide wa9 irresistible, and Hawes went to the 
undertaker. Hawes and Cella, Adler and Tilles have 
long gone hand in-hand, according to those who 
should know, and one of the best ways for Folk to 
even up the score on Hawes will be to have the present 
breeders' bill cut off the statute book. If this is done 
and racing i9 limited to thirty days on any track it 
will mean much to the turnstiles of the Mound City, 
for they have but three tracks in and around St. 
Louis, and ninety days would not satisfy the cravinge 
of their hearts. Besides, upon the killing of the 
breeders' law pool-rooms would spring up in the 
Missouri metropolis like buildings in a "boom town," 
and the profits of race track membership would 
crumble until it would take a powerful microscope to 
discern them. The Missouri State Auditor's "graft" 
(he is the individual who under the breeders' law 
directly licensed gambling on races) would then be 
but a memory, and another case of holding out hopes 
for licenses to rivals of Cella, Adler and Tilles to the 
last moment and then dashing them to the ground 
(for reasons best known to himself) could not occur. 
Giving the hogs in men's clothing all the rope they 
asked for has, I hope, been instrumental in doing a 
lot of good in Missouri Out of evil much good often 
comes in this world. 

E. S. Paddock, who in years agone bred several 
good winners by Rathbone, is again breeding horses, 
this time at Concord, Contra Costa county. He owns 
the once good race mare Francesca II., sister to 
Acdaim and Royal Flush, and from her has bred the 
three-year-old filly Radiant by El Rayo, a two-year- 
old colt and a yearling filly by Santello. Loyana (by 
the Australian Loyalist) is another of Mr. Paddock's 
mares, she is the dam of the promising two-year-old 
Santee. Mercedita by imp. Creighton has a yearling 
colt by Santello that Mr. P. is exceedingly sweet on. 
Santello was a very fast hor,se in W. J. Spiers' stable, 
and a colt by him from Loyana that the turfman lost 
last winter, gave promise of being a turf phenomenon. 
Mr. Paddock believes in the Hennie Farrow family, 
and I agree with him heartily, as it is,, by the figures, 
the best on the Coast for the production of high class 
racers. Ralph H. Tozer. 



Tam O'Shanter was brought up from Los Angeles 
late last week, and was the medium of a regular swine 
slaughtering on Monday. Getting away rather poorly, 
he had headed the doggy Sterling Towers before the 
half mile ground was reached, and from this out it 
was "no race," the Kingston-Ben-My-Chree gelding 
winning easily by three lengths. 



The struggle over Jockey Willie Knapp's services 
has resulted in a verdict for Puerl Wilkerson and the 
ruling off of Papa Knapp, who swore he did not fign 
the contract in question. A comparison of the signa- 
ture with that on other documents, however, con- 
vinced the stewards of the Pacific Jockey Club that it 
was Mr. Knapp's writing. Walter Jennings has 
virtually made arrangements for the lad's services 
until late in March, when the Wilkerson contract 
comes to an end. A peculiar feature of that docu- 
ment is that it calls for a bonus of but $20 per month, 
when as is well known, a dozen different owners would 
be willing to give from $200 to $300 per month for 
first call on Knapp. 

Just now Jockey McBride is more in the public eye 
than any other boy riding at Emeryville, except 
possibly Davis. On Saturday McBride piloted The 
Reprobate and Ishlana to victory and was second on 
Capt. Burnett and Dungannon. Monday he did no 
ride a winner, but was second twice. It was Minder's 



zigzagging in the last fifty yards and after delibera- 
tion, the heavy fine was imposed. 

There is an unusually finelotof three year-olds here 
at present, and it is doubtful which is the best, as 
those which have shown the best form have not met 
as yet. A condition race which would secure entries 
from Gold Rose, Descuento and Oxford would give 
racegoers an opportunity to compare the merits of 
these youngsters, all of which have shown remarkable 
speed and stamina. Gold Rose, out of seven starts, 
has been defeated but once, on which occasion she 
was left standing at the post. Most of her races have 
been run with light weight, but she has shown a won- 
derful burst of speed at all distances, and has run the 
fastest mile ever run in California in a race. Des. 
cuentohaswon all of his four starts and has won so 
easily that nobody really knows how good he is; while 
Oxford, although twice defeated out of four starts, 
has shown class qualities that would entitle him to 
consideration in any field of horses which could be got 
together. Pasadena has not started as yet, but on 
his New York form is entitled to rank with the best 
of them. Of the second division the best areprobably 
El Otros, Capitanazo, Cutter, Tramotor, Blue Coat, 
Homebred and R. L. Johnston. 

Probably the most unsatisfactory thing connected 
with racing in this part of the country is the appren- 
tice allowance, which is claimed indiscriminately by 
owntrs, who many times destroy their horses chances 
by employing incompetent pilots for the sake of get- 
ting the extra five-pound allowance. There are many 
good and experienced jockeys here who do not get as 
many mount9 as they should for this reason, and in 
fact some of the most noted jockeys in the country 
are walking round the betting ringdnring the races 
while a lotof stable boys are doing the riding. It is 
due to the public who like to wager on the result of 
the races to give them the best to be had for their 
money and something should be done to correct this 
evil. The rule which would limit the allowance to a 
boy when riding for his own stable only, would put a 
stop to the present unsatisfactory state of affairs. 

A. J. Joyner, who trains and manages J. B. Hag- 
gin's horses on the Jockey Club tracks is here, and is a 
daily attendant at the track. It is very gratifying to 
notice the growing interest taken in winter racing by 
horsemen who have heretofore not been disposed to 
encourage it. Geo. B. Kelley. 



From Los Angeles. 

The Santa Catalina Selling Sweeptakes, was run 
last Saturday and first money $1470 was won by Tim 
Payne, a four-year-old gelding by Star Ruby-Lady 
Brig who ran the fastest and best race he has shown 
here coming from behind his field and running the 
seven furlongs in 1:25}; a new track Vecord and equal 
to Geyser's Coast record made at Tanforan. Luckett 
was second and Cerro Santa third, several lengths 
away. 

Jockey McMahon, tho steeple chase rider, was sus- 
pended indifinitely for a suspicious looking ride on 
Flea. Judge Hamilton also fined W. Dugan $250 for 
rough riding in tho handicap on Saturday. Dugan 
had the mount on Schoolmate and in a driving finish 
allowed his mount to swerve towards the rail and 
then pulled him out to the center of the track. 
Whether the horse interfered with any other or not, 
is a question, but at all events, Sais and lOlie — both of 
which were on equal terms with Schoolmate fifty 
yards from the wire — collided and both fell heavily 
right at the finish and in front of theonconiing bunch. 
High Chancellor cleared tho fallen horses like a 
steeplechaser going over a jump and Rough Rider 
barely escaped falling over tbem. It was a close'call 
for Jockeys Miller and Moriarity, both of whom es- 
caped uninjured It was a question in the judge's 
mind just how much blame to attach to Dugan for 



Pony Racing Next Saturday. 

The officers of the California Polo and Pony Racing 
Association have arranged a sweepstakes matinee of 
racing' to be held on the 28th inst. on the private 
track of Charles W. Clark at San Mateo. 

The ponies have been in training for some time, and 
this will afford an opportunity to work them out in 
public. Entries willcloseon Wednesday of nexo week. 
Tho entry fee will be $5, with an additional $5 from 
non-starters. The latter fee will be exacted in an 
effort to stop the wholesale scratching which has been 
done at recent meetings. 

One race will be for men who have never riddon a 
winner at this association'9 race meetings. 

The association is planning an ambitious meeting 
for February 22d, when a special programme will be 
prepared. The forthcoming matinee races are as fol- 
lows: 

The Scurry sweepstakes — Top weight 165 pounds, 
two pounds allowed for each one-quarter inch under 
14 hands 2 inches. Previous winneis this year to 
carry seven pounds additional. Three-sixteenths of a 
mile. 

The Corinthian sweepstakes — Top weight 160 
pounds, two pounds allowed for each one-quarter inch 
under 14 hands, 2 inches. Pravious winners this year 
to carry fi^e pounds extra. To be ridden by qualified 
riders who have never ridden a winner at this associa- 
tion's race meetings. Distance three-eights of a 
mile. 

The Stick and Ball sweepstakes— For polo ponies, 
catch weights, minimum weight 140 pounds. For 
bona fide polo ponies, th it have, been played at least 
two full periods in a match or practice game in 1904 
or 1905. Distance 300 yards. 

The Flash sweepstakes — Top weight 175 pounds, 
allowed for each one quarter inch under 11 hands 2 
inches. Previous winners this year to carry five 
pounds extra; maidens allowed seven pounds. Dis- 
tance one-quarter mile. 

The Ladies' plate — Top weight 155 pounds, two 
pounds allowed for each one-quarter inch under 14 
hands 2 inches. Previous winners this year to carry 
six pounds extra: maidens allowed five pounds. The 
owner of the the winner, in addition to the stakes, 
will be presented with a handsome trophy, the gift of 
tho lady patrons of the association. Distance six 
furlongs. 

Jackson's Napa Soda does not tangle the feet 



8 



[January 21, 19(5 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 



Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Pacific Coast Field Trials. 



[By Albert Betz.] 

The twenty-second annual trials of the Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club were held near Bakersfield, Kern 
County, Cal., throughout the week beginning January 
9, 1905 with the following stakes, viz: 

Darby, with seventeen 6tarters — Purse $510, divided 
50% to first, 80% tosecond, and 20% to third. In ad- 
dition each winner received a handsome and valuable 
trophy. 

All-Age, with twenty starters — Purse $470, 
divided 50% 30% and 20%, and trophies to each 
winner. 

Champion Stake— Prizes: Pacific Coast Champion 
Cup, to be won twice before becoming property of 
owner of winner, and cup do — for runner up. 

Members' Stake — Prizes: Trophiesdonated by mem- 
bers of the club. 

Mr. Henry L. Betten of Alameda, Cal., judged with 
impartiality and fairness, and hi9 decisions were well 
received. He showed himself thoroughly familiar with 
climatic conditions and the habits of our birds, a great 
ad vantage over an Eastern man unfamiliar with our 
conditions and birds. 

The trials were the most succsssful ever held by the 
association. Conditions were perfect, and birds were 
plentiful. Of the seventeen Derby starters, noDe 
lacked bird work and none failed to take advantage of 
that fact. It is questionable if any field trials has ever 
disclosed such a splendid lot of Derbies; not a bad one 
amongst them. Ladylike, winner of first, Is a worthy 
descendant of that grand and consistent performer, 
Terry's Lady. Mariposa, winner of second, is a hand- 
some black, whiteand tan Setter, and should be heard 
from in the future, as likewise should Del Rey Belle 
and Chiquita, awarded equal third. 

Harry H., winner of first in All-Age, has several 
times competed in our trials without being placed, but 
has been a winner in the Pacific Coast Northwestern 
trials. He is stylish, a great ranger, and showed ex- 
cellent judgment in locating birds. 

Cuba Jr., winner of second, is well known to field 
trialers, being a winner not only in our trials but hav- 
ing taken many places in Eastern trials in his Derby 
year. 

Jay M., equal third with Ladylike heretofore men- 
tioned, is a splendid goer, and with better bird work 
will be hard to beat. 

Dr. Daniels in the Pacific Coast Champion Stake 
clearly demonstrated his superiority over the dogs 
entered against him. In this stake the heats were of 
iwo hours duration. 

The annual meeting of the club was held on Wed- 
nesday evening, January 11, and was largely attended. 
The following officers were re-elected for the ensuing 
year: W. W. Van Arsdale, San Francisco, President; 
Clinton E. Wortien, San Francisco, First Vice-Presi- 
dent; H. W. Keller, Santa Monica, Second Vice- 
President; Albert Betz, San Francisao, Secretary- 
Treasurer. Executive Committee — C. N. Post, Sacra- 
mento; W. S Tevis, San Francisco; John H. Schu- 
macher, Los Angeles; T. J. A. Tiedemann and W. W. 
Richards, San Francisco. 

The following named gentlemen were proposed for 
and elected to membership: Elmer Cox, Madera, Cal.. 
E. N. Briggs, S. Christensen, Frank V. Bell, J. B. 
Hauer, Arthur Burton and A. Muller, San Francisco; 
Lee J. Rose, Oxnard; S. P. Maslin, Sacramento: W. 
H. Hanlon; F. H. Jermyn, Scranton, Pa ; Stanley 
Woods, U. S. N.; Frank Schumacher, Los Angeles; 
Vernon li. Rood, San Diego; L. McDaniels, Temple- 
ton; J. H. Henry, Atascadero; Fred Tegeler, Bakers- 
field; J. H. Williams, Porcerville; J. M. Donley, Fresno; 
Dr. A. M. Barker, San Jose, and L. S. Chittenden, 
Hanford. 

Among those noted present were: W. W. Van Ars- 
dale, Clinton E. Worden, J. B. Hauer, S. Christensen, 
W. W. Richards and wife, Frank H. Mayer, W S. 
Tevis, Floyd S. Judah, H. T. Payne, Dr. Creagh, Dr. 
C. W. Hibbard, Robt. A. Smyth, J. W. Flynr, 
Albert Betz, E. N Briggs, J. M. Kilgarif, R. B. 
Woodward and others, San Francisco; Judge C. N. 
Post and Jos. E. Terry, Sacramento; H. W. Keller, 
Santa Monica; J. H. Schumacher, Frank Schumacher, 
H. P. Anderson, Gen. C. F. A. Lash, Los Angeles; 
Vernon R. Rood, San Diego; L. McDaniels, Temple- 
ton; F. H. Jermyn, Scranton, Pa ; Fred Tegeler, Sir. 
Taylor, R L. McKinley, and others of Bakersfield; 
Dr. A. M. Barker, San Jose; Mr. Lang and Mr. J. 
Moomaw, Porterville; Elmer Cox, Madera; J. M. 
Donley, Fresno; A. G. Park, Hanford; Captain W. H. 
McKittrick aod Gen. W. R. Shafter, R. M. Dodge, 
A. S. Carlisle, Miss A6he, Bakersfield: Ensigrn Stanley 
Woods, U. S. N.; W. B., Fred and Cbas. Coutts, Ken- 
wood; J. E. Lucas, San Clemente; C. H. Babcock, Del 
Rey; Wm Dormer, Oakland; A. G. Park, Hanford; 
Col. Wheeler, U. S. A., and many others. 

THE DERBY. 

The Derby drawing was held on Sunday evening, 
seventeen entries paying the starting fee, viz.: 

J. W. Flynn's Pointer bitch Nellie P. with Stock- 
dale Kennels' Pointer do;.? Checkmate 



J. W. Flynn's Pointer dog Romp On with W. W. 
Van Arsd lie's Setter bitch Modesto. 

J.E.Terry's Setter dog Romp with J. H. Schu- 
macher's Setter dog Sir Roderick. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba's Japan wi„h 
J. W. Flynn's Pointer dog Burbank. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Mariposa with J. 
E. Terrv's Setter dog Kenwood. 

Rose& Christensen'sSetter bitch Del Rey Belle with 
M. Lawrence's Setter bitch Youley. 

J. E. Terry's Setter dog Rival with W. B. Coutts' 
Pointer dog Bolin's Duke. 

J. E. Terry's Setter bitch Ladylike with A. Gregory 
Cadogan's Pointer bitch Chiquita. 

Mt. View Kennels' Pointer bitch Fandango, a bye. 

Monday, January 9, 1905— The start for the trial 
grounds was somewhat delayed on account of rain, 
hut at about 10 o'clock, there being signs of clearing, 
a start for the grounds was made and the tirdt brace, 
Nellie P., handled by Chas. Coutts, and Checkmate, 
handled by Dodge, were cast off in a field near Gosford 
Ranch at 11:40. After running some time Checkmate 
camo to point, but handler could not raise birds. 
Nellie P. soon caught scent and came to point, steady 
to shot. Checkmate pointed a rabbit and was backed 
by Nellie. This was the only work done during the 
heat. Both dogs were good goers, though Nellie was 
best in range. Up at 12:35. 

Romp On, handled by W. B. Coutts, and Modesto, 
handled by Babcock, cast off at 12:45. Birds were 
flushed by spectators after dogs and handlers had 
gone through them, and on dogs being turned Romp 
On was the first to find, the bird, however, flushing, 
the dog being steady to wing. On showed best in 
range, though Modesto was a very stylish goer, but 
was handicapped by reason of an injury received uhe 
day before. Romp again pointed and was backed by 
Modesto, both steady to wing, the bird flushing some 
distance ahead. Modesto also came to point, but a 
rabbit running within a few feet of her she left point 
and chased, soon, however, returning to handler. Up 
at 1:25. 

Luncheon was then partaken of at the Gosford 
Ranch, and at 2:40, the next brace: Romp, handled 
by Fred Coutts, and Sir Roderick, handW by W. B. 
Coutts, were cast off. Roderick soon ran into a bevy, 
but was steady to flush, and immediately afterwards 
came to point, evidently on running birds. Romp 
also pointed and Roderick backed to command. Rod- 
erick showed better range and speed, and shortly 
wheeled into a fine point, backed by Romp, and both 
were steady to shot. Each had several points, but 
Roderick had the better of the heat. Up at 3:35. 

Burbank, handled by tV. B. Coutts, and Cuba's 
Japan, handled by Dodge were cast off at 4:05 in a 
field below Canfield Ranch, after birds had been 
flushed from trees into open ground with none too 
much cover. Both were good merry workers, Bur- 
bank having a shade the better in range and speed. 
Each doe's condition being right and birds plentiful, 
they made a number of points in full view of spec- 
tators, though when first put down they unexpectedly 
ran upon birds and flushed a number before pointing. 
Both were steady to shot and wing. Up at 4:35. 
LaBt brace o: the day. 

Tuesday, January 10.— Rain had again fallen 
during the night but the morning showed clearing 
weather and a fairly early start was made. Weather 
wa9 cool, however, and the conditions most favorable 

Mariposa, handled by Babcock, and Kenwood 
handled by Fred Coutts, were cast off at 10:15 in a 
field known to the old timers, as the "mule field" — an 
open country with good cover and birds plentiful. 
Both fast, stylish, merry workers and good rangers, 
with Mariposa slightly the better in these respects, 
but liking rabbits. Soon after being down, Kenwood 
came to point, backed by Mariposa, but moved on, 
then again pointed but the handler could not 
raise bird. Mariposa was first to find birds, being 
steady to shot, four birds rising. Kenwood pointed 
but the bird flushed, steady to wing. Mariposa soon 
dropped to point in high cover, but moved on, again 
dropping to point, the bird being flushed by handler. 
Kenwood made another point from which the bird 
flushed, steady to wing. Both missed opportunities 
to point. Up at 10:55. 

Del Rey Belle, handled by Chas. Coutts, and 
Youiey, handled by Carlisle, were cast off at 11 a. m. 
near where the last brace was taken up; cover good 
with birds in quantity. Belle was first to find, snap- 
ping into a nice point, ti which she was steady to 
shot. Youley also pointed and was backed by Belle. 
Both steady. Belle shortly pointed a small bevy but 
flushed, which was followed by a point by Youley on 
a running bird to which he was backed by Belle. 
Both made several more points, one by Belle being of 
a sensational order. Both were somewhat unsteady 
at times Belle having the better of the heat, being 
the best goer and having a high head. Up at 11:35. 

Rival, handled by W. B. Coutts, and Bolin's Duke, 
handled by Chas. Coutts, were cast off at 12 m. near 
Canfield vineyard. Rival had been presented the day 
previous by J. E. Terry to Master Fargo Rose. Con- 
ditions in the vineyard were not of the best, but birds 
were in abundance. Duke was first to point and was 
somewhat unsteadily backed by Rival. Rival pointed 
and bird flushed, steady to wing. He asrain pointed 
but shortly after moved on, probably running 
bird, as cover was sparse. This was repeated 
several times. Duke made another point and was 
steady to shot. Up at 12:50 Thence to lunch at 
Gosford Ranch. 

Ladylike, handled by W. B. Coutts, and Chiquita, 
handled by Lucas, were cast off at 2:15 in a field east 



of the Canfield schoolhouse, where birds had been 
found the day before. Both were Bplendid, merry 
workers, wide rangers and gave the best exhibition 
up to that time. No birds were raised in this field 
but were found in adjoining field where some splendid 
work was had to thedelight of the spectators Lady- 
like had six points to her credit to four for the dog 
and was steadier than the latter. Up at 2:55. 

Fandango, handled by Lucas, was cast off at 3 P. M. 
in same field in direction where birds had been seen 
to go. When down only a few moments she ran into 
birds and flushed small bevy, and was inclined to 
chase, but was headed off by handler. In addition to 
being handicapped by deafness she ran into a barbed 
wire fence and injured herself so that she was out of 
the running, but held on gamely to end of heat. Up 
at 3:30. 

This ended the first series and the judge stated that 
he would announce dogs taken into second series when 
grounds on which next brace was to be run were 
reached. The announcement was as follows — eight 
being carried in no second series: Nellio P. with Sir 
Roderick, Ladylike with Mariposa, Del Rey Belle with 
Burbank and Chiquita with Cuba's Japan. 

SECOND SERIES. 

Nellie P. -Sir Roderick— Cast off at 4 P. U, Roderick 
showed better range and speed, but the bitch was oot 
far behind in that respect. He, however, was inclined 
to chase rabbits. Roderick was first to find, and on 
bird being flushed immediately made another, to 
which he was steady to shot. Nellie made one point 
but was outclassed by Roderick. Up at 4:35. 

Mariposa-Lady'.ike— Cast off at 4:40 in Section 17. 
This was a fine going brace, wide rangers and fast, 
showing classy work. Lady soon came to point under 
a tree, and was nicely backed by Mariposa. No birds, 
however, were raised. When the judge and riders 
came to where she had pointed birds were flushed 
from trees. Lady had evidently pointed on scent 
where they had been a short time before. Sent on 
she crossed dry ditch and came to a snappy, stylish 
point, to which a bird was flushed, she being steady 
to shot. Aside from pointing a rabbit, this was the 
only bird work done in the heat. Ladylike was bet- 
ter in speed and range. This concluded the day's 
running. 

Wednesday, January 11.— Del Rey Belle-Bur- 
bank — Cast off in Section 16, ground not heretofore 
run on. Both were fast goers, showing great range, 
but until on birds, ran as a pair, one trailing the other, 
probably due to their being kennel mates. Burbauk 
was first to reach birds, which were in lively cover, 
but he Bushed a small bevy, then came to point on a 
single, which was flushed by Belle stealing in. Bur- 
bank again pointed and was backed bj Belle. Sent 
on the latter snapped into a fine point and was steady. 
Another point was made by Burbank. Up at 10 A. M. 

One of the Derby dogs having been forgotten, sev- 
eral braces of the All-Age were run before the com- 
pletion of the Derby, the last brace of which, Chi- 
quita-Cuba's Japan, was cast off at 3:40 p. m. Japan 
seemed to be ''off. " He did not come up to his race 
of the day before and was greatly outclassed by Chi- 
quita, the latter having four points to the former's 
two. Both somewhat unsteady. Chiquita sustained 
her pace and range of the day before. Up at 4:35. 

At the conclusion of this heat Judge Betten an- 
nounced the vinners as follows: 

First— J. E. Terry's Ladylike. 

Second — W. W. Van Arsdale's Mariposa. 

Equal Third— Rose & Christensen's Del Rey Belle, 
A. Gregory Cadogan's Chiquita. 

ALL-AGE STAKE. 

The drawing for the All-Age Stake with twenty 
starters was held on Tuesday evening, January 11 
and resulted as follows: 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter bitch Keepsake with 
J. E. Terry's Setter dog Kilgarif. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer bitch Midget with J. A. 
Peeble s Setter dog Uncle J immie Whitestone. 

W. J. Morris' Pointer bitch Faith with Rose & 
Christensen's Setter bitch Belle Fontaine. 

C. H. Shaw's Pointer dog Oak Knoll with W. W. 
Van Arsdale's Setter dog Harry H. 

Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Cuba Jr. with W. 
W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog McCloud Boy. 

H. W. Keller's Setter bitch Sombra with J. W. 
Considine's Setter bitch Policy Girl. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Count's Mark with 
Stockdale Kennels' Pointer dog Glen wood 

J. H. Schumacher's Setterbitch Valita with W. W. 
Van Arsdale's Setter dog Avalon. 

J. E. Terry's Setter bitch Ladylike with Wm. 
Dormer's Mariposa (the latter haviog changed hands 
since completion of Derby.) 

W. W. Van Arsdale's Setter dog Jay M. with J. W. 
Flynu's Pointer dog Burbank. 

Wednesday, January 11 — The first All-Age brace 
cast off was Keopsake-Kilgarif, down at 10:10 in same 
field (Sec. 16) where first Derby braoe of the morning 
had been run. Both were wide rangers and although 
greatly unequal in size, Keepsake being one of the 
smallest Setters seen in trials, their speed was about 
the same. Kil was first to find, pointing a running 
bird, but holding his point. This was followed by a 
point by Keepsake, Kil backing — both steady — Kil 
secured another point, being backed by Keepsake, 
and toward end of heat the latter pointed In heavy 
cover, being steady to shot. Up at 11:04. Keepsake 
handled by Babcock, Kilgarif by Coutts. 

Midget, handled by Carlisle, and Uncle Jimmie 
Whitestone, handled by Lucas, were cast off in ad- 
joining Section (171 and were at once In birds before 
finishing cast. Both at first ran through birds which 
flushed all about. Midget was first to find, dropping 
to point and was steady to shot. Jimmie followed 
with a point, but the bird flushed, the dog being some- 
what unsteady. Jimmie was a bit uncertain in points 
though wider in range and faster, Midget being better 
on birds. Both made several points and backs, 
Midget having the greater number to her credit. Up 
at 12:05. 



January 21, 19C5J 



r 



Faith, handled by Carlisle, and Belle Fontaine, 
handled by W. B. Coutts, were cast off in a field south 
of Frazier's at 12:40, and this proved the only brace 
throughout the trials finding no birds. Neither bitch 
was in condition to run, and neither showed range or 
speed. At the conclusion of the heat lunch was par- 
taken of at the Gosford Ranch. 

OaK Knoll, handled by Carlisle, and Harry H., 
handled by Babcock, were cast off at 2:25 in field be- 
low the Canfield Ranch into which birds had been 
flushed. Harry H. showed greater range and more 
speed than the Pointer and outclassed him in style and 
bird work. Harry was first to find, three birds be- 
ing flushed, and quickly dropped to another poiut, 
beiDg steady in each instance. The Pointer followed 
with a point from which the bird flushed and he was 
steady to wing. Each made several more points and 
each on occasion backed. Both were steady to wing 
and shot, but Harry excelled in the respects above 
mentioned. The bird work was all done in full view 
of the spectators who highly appreciated the work of 
the dogs. Up at 3:10. This was the last brace of the 
All-Age, there being a brace of Derbies to be run. 

Thursday, January 12. — An early start was made 
and the first brace, Cuba Jr. handled by Dodge and 
McCloud Boy, handled by Babcock were cast off at the 
farthest point of the club's preserves, at 9:15 A. M. It 
was known where the birds lay and the dogs were cast 
off in another direction, before being put on birds. 
McCloud Boy was better in range, speed and style, but 
was outclassed by the Pointer in bird work. Cuba 
Jr. found first, pointing a small bevy, steady to shot, 
following with a point on a single which flushed. 
These were followed by several more points, on one of 
which he waT backed by McCloud Boy. The latter at 
first, seemed unable to locate birds, but later made 
two points, on one of which he broke in and was in- 
clined to chase — on bird work the heat belonged to 
Cuba — Up at 9:55. 

Sombra handled by Coutts and Policy Girl handled 
by Lucas were cast off at 10:15 at further end of same 
saaie field. Both were good rangers and were 
speedy, although Policy Girl had some difficulty in 
locating birds. Policy was first to come to point, but 
no bird could be raised. Sombra soon followed with a 
point to which she was steady, and on another point 
was backed by Policy Girl. Girl again pointed, pre- 
sumably on running bird. Sombra made another stylish 
point being steady to shot. Up at 10:45. 

Count's Mark, handled by Babcock with Glenwood 
handled by Dodge were cast off in same field, but 
failed to do any bird work, although birds were flushed 
by handlers and spectators. Glenwood made one 
point, evidently on running bird as none could be 
raised. Count's Mark showed best in range, style 
and speed. Up at 11:30. 

Valita, handled by Lucas and Avalon, handled by 
Babcock, were cast off in field adjoining Canfield 
schoolhouse, at 11:50 and after a short run were soon 
on birds. Both ivere good workers and were staunch, 
though Valita was scarcely in condition for a hard 
race. Point after point was made by the dogs, each 
backing on occasion, and their work was much ad- 
mired by the spectators. Avalon had somewhat the 
better of the heat. 

Ladylike, handled by Coutts and Mariposa, handled 
by Babcock, were cast off after lunch, at 2:15 below 
Canfield ranch. Lady was first to find, but the bird 
evidently ran as her handler could not raise a bird. 
Mariposa flushed and was steady to wing — then made 
a long chase after a rabbit, and appeared, on his re- 
turn, the better for it. Lady pointed near fence, 
backed by Mariposa, but left point as bird went 
through fence. Up at 2:57. 

Jay M , handled by Babcock and Burbank, handled 
by Coutts. Down at 3:35 in field adjoining Canfield 
schoolhouse Burbank was first to point, but moved 
on when handler went in, and again pointed on edge 
of plowed ground, and bird was seen to flush. Jay 
M. pointed twice in quick order, Burbank soon after 
whirled to a snappy point where bird had been seen 
to flush. Burbank again pointed and was backed by 
Jay M. Jay M. dropped to flush, Burbank again 
pointed in open ground, holding his point until bird 
was flushed by handler, and later Jay M. ran in and 
flushed birds and was steady to wing. Burbank ap- 
peared to have the better of the heat. Both, were 
good rangers and were fast goers, Jay M. probably 
having the better of it in speed and range Up at 3:35. 

This ended the first series and after reaching new 
grounds Judge Betten announced the following dogs 
taken into second series: Keepsake with Ladylike; 
Cuba Jr. with Harry H; Sombra with Jay M; Avalon 
with Uncle Jimmie Whitestone; Kilgarif and Mariposa 
in reserve. 

Keepsake-Ladylike — Down at 4:45 in Section 17. 
Both good goers, ranging well and showing great 
speed. Lady came to point though no bird was 
raised, but was backed by Keepsake. Later Lady 
made point from which bird was flushed, and the 
heat ended, when almost dark, with no further bird 
work. 

Friday, January 13— The first brace, Cuba Jr. 
and Harry H., were cast off at 8:25. Harry H. was 
better in range, style and speed, while Cuba showed 
better in bird work, little of this, however, being 
done — Cuba dropping to flush Up at 8:45. 

Sombra-Jay M. — Down at 9:15. Little bird work 
was done by this brace, Jay M. having the better of 
it, Sombra not sustaining her previous performance. 
Up at 9:50. 

Avalon-Uncle Jimmie Whitestone — Down at 10:08 
in Section 17 Both dogs soon pointed after running 
over birds, Jimmie being steady to shot. Avalon 
pointed, but left point Uncle soon again pointed, 
and bird flushed. Avalon also pointed but was some- 
what unsteady to shot. Uncle Jimmie showed better 
speed and range. Up at 10:30. 

Keepsake-Ladylike — The last brace of the All-Age 
were put down at Canfield schoolhouse at 10:10, and 
within a few moments both came to point within a 
short distance of each other. Ladylike was steady to 
shot, while Keepsake was inclined to chase when bird 
was flushed. Lady soon after dropped to flush and 



was steady to wing. Lady again pointed; being 
backed by Keepsake. Lady once again pointed and 
Keepsake coming up stole in and dropped as bird 
flushed. 

This proved the last brace of the All-Age and at its 
conclusion Judge Betten announced the winners as 
follows: Harry H , Urst; Cuba Jr., second; Ladylike 
and Jay M., equal third. 

PACIFIC COAST CHAMPION STAKE. 

This stake had four entries, viz: W. W. Van 
Arsdale's Pointer dog Dr. Daniels with J. E. Terry's 
Lady; Stockdale Kennels' Cuba Jr. with J. E Terry's 
Kilgarif. In this stake the heats were of two hours' 
duration. 

Lady handled by Coutts; Dr. Daniels by Babcock, 
down at 12:10 in what is known as the "mule field." 
In this heat a great deal of territory was covered and 
the dogs were down a considerable length of time be 
fore being put on birds, in which work as well as in 
staying qualities, Dr . Daniels greatly excelled, doing 
the betoer bird work, and sustairing his speed to the 
end, while Lady appeared to give out. In point work 
Dr. Daniels had much the better of it. 

Kilgarif handled by Coutts and Cuba Jr. by Dodge, 
were placed down after luncheon, which had been 
brought to the field in Section 17, and after working 
out this section for a considerablelength of time with- 
out finding birds, were taken across into another field 
where birds were found in quantity. Both dogs went 
well for some time, but the gruelling heats which they 
had previously run in the All-Age soon told on them 
and they slowed up considerably toward the end of 
the heat. Kilgarif maintained much better speed and 
range than Cuba and both made six or seven points 
to which they were steady. After the two hours run, 
the judges, H. W. Keller, having acted with Judge 
Betten, announced Dr. Daniels as winner with Lady 
as runner up 

MEMBERS' STAKE. 

The drawing for the Members' Stake took place on 
Friday evening, five entries being made, and resulted 
as follows: 

H. W. Keller's Setter bitch Sombra with J. W. 
Flynn's Pointer dog Burbank. 

J. M. Donley's Setter dog Monterey (litter brother 
to Sombra) with Hugh Hopkins' Setter bitch Rosa 
Ohm. (The latter was untrained and had never been 
on birds.) 

S. Christensen's Setter bitch Belle Fontaine a bye. 
Ten dollars to enter. The prizes were a trophy to 
each winner. 

Saturday, January 15— Sombra, handled by H. 
W. Keller, and Burbank, handled by J. W. Flynn, 
were cast off near Gosford orchard. Sombra did 
nearly all the bird work, making several points in a 
field where birds had been flushed by riders. The 
Pointer ranged weil but seemed unable to locate, 
though he backed the bitch on one of her points in 
the open field. Sombra had much the better of it in 
bird work and in range. This was the best going 
brace in the stake. 

Monterey-Rosa Ohm — Handled by the respective 
owners. Down in a new section known as the "cat 
field" where birds were plentiful. Monterey, a trained 
dog, made the only points in this heat, though his 
range was limited. The bitch had never before been 
down and had no experience on birds, her owner 
entering her merely to encourage the sport. 

Belle Fontaine, handled by S. Christensen was the 
bye dog, and at his request Judge Post ran his bitch, 
Merry Heart in company with Belle. Belle, while 
ranging well, although down nearly an hour, and 
having ample opportunity, flushing many birds, 
failed to make a point while Merry Heart being un- 
prepared and heavy in whelp score! several. After 
the dogs were ordered up, the Judge announced his 
decision as follows: First, Sombra; second, Burbank; 
third, Monterey. 

This ended the most successful trials ever run by 
the association and wa9 probably the best field trials 
run in the country during a year past. 



SUMMARIES. 



Bakersfield, Cal., January 9, 1905— Pacific 
Coast Field Trials Club's twenty-second annual trials. 
Deroy, for Setters and Pointers whelped on or after 
January 1, 1903. Purse, $510— three moneys, 50%, 
:i0% and 20% and trophy to each winner. $5 to nomi- 
nate, $5 seeond forfeit and $10 to start. 39 nomina- 
tions, 29 paid second forfeit; 17 starters — 8 Pointers. 
9 English Setters. H. L. Betten, Judge. 

I 

J. W. Flynn's (San Francisco) lemon and white Polntor bitch 
Nellie P. (Dr. Daniels-Senator's Mistress Nell, formerly Nellla 
Bang), whelped March 20, 1903. Breeder, owner; Cbas Coutts, 
handler. 

With 

Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield) liver and white Setter dog 
Checkmate (Cuba Jr -Bow's Daughter), whelped August 1, 1903. 
Breeder, owner; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

J. W. Flynn's lemon and white Pointer dog RompOn (Dr. Daniels- 
Senator's Mistress Nell), whelped March 20, 1903. Breeder, 
owner; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

W. W. Van Arsdale's (San Francisco) white, black and tan Setter 

bitch Modesto (Detroit Joe-Countess Mark), whelped March, 

1903. Breeder, owner; C. H. Babcock, handler. 
Jos. E. Terry's (Sacramento) orange and while Setter dog Romp 

(Orion-Terry's Lady), whelped July 25, 19o.'i. Breeder, owner; 

Fred Coutts, handler. 

With 

John H. Schumacher's (Los Angeles) black and white Setter dog 

Sir Brodorick (Detroit Joe-Dolores), whelped May 19, 1903. 

Breeder, owner; VV. B. Coutls, handler. 
StocUdalo Kennels' black and whlto Polntor dog Cuba's Japan 

(Ch. Cuba or Kenwood-Winnipeg Fly), whelped May 13, 1903. 

Breeder, ownor; Dodge, handler. 

With 

J. W. Flynn's black and white Pointer dog Burbank (Dr. Daniels- 
Senator's Mistress Nell), whelped March 20, 1903 Breeder, 
owner; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's white and tan Setter dog Mariposa (Detroit 
Joe-Countess Mark), whelped March. 1903. Breeder, owner; 
Babcock, handler. 

With 

Joe. E. Terry's white, black and tan Sottcr dog Kenwood 
(Kllgarlf-Iona S ), whelped June 28, 1903. Breeder, owner; Fred 
Coutts, handler. 

Rose and Christensen's white, black and tan Setter bitch Del Rey 
Belle (Cal. Bell Boy-Countess Mark), whelped October 21, 1903. 



Breeder. W. W. Van Arsdale, San Francisco; Chas. Coutts 
handler. 

With 

M. Lawrence's (Tallac) white and lemon Setter bitch Youley 
(Staruboul-Ruby 5th), whelped January 4, 19C3 Breeder War- 
ren A . Day, Los Angeles; A. S. Carlisle, handler. ' 

Jos. E. Terry's orange and white Setter dog Romp (Orlon-Terrv's 
Lady), whelped July 25, 1903. Breeder, owner; W. B. Coutts. 
handler. 

With 

W « ?/ P'VJ'f' 8 A l w env r? od V Cal ->' " ver on<1 "»>I to Polnterdog, 
Bolln sDuka (A iford's John-Florence Fauster), whelped Junes 
1903 Breeder, William Bolln, Warren. lid. Cha ? Coutts" 
handler. ' 

J -,f;- Te W. a (Sacamento) orange and white Setter bitch. Lady- 
like (Orion-Terry's Lady) whelped July 25, 1903. Breeder, 
owner, W. B. Coutts, handler. ' 
With 

A. Gregory Cadogan's (San Rafael) liver and white Pointer bitch 
Chequita (Dr. Daniels-Fan Oo) wholped May 17, 1903 Breeder 
Mt. View Kennels, San Rafael, Cal ; J E Lucas, handler. ' 

Mt. View Kennels' (San Rafael, Cal., J. E. Lucas Manacer) 
liver and white Pointer bitch Fandango. (Dr. Daniels-Fan Co 
whelped May 17, 1903. Breeder, owner, Lucas, handler. 
II 

Nellie P. with Sir Roderick. 
Ladylike with Mariposa. 
Del Rey Belle with Burbank. 
Chiqulta with Cuba's Japan. 

HBSUI/T. 

First, Ladylike; second, Mariposa; equal third, Del Rev Belle 
Chiquita. 1 

Bakersfield, January 11, 1905— Pacific Coast 
Field Trial Club's twenty-second annual All-Age 
Stake. Open to all Setters and Pointers Purse 
$470—50%, 30%, and 20% and trophy to each winner. 
$10 to nominate and $10 to start. 24 nominations; 17 
paid starting fees; 20 starters including 3 Derby dogs; 
14 English Setters, 7 Pointers. H. L. Betten, judge.' 
I 

W. W. Van Arsdale's (San Francisco) Hack, white and tan Setter 
bitch, Keepsake (California Bell Boy-Peach Blossom) whelped 
August 22, 1902. Owner, breeder L H. Babcock, Handler. 
With 

J. E. Terry's (Sacramento) black, white and tan Setter dog 
Kilgarif (Orion-Mary Lou) whelped July 28, 1901 Owner 
breeder W. B. Coutts, handler. * 

Stockdale Kennols (Bakersfield), white and black Pointer bitch 
Midget (Cuba's Zep-Jingo's Bagpipe) whelped November 1 

1901. Owner, breeder A. S. Carlisle, handler. 

With 

J. A. Peebles, (Seattle) white and orange ticked Setter dog 
Uncle Jimmie Whitestone (Count Whitestone-Sport's Mav- 
belle). J. E Lucas, handler. 

Wm J. Morris' (Los Angeles) white, liver and tioked Pointer 
bitch Faith, (Silver Dick-Tipaway) whelped Nov. 19, 1902 J 
P. Grawl, Waverly, Iowa, breeder Carlisle, handler. 

With 

Rose & Christensen's white, black and tan Setter bitch Belle 
Fontaine (Count Whitestone-Graoie Gladstone) whelped May 

1902. Frank Jague, Humboldt, Iowa, breeder W. B. Coutts 
handler. 

C. H. Shaw's (San Francisco) liver and white Pointer dog Oak 
Knoll (Tick Boy-Tick's Maid), whelped May 25, 1902. Geo. 
Crocker, N. Y., breeder; Carlisle, handler. 

With 

W W Van Arsdale's black, white and tan Setter dog Harry H. 

(Why Not-Sue), whelped February 17, 1901. P. Lorillard, N Y. 

breeder; Babcock, handler. 
Stockdale Kennels' (Bakersfield) liver and white Pointer dog 

Cuba Jr. (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Florida), whelped March 13, 1900. 

Owner, breeder; R. M. Dodge, handler. 

With 

W. W. Van Arsdale's black, white and tan Setter dog MoCloud 
Boy (Tony Boy-Sadie Hopkins), whelped December 25, 1900. 
Owner, breeder; Babcock, handler. 

H. W. Keller's (Santa Monica) orange and white Setter bitch 
Sombra (Llewellin's Drake-Shadow), whelped August 13, 1902 
W. W. Van Arsdale, breeder: W. B. Coutts, handler. 

With 

J. W. Considlne's (Seattle) black, white and tan Setter bitch 
Policy Girl (Dave Earl-Top's Queen) J. E. Lucas, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's black, white and tan Setter dog Count's 
Mark (Ch Count Gladstone IV-Peach Mark), whelped March 4 
U99. Owner, breeder; Babcock, handler. 

With 

Stockdale Kennels' liver and white Pointer dog Glenwood (Ch. 

Cuba of Kenwood-Petronella), whelped January 22, 1903. Owner, 

breeder; Dodge, handler. 
J. H, Schumacher's (Los Angeles) white, black and tan Setter 

bitch Valita, (California Bell Boy-Rod's Lark), whelped April 

20, 1902. W. W. Van Arsdale, breeder; Lucas, handler. 

With 

W. W. Van Arsdale's black and tan Setter dog Avalon (California 
Bell Boy-Peach Blossom), whelped August 2, 1902. Ownor, 
breeder; Babcock, handler. 

Jos. E. Terry's orange and white Setter bitch Ladylike (Orion- 
Terry's Lady), whelped July 25. 1903. Ownor, breeder; W. B. 
Coutts, handler. 

With 

Wm. Dormer's (Oakland) white and tan Setter dog Mariposa 
(Detroi t Joe-Countess Mark), whelped March, 1903. W. W. Van 
Arsdale, breeder; Babcock, handler. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's liver and white Setter dog Jay M. (Colonel 
R. -Spot's Girl), whelped March 29, 1901. Geo. E. Gray, Apple- 
ton, Minn., breeder; Babcock, handler. 

With 

J. W. Flynn's black and white Pointer dog Burbank (Dr. Daniels- 
Senator's Mistress Nell), whelped March 20, 1903. Owner, 
breeder; W. B. Coutts, handler. 

II 

Keopsako with Ladylike. 

Cuba Jr. with Harry H. 

Sombra with Jay M. 

Avalon with Uncle Jimmie Whltestono. 

Kilgarif with Mariposa (In reserve). 

RESULT. 

First, Harry H.; second, Cuba, Jr.; equal third, Ladylike, Jay M. 

Bakersfield, January 13, 1905 -Pacific Coast 
Field Trials Club's twenty second annual trials. 
Champion Stake. Open to all. $10 to start, 50% to 
first winner, 25% to runner up. Cups to both. Four 
starters. Two hour heats. H. L. Betten and W. H. 
Keller, judges. 

W. W. Van Arsdale's (San Francisco) liver and white Pointer 
dog Dr. Daniels (Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II), whelped May 18, 1898. 
Breeder, Dr. Daniels, Cleveland, O.; Babcock, handler. 
With 

Jos. E. Terry's lemon and whito English Setter bitch Lady (Ch 

Count GladstonelV-Peach Mark). W. W. Van Arsdale, breeder; 

W. B. Coutts, handler. 
Stockdalo Kennels' (Bakersfield) liver and white Pointer dog 

Cuba Jr. (Ch. Cuba of Kenwood-Florida), whelped March 13 

1900. Ownor, breeder; Dodge, handler. 

With 

Jos. E. Torry's black, whlto and tan English Settor dog Kilgarif 
(Orion-Mary Lou), whelped July 28, 1901. 
Dr. Daniels, winner; Lady, runner up. 



The Derby prizes were a silver cup, presented by H. 
W. Kellor; a music box, presented by W. W. Richards; 
a clock, presented by George H. Anderson. 

Membership Stake— Silver flask, by W. W. Van 
Arsdale; silver bottle, by C. E. Worden; silver cup, by 
Alex Hamilton. 

All-Age Stake— Decanter, W. S. Tevis; decanter, 



10 



LJanuary 21, 1905 



Western Field; silver cup, J. H Schumacher. 

Champion Stake-Cup donated by W. S Teyis, 
cud bv W. E. Gerber for runner up. These trophies 
are to be won twice, by owner of winner, to entitle per- 
manent ownership. , 

The method of distribution of the prizes in the 
various events, excepting the Championship Stake, 
was by choice, the winning owners selected the 
trophies in the order of precedence by wine. 

Wm. Dormer asked for a price on Mariposa before 
the Derby was run. Mr Van Arsdale offered to take 
$150 for the Setter, the offer was closed by Mr. 
Dormer, who surely became the owner of a high class 
English Setter for an exceecingly small sum. Mr. 
Van Arsdale's liberality in the sale is in keeping with 
his reputation as a thorough sportsman. He knew 
what Mariposa was but concluded to let him go for 
the reason that he had more dogs in his kennels than 
he cared for. 

Jos. E. Terry was so impressed with the enthusiasm 
and brightness of young Fargo Rose that he presented 
him with a corking good Setter, Rival a Derby dog, 
on the field. 

The arrangements carried out by the club officials 
this year won warm encomiums from the sportsmen 
in attendance at the trials. 



The Origin and Development of the Pointer. 

Who has not heard of the Pointer, and where is the 
sportsman that has not gloried in his outline, his 
speed, his nose, his beauty and his intelligence? In 
the northern country to-day, where the sportsman is 
afield, he is the apple of his eye, the most worshipped 
of all the gun dogs. For, like the Spaniel, the Pointer 
s everywhere. England, once the hotbed of the 
good-looking pointing dogs, may at the present 
moment not be able to hold her own in bench Pointers 
with America and Russia, but still she retains the 
working strains that have graced the kennel of gen- 
eration after generation of the Squirearchy of the 
other side. The slow, slobbering Pointers, or dogs 
asked to find partridges to be flown at Falcon in the 
early part of the season, have giveD way to the more 
elegant Pointer— beautifully modelled creature such 
as we ofteD see in the field and in the exhibition ring, 
so writes Fred Freeman Lloyd. 

The evolution of the Pointer from what may be 
. described as the bloodhoundy type to the modern 
English Foxhound kind has taken, perhaps, close on 
one hundred and fifty years. He is essentially, above 
all others, a dog of utility, and as the Pointer has 
always been looked upon as one of the chief helpmates 
of the man who loves to take his pleasure behind a 
well-broken brace of dogs, a pair of barrels and 
straight powder, it stands to reason that that man 
has called in all his ingenuity and all his knowledeg 
of breeding to provide himself with a sporting dog 
that is best adapted for the sport that is provided for 
him. Therefore, in some places in America, where 
the plains are so vast, a very fast and wide-ranging 
Pointer is required — one, too, with 'bird sense." 
Where true ranging, a good nose and staunchness on 
game are to be found embodied in oue single dog, 
there, perhaps, have we found the perfect animal, and 
a retrieving Pointer at that. 

The universality and utility of the Pointer is 
patent. Some of us have shot over him in many 
countries, and strange ones, too. On hot and arid 
continents, such as Africa and Australia, I have found 
him to be able to go a considerable time without 
water. The veldt has been as hard as brick, and the 
Darling Downs of drought-stricken Queensland have 
gaped and cracked in supplication for rain, but the 
Pointers went about their allotted tasks with the en- 
thusiasm of the second season dog at the dawn of the 
first of September in more privileged parts north of 
the equator. 

As in other breeds of dogs, there are all sizes and 
sorts of Pointers. The short-headed, cloddy- 
shouldered and often weak-thighed and cow-hocked 
Pointer has gone by the board. It stands to reason 
that, although the cart-horse can gallop, he cannot 
gallop with the thorough-bred — the clean-necked, 
oblique-shouldered, deep-hammed, live racing ma- 
chine. Half a day of real going will knock up the 
heavy-headed, loose-throated Pointer. He has had 
to give way to the more elegant quantity; but even 
such as he should not be too small. You are likely to 
lose sight of him in any cover of note, and that is not 
as it should be. At the leading shows in the United 
States the Pointer dogs are divided by weights, as 
are the bitches. There are classes for dogs under 55 
pounds, and for dogs 55 pounds and over; for bitches 
under 50 pounds and for bitches 50 pounds and 
over. 

There can be little doubt that English Foxhound 
blood was intioduced into the Pointer, and we are 
told that subsequently the progeny was bred in and 
in. It will be found in Vol. II of Tuplins' Sporting 
Dictionary, published just one hundred years ago, 
that the writer of the Pointer contribution had a deal 
to say about the Foxhound cross. So fast was the 
Pointer of bis day (1803) that in many cases we are 
told that the galloping— nay, coursing qualities — of 
the Foxhound proper were so pronounced that a badly 
broken or ill-mannered Pointer, such as he was then, 
could run inio, and, of course, kill, a leveret three 
parts grown. Now we all know the speed of the hare, 
how she will twist, turn and swerve, using all h6r 
speed, activity and cleverness that often more than 
makes an exhibition of a good greyhound. Without 
the stamina of lepus timidus in the consciousness of 
his prime, it will be admitted that a leveret can travel 



pretty fast, so the Pointers of a century ago must 
have'been fast enough even for our friends in the 

West. 

One hundred and fifty years ago Pointers entirely 
white, or with liver-colored spots, were hardly ever 
seen. There was a strain owned by the then Duke of 
Kingston, and those were black and white. They 
were considered superior to any dogs then in England , 
and at the death of their owner they were sold, and 
brought fabulous prices. There are strains of all 
liver and of all black Pointers in England, America, 
and South Africa today. They are highly prized. 

Certainly, one of the beet Pointers it has ever been 
my good fortune to look over was a liver dog — Bent- 
ley's Nap— the property of E. J. Pullinger, one of 
Johannesburg's (Transvaal) gold kings. Perhaps a 
little short in head, his Nap was nearly all a Pointer 
should be — standing, as he did, on fore legs — as 
straight as corduroy, and these let into nice, sloping 
shoulders that in their turn had afore them a neck 
that was long, well-poised, clean, round and f ree f r om 
hangor leather; his body wasshort, deep and rounded. 
There was the spring of rib and width and keel of 
brisket and frame that gave him heart and lung room. 
Day in and day out Mr. Pullinger's dog would go with 
almost the speed of a Greyhound, and with the deter- 
mination of a devil. Down his back, along his spine, 
was a suspicion of a groove, that ended with his wide 
and muscular loins, the middlepiecethat kept together 
the propelling poweis of his deep, long, muscled and 
sinewed hams and thighs. Travel with me with your 
mind's eye to his well-bent stifles and let-down hocks, 
as free in their movement and as strong withal as the 
hinges on a bank safe. Have we finished with him? 
Nay! Glance for a moment at his cat-like feet, bent, 
strong knuckles, and pads as pliable yet as tough as 
rubber; his stern set on in the right place, somewhat 
thick at the butt, and tapering to the point like an 
otter's poll. In such as he, have we well nigh the 
perfect pointing dog. 

The Pointer is considered a gentleman's dog when 
he is steady to bird, dog and gun. Of course, it is 
not meant "to con vey that such a dog is only fit for 
those sportemen who live and have their being in 
high places — far from such a thought for a millionth 
part of a moment. But the man who goes abroad and 
seeks his pleasure with his gun and his Pointerknows 
fnlly well that a half-broken dog is an abomination. 
The eye delights, the heart throbs with joy, the 
senses tingle with gratification at the sight of a good 
dog at work. He will stand, and stand steadily when 
the wind bears down to him the sought-for scent of 
his game; he will back if the other dog gets the point; 
he will point instantaneously when he sees the other 
pointing; be willnot stir from his point upon the firing 
of any gun in company, provided the game is neither 
sprung nor started, at which he made his original 
point. 

A hundred and twenty or thirty years ago breaking 
a Pointer or Setter to point was looked upon as a 
mysterious business. It can be easily imagined, as 
men were not fools even in those days, that those who 
knew all about it kept the so-called secret to them- 
selves. They would hardly be expected to tell the 
wondering yokel that pointing game was as natural, 
or perhaps we might say, as hereditary to the point- 
ing dog as was hunting and watering to the Spaniel, 
ratting to the Terrier, coursing to the Greyhound, or 
fighting to the fighting dog. Yet so it is, and Pointers 
bred from broken or trained parents are more tractable 
than those whose parents' lives have been spent among 
the somewhat veneered existence of show life, or the 
unspeakable horrors of the city back yard. 

Discipline is required in a Pointer — discipline that 
is not welted into him by the aid of a heavy whip or 
thrice-wicked shod foot. Teach him as a puppy to 
drop to hand when you require him to do so; show 
him game, encourage him to draw on to the birds, 
drop him with studied severity when the birds 3ush, 
never minding about your bag (which might be after 
all, but your own greed), and you will not be far from 
possessing' what every one in the world is after, and 
that is a Pointer that shall be a credit to you and the 
talk of your county . As in the days of the falconer 
and the times of the netter, so must the Pointer 
always remain one of the greatest of blessings at the 
lieck and call of the sportsman afoot, after winged 
and certain kinds of furred game. 



bait and hook so strenuously that the barbed steel 
had to be cut out of the fish's stomach. 

One reason alleged why 6triped bass are so plenti- 
ful at all times in San Antone slough is that the set 
net fishermen, who illegally anchored their nets at the 
mouth of Petaluma creek, have been discouraged by 
several recent seizures of their tackle. 

P. J. Walsh of Black Point, who is a deputy fish 
commissioner, discovered and captured two immense 
nets within the past two months. One of these nets 
was over a mile in length, and held down by a number 
of heavy fluked mud anchors; the other was about 
half a mile in length. The value of the seized nets 
was nearly $1,000. The confiscated fishing gear was 
taken to Petaluma to await the claim of owners who 
were willing to plead guilty and pay the usual fine for 
fish law violations of this character. The largest net 
taken weighed cown a four-ton salmon boat until the 
gunwales were about eight inches above the water's 
surface. 

After the nets were set out, the fishermen, to avoid 
observation, would anchor their boat off in the bay a 
mile a way. This trick was for the purpose of evad- 
ing arrest by being caught in the act of illegal net 
fishing. The nets were so placed as to leave the chan- 
nel open for the passage up and down the creek of tho 
steamer and sailing craft. 

The fishermen had been in the practice of setting 
out the nets in the evening on a flood tide. In this 
manner fish going up stream were captured, and on 
the out-going ebb bass coming down with the tide 
would find their way to the bay barred by the deadly 
set net, thus the poachers made a double haul of 
striped bass. The time for gathering of the spoils 
was during low tide, when the net was lying, with its 
finny victims enmeshed, high and dry on the long 
stretch of mud fiat. The fishermen have a board con- 
trivance, with a barrel or large box setting upon it, 
similar in devise to the "clamboard" used by Chinese 
clam diggers. The dead wagon is propelled rapidly 
over the slippery mud alongside the serpentine length 
of the collapsed net, from which neither ducks nor 
fish can escape. The tish caught are then disengaged 
from the gill meshes. Any of the large bass that 
show signs of life are knocked on the head with a 
hammer, for handling a ten or fifteen pound bass in 
sticky, knee deep blue mud is not a safe adventure, 
for these fish are armed with spiny dorsal and pectoral 
fins that can make cruel wounds in hands that are 
careless, or, for that matter, the spines will easily 
pierce through a gum boot. 



Striped Bass Notes. 

Devotees of striped bass fishing have found most of 
the nearby favorite salt-water fishing resorts de- 
cidedly non-productive recently, with the agreeable 
exception of San Antone slough. On this prolific bass 
confluent of Petaiuma creek results have been most 
encouraging — in fact, a day on this water is found to 
be worth the trip to Burdells. On the 8th inst, about 
thirty fishermen were out in boats, tempting the wary 
fish with succulent clams. 

One of the best catches made during last week was 
on Thursday, when A. M. Cumming landed a dozen 
fish, four of the bass weighing over fity pounds. 
Among the other and successful rodsters out on that 
day were Frank Marcus, Mr. Johnson and A. S. 
Church, whose largest bass weighed 16J pounds. 

The weather was extremely cold on Thursday, a 
week ago, which condition of temperature, it was be- 
lieved, had a corresponding effect on the fish, instead 
of taking the baits with a nibble or two followed by a 
rush, the fish seemed to cautiously mouth the bait 
before quietly engorging it, this in a manner not made 
apparent to the angler by the usual signals from be- 
low. After a fish would swallow the bait it moved 
away very slowly, and a number of fish were very 
securely hooked before the angler was aware of his 
luck. Several bass caught were found to have taken 



Steelhead Angling Notes. 

The rod-wellding fraternity of this city, those of 
them that visited Point Reyes up to Friday of last 
week, had excellent sport with the fresh run of big 
9teelhead trout that recently swam in from the ocean 
waters and took up temporary position in the tide 
water pools of Paper Mill creek awaiting opportunity 
for a trip up stream to spawn. This chance came 
with the recent rainfall that raised the stream and 
stopped temporarily further sport for the anglers. 

The sport commanced about a week previous, when 
a number of nice-sized fish were taken. Among the 
catch was a nine-pounder landed by Frank Dolliver. 
On Sunday last "Del" Cooper, J. M. Thomson, James 
Lynch, "Pop" Carroll, Bert Spring, Joseph Pincus 
"Abe" Banker and Frank Rompf found the stream 
conditions almost ideal for steelhead angling. Cooper 
hooked a big trout on a spoon Tho fish, however, 
broke loose after a hard struggle. The fisherman 
then rigged up with bait and had another unavailable 
argument with the same fish. Bert Spring prospected 
the pool and finally landed the battling trout, which 
scaled nearly ten pounds and was found to be a female 
fish full of roe. Carroll hooked and landed a twelve 
pounder, which proved to be a "spent" fish. Another 
angler caught an eight-pound "buck" trout near the 
bridge. 

Dolliver and Banker fished the "White House" 
pool on the following Monday afternoon. Two mon- 
ster trout cleaned out their tackle in short order. A 
couple of nice fish were then landed, after which ex- 
perience the two anglers were once more robbed of 
their running gear, Dolliver breaking a stout green- 
heart rod as well. 

On Tuesday S. A. Wells, Bert Spring and Clarence 
Ashlin tried the stream. Notwithstanding that most 
of the fish previously noticed in the pools bad evi- 
dently gone out with the tide, Spring landed a ten 
pound fish after a grand fight. Wells shortly after- 
ward succeeded in bringing a fourteen pounder to 
gaff. This fish was taken on a No. 4 brass Wilson 
spoon. Ashin, although he had several strikes, was 
unlucky and failed to connect. 

John Butler, Charles Linn and son, John Schloen, 
Mr. Gordon and Mr. Dougal landed several fish on 
Thursday. Besides the large fish above mentioned, a 
considerable number of smaller fish were taken. 

Despite the threatened storm which sent the fisher- 
men home on Friday last week, a number of the 
"regulars" were at tho Point last Sunday. 

Fishing for steelhead will be over on February 1. 
A close season will then prevail until April 1. It is 
lawful now to catch steelhead in tide waters only, 
despite the statutory permission to fish for the 
present in tide water, many violations of the law have 
been reported as taking place in the Paper Mill above 
the tide water limit by parties who spear fish. This 
unsportsmanlike method is claimed to bo one of annual 
recurrence in that section. 

The Russian river near Duncans is reported to be 
still too high and muddy for good fishing. This re- 
sort is a favorite one with many anglers. If there is 
a chance for any sport before the close season prevails 
a number of local anglers propose to give the stream 
a final test. 



January 21, 1905] 



THE FARM. 



New Association Organized. 



The California Live Stock Sanitary 
Association, an organization composed 
of the different official veterinarians 
throughout the State, and whose object 
is to have passed bills to aid the cattle- 
growers of the State, came into existence 
Monday afternoon at the Palace Hotel. 
Sixteen veterinarians, representing coun- 
ties from every section of the State, were 
present beside a number of stock men, 
who were not eligible to membership, but 
who made talks and offered advice. 

The meeting was called to order by 
Charles Keane, who is responsible for the 
existence of the association, and who 
acted as chairman pro tem. until C. L. 
McGowan, city veterinarian for Sacra- 
mento, was elected president The offices 
of secretary and treasurer were comb ned 



the association are to oe $2 a year. After 
the by-laws have been adopted the com- 
mittee was empowered to frame a consti- 
tution and to present it at the next meet- 
ing. 

After the association had been formally 
organized Charles Keane read a bill which 
is to be presented at the present session 
of the Legislature. The bill provides that 
the Board of Supervisors in all counties 
be empowered to appoint county veteri- 
narians, at a salary to be determined by 
the Board of Supervisors. In speaking of 
the bill Keane said: "It is vital for the 
health of any community that a regular 
veterinarian be appointed, with power to 
condemn diseased ariimals, especially 
milch cows, one of the greatest causes for 
the spread of tuberculosis. In many of 
the counties this office does not exist, and 
it is for this purpose that the present bill 
is offered." Keane said that Senator 
Lynch of San Luis Obispo county had 
promised to father the bill. 

The meeting closed with the reading 
and discussion of two papers, one on 
"Glanders," by Dr. T. Carpenter of Ala- 




The Percheron Stallion "Fresno" 



into one and were given to Keane. A 
committee of five to arrange the constitu- 
tion and bylaws for the organization was 
elected as follows: The president, the 
secretary, Dr. R. A. Archibald of Oak- 
land, Dr. George Baker of San Francisco 
and Dr. F M Sawyer of Bakersfield. 

After the committee was elected a 
recess of ten minutes was taken and a set 
of by-laws was drafted. The by-laws 
stated that the meetings are to take place 
on the second Tuesday in December of 
each year; that the officers are to be 
elected for one year and that the dues of 



meda and the other on "Tuberculosis," 
by Dr. George S. Baker, Federal veteri- 
narian for the port of San Francisco. 



It does no harm to cover milk after it 
is cool, warm milk should be left un- 
covered until it has cooled to at least 50 
degrees. 



It seems impossible to obtain milk ab 
solutely free from bacteria This is 
probably right, as the presence of the 
bacteria causes it to clabber and the 
cream to rise. 




Anticipation 



The Salivary Cure. 



"Yourhorseis off his feed a little," 
said the veterinary surgeon. "Give him, 
for a week or two, his hay and oats on 
the ground instead of from a stall. That 
will put him on his feet, I think." 

"1 shall follow your advice, sir," said 
the owner of the horse "but at the 
same time I must admit that I fall to see 
the logic of it. " 

"The logic of my ad vice is clear, " the 
surgeon asserted. "The natural way for 
a horse to eat is off the ground, is it not? 
The liorse is a grazing animal; the wild 
horse, going from pasture to pasture, ate 
from the ground only and always. 

"It follows that the modern horse i s 
fitted to eat best from the ground. It is 
only when eating with the head lowered 
in this manner that the animal's saliva 
flows as freely as it should. Let your 
horse eat from the ground awhile — give 
him what we may call the salivary 
nature cure — and I guarantee that in a 
week he will be well again." — Exchange. 



Secret ot Danish Butter Making. 



The Danes love their cows and give 
them every comfort; and the cows, not 
to be outdone in devotion, do their very 
best. All the stables I visited were fire- 
proof, had concrete floors, and there 
was water so arranged that everything 
could be washed. 

Each stall had a tablet with the name 
of the cow, date of birth, pedigree, etc. 
There was also a slate on which a daily 
record was kept. 

If a cow is sick she is at once separ- 
ated from the other animals and taken 
to the hospital. It is a crime in Den- 
mark to use or sell milk from a sick cow. 

The milking is done by women who 



are not allowed to wear sleeves below the 
elbow. They wear white linen caps and 
aprons, and must not only wash the bag 
of the cow, but also wash their own 
hands before milking, each time. 

Everything f e d the cow is prepared 
with great care— the quality and quan- 
tity is known, as nearly as possible. In 
the pastures every weed is pulled and 
the cow is not permitted to eat anything 
that will in any way taint the milk. 

The cream is carefully pasteurized. 

In short, the secret of Danish butter- 
making is perfect cleanliness and eterna 
vigilance, but the result is a product 
that will go through the tropics or the 
circumpolar region and come out stand- 
ing up. — C. A. Harrison in Farm Jour- 
nal. 

When the cream is perfectly ripened 
before churning the churn gets out 
more of the fats and the buttermilk 
carries away less. 

Although Jerseys are disposed to breed 
very young, some prefer that they should 
not come fresh until two or two and a 
half years old. 

o 

It is sometimes difficult to know just 
where to lay the responsibility of the 
dirt in the milk pail. It must come from 
the body of the cow or the milker. 
o 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the 
feet. 



FOR SALE. 

Kate McKinney ^ E T m M ™ E b Y y 

Nutwood, dam of Ole 2:11, Koblet 2:12, Tletam 2:19, 
Maud Fowler 2:21% (dam of Sonoma GlrlJ.Mc- 
Pherson (trial) 2:14 and others. Eveline never 
threw a foal that was not. a trotter. Kate Mc- 
Kinney is a perfect bay, absolutely sound, 5 years 
old and only partly broken, but small. Price 
reasonable. Apply to THOS. BONNER & CO., 
1499 Market St., San Francisco. 




TuEf ■ .^Ifc'-iMx* A H'rffii Tar MB * ' 'Mfc I'tT/^ll HI H - 

A California Winter Pasture 



12 



[January 21, UK 5 



Profitable Milk Production. 



When the dairy doctors disagree about 
the amount of digestable protein needed 
to form a perfect milk ration, then the 
farmers must experiment and decide for 
themselves. The amount of protein 
which the cl.emiat finds in a quart of 
milk may not be in the exact proportion 
required for the cow's perfect ration to 
produce the largest quantity of milk at 
the smallest coast of feed. The cow has 
constantly some needs of her own to sup- 
port her animal system and repair the 
wastes of her body as well as to provide 
milk which nature intended for the 
calf. 

John Gould truly says: "The whole 
thing hinges, not on what the tables 6ay, 
but on the feeder's judgment, so that the 
most milk can be obtained at the least 
cost." That is the whole truth in a nut- 
shell, and should be framed under glass 
and hung up in the cow stable.l 

Oats, because they are such a handy 
and healthy grain to feed horses, always 
command a higher price, relatively, than 
any other grain fed to stock. Mr. Gould 
is aware of this, but says, "I do not hesi- 
tate to make the (cow's) ration one-fourth 
oats, whatever the cost." The writer has 
fed cows on corn, rye, oats and buckwheat 
ground together in equal quantities by 
weight, and then fed the same cows an 
equal quantity of other ground grains 
with the oats left out, and no apprecia- 
ble difference in the milk yield was ap- 
parent. 

A dairyman in Orange county, New 
York, who kept over forty cows, told me 
he fed large quantities of brewer's grains; 
that they produced a large flow of milk; 
but he rather thought the milk thin, and 
did not contain much cream. However 
he was not sure of this, as he sold all his 
milk in New York, and bought his butter. 
Wheat bran alone is a poor cowfeed, and 
cows will refuse it after eating a few 
messes. I have found wheat bran, and 
corn meal, mixed in equal quantities by 
weight, to be a good milk producer, 
whether it be a well balanced ration or 
not. Cornmeal is supposed to be too 
fattening for cows in milk, but the gen- 
erous giver, or deep milker, ought to have 
some fattening food to prevent her from 
losing flesh during the period of greatest 
flow. 

f Prof. E. W. Stewart contended all his 
life that there was no way by which so 
much of the value of grain could be 
obtained as by grinding it fine, and mix- 
ing it thoroughly with cut hay, stalks of 
straw, moistened with water to make the 
meal stick. This way of feeding makes 
more labor, but the extra labor pays, and 
the best results in any kind of business 
cannot be obtained without painstaking 
and more labor. Better farming pays. 
The writer has tried his cattle with the 



cut feed many times, and is convinced 
that Professor Stewart's contention is 
true. Two winters ago, owing to the 
scarcity of hay, our cows, young cattle 
I and horses were kept almost entirely on 
I cut straw and meal, with which they were 
I so we'l satisfied that they would eat little 
[ hay when given to them. The cows never 
I gave more milk on the same quantity of 
grain fed alone. There is nothing won- 
derful about this. Reason and experi- 
ment agree. When the particles of meal 
are stuck fast to the pieces of straw they 
form a mass that nearly fills the stomach, 
so that each particle of meal has a chance 
to come in contact with the absorbent 
vessels, and the greatest portion of the 
nutriment is appropriated. On the other 
hand, when, say, five quarts of meal are 
fed alone, it does not become to well dif- 
fused throughout the stomach, is apt to 
remain in a body, or several bodies, and 
much of it passes away without having 
its valuable properties extracted and re- 
tained. 

It does not pay to feed cows all the 
grain they will eat without becoming 
clogtred, any more than it pays a man to 
overload his stomach with rich food. 
When dairy products are dear and grain 
cheap, it will do to be liberal with the 
cows, but not to encourage gluttony. Of 
course, some cows will endure and re- 
spond to high feeding better than others, 
but I have found that four quarts of good 
meal, fed twice a day to each cow, is 
about as much as can be profitably fed. 

The question whether cows should have 
their rations increased to prevent shrink- 
age depends on the kind of feed they 
have been supplied with, and the size of 
the ration. If the ration has been meagre, 
then an increase would no doubt, increase 
the flow, or prevent shrinkage, and prob- 
ably be profitable. The ration that has 
been found to produce the most milk at. 
the least cost should be the standard, 
just as bread and butter are the standard 
at the farmer's table ; but cows, like hu- 
man beings, are fond of an occasional 
change in their diet, and will welcome 
some side dishes, relishes and dessertei 
and pay for the favor in something more 
tangible than gratitude. 

I have practiced winter dairying, and 
agree that the best time to have cows 
calve is in October or November. Hairy 
products are always the highest in winter. 
The cows must be kept well a lyhow, and 
if fresh, will pay for the extra grain feed 
required and leave a good profit besides. 
Furthermore, cows that calve in the fall 
will increase their milk when they come 
to grass, and their milk season is consid- 
erably extended.— J. W. Ingham, in 
Tribune Farmer. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons^ Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and otber bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., it is invaluable. 

Every bottle of Caustic Balsam sold is 
Warranted to srive satisfaction. Prire $1 50 
per bottle. Sold by dru(T(rists, or sent by ex- 
press, charsres paid, with full directions for 
its use. MTSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



A New Sheep Danger. 



The annual report of the Bureau of 
Animal Industry, now going through the 
government print mill, contains a note on 
the bladder worm in sheep. During a 
recent trip to Montana by the acting 
zoologist of this Bureau, specimens of a 
bladder worm were obtained from the 
brains of a sheep which seems to be 
identical with the gid bladder worm 
Coenurus cerebrelis, of Europe, and it 
produced similar symptoms. This bladder 
worm, the adult stage of which (Taenia 
coenurus) lives in the intestines of dogs, 
is very common in the Old World, and is 
one of the most dangerous and destructive 
parasites with which sheep may be 
affected. A few years ago it was said 
that 1,000,000 sheep die from it annually 
in France, and the losses in Germany 
have been put at 15 per 1000 in the first 
year of life, 5 in the second year, 2 in the 
third year, and 1 in the fourth. In Eng- 
land, although the parasite seems to be 
less common than formerly, the mortality 
at times in some flocks is as high as 35 
per cent. The on'y practical treatment 
lies in prevention, which consists prin- 
cipally in keeping dogs free from tape- 
worms by frequent dosings and by pre- 
venting them from eating the uncooked 
brain or spinal cord of infected Bheep. 



Until the present time no well established 
cases have been reported from the United 
States, which is rather remarkable in the 
face of numerous importations from 
Europe both of sheep and dogs, some of 
which must certainly have been infected. 
Although the conditions existing in this 
country are perhaps unfavorable to the 
parasite, so that it has been unable to 
gain a foothold, and although so far it 
may have caused little damage, its pres- 
ence here is, nevertheless, a constant 
menace ; and there is danger that, if un- 
checked, it will in the future become as 
serious a pest in the United States as it is 
in Europe. It is therefore important that 
a careful investigation of this parasite be 
made in this country, and that thorough 
measures be taken to prevent its dis- 
semination. — Texas Farmer. 



No country and no product is exempt 
from its off-season. As a rule, a kind 
Providence smiles, opens His hand and 
supplies the want of every living thing, 
and such is the diversity of crop that 
everything is "off. " 



If possible every farm should have a 
milk house in which the milk can be 
kept, the churning done, the milk ves- 
sels kept, and plenty of water with 
which to cool the milk and wash the 
vessels. 

o 

The tail is an indication of breed. A 
short, heavy tail at the top and tapering 
to a small brush does not indicate a pure 
bred. But a long, heavy tail with a 
large brush indicates a good dairy type. 
o 

Tho farmer is fortunate who has a 
wood lot. He can spend much of his 
time there, when little else can be done. 
It will pay to have leaf mould and 
spread it on the ground anywhere. 

Milk may be cooled by pouring from 
one vessel to another, by setting in cold 
water or placing on Ice. The more rap- 
idly it is cooled the more cream rises. 
o 

A new remedy for the kicking cow is 
suggested. Tie her foot from above so 
it will barely touch the floor. 



St. Louis Fair 
Association 

STAKE EVENTS 1905, 1906. 

ENTRIES CLOSE FEBRUARY I, I905. 

Meeting- from June 3rd to September 2nd. 
STAKES FOR 1905. 

INhCGUKAL HANDICAP $2010 Added. Entry fee 310. A handicap for three-year- 
June 3rd. oldsand upwards One JUUe 

THE DEBUTANTE $1500 Added. Entry fee$I0. Eor two-year-old Allies. .. . 

June 10th. Nine-Sixteenths Mile 

THE KINDERGARTEN $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year-old colls and 

June 24th. geldings I ive-Elghths Mile 

MISS VALLEY SELLING $1500 Added. Entry lee $10. For three-year-olds and up- 

July 1st. wards One Mile 

INDEPENDENCE HANDICAP. . . .120110 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-vear-pMs and up-.. 

July 4th. wards One and Three.«fxte«»Oui Mile* 

JR. CHAMPIONSHIP $2000 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year olds. .. 

July 8th ^Three-Fourths Mile 

CLUB MEMBERS HANDICAP. .. .$3000 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

July 15lh. upwards One and Onr-Ouarter Miles 

MID-. SUMMER HANDICAP $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and up- 

July 22nd. wards One Mile and Seventy Tarda 

NATIVE NURSERY $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year-olds 

July 39th. Five-Eighths Mi e 

COUNTRY CLUB HANDICAP $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

August 5th upwards Three- Fcurths Mile 

GASCONADE HELLING $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

August 12th. upwards One and One-Sixteenth Miles 

LEMP HANDICAP $!500Added. Entryfee$IO. For two-year-olds 

August 19th Three-Fourths Mile 

AUGUST SELLING $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year olds and 

August 26th. upwards Three- Fourths Mile 

SEPTEMBER SELLING $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year olds and 

September 2nd. upwards One Mile 

The $50,000 St. Louis Handicap for 1906. f^!n^^^.\^ 

stakes for three-year olds and upward In 1906 (foals of 1903 and preceeaing years) The St. Louts 
Fair Association guaranteees the gross value to be $.Vi,000, of which $6000 to second and $2000 to third, 
and the fourth to save Its stake. Liabilties as follows: Two-year-olds at time of entry by sub- 
scription of $10 each, February 1, 1905; $15 additional if not declared by May 1, 1905; $50 additional if 
not declared by July 1, 1905: $75 additional if not declared by October 1, 1905; $100 additional if not 
declared by February 1, 1906: $250 additional to start Three year-olds and upward at time of entry 
by subscription of $20 each, February 1. 1905; $30 additional if not declared by May I. 1905; $75 addi- 
tional if not declared by July 1. 1905: $100 additional if not declared by October 1, 1905; $115 additional 
if not declared by February 1. 1906; $250 additional to start. 

Thestakes to be re-opened February 1, 1906, and entries accepted on that date, upon payment of 
$750; $250 additional to start. Weights to be published April 15, 1906. A winner, after publication of 
weights, of $1500 twice, or $2500once, penalized 6 lbs.; of $2500 twice, or $1000 once, 9 lbs; of $4000 
twice, or $7000 once 12 lbs ; if handicapped at 112 lbs. or over, these penalties shall be reduced by one- 
third; at 120 lbs. or over, by two-thirds; at 130 lbs or over there shall be no penalty. In the case of 
three-year-olds, penalties shall not cause the weight to exceed 115 lbs. One Mile and a Quarter 

For further information and entry blanks address 

JOHN HACHMEISTER, Sec'y, St. Louis, Mo. 




Scores of Letters to ) g d f Q . flnd Book|et 
Confirm and Convince ^ F 

Absolute and overwhelming evidence and certainties as to the marvelous and 
unfailing power of "3AVE-THE-HORSE" on every kind and condition of oases. 

"SAVE-THE-HORSE" is indicated for any enlargement caused by an Injury 
which leaves a thickened condition of tho tissues or skin. 

• 'SAVE-THE-HORSE" Permanently Cures Hone and Hog Spavin, 
Thoroughpin, Ringbone (except low ringbone), Curb. Splint, Capped Hock, 
Wlndpuff, shoe Boll. Weak and Sprained Tendons and All Lameness. 
Apply in all extremes of weather. Cures without scar or loss of hair. Horses may 
work as usual 

•B oo per bottle. Written guarantee with every bottle. Need of second bot- 
tle improbable, except In rarest cases. $5 00, at druggists and dealers or sent 
express by 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Binghampton. N. Y. 

(Formerly TROY, N. T.) 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 




January 21, 1905J 



One great reason for poor crops is the 
lack of preparation of the seed bed. 
Gardens bear larger crops in proportion 
than fields. The season is that the soil 
is carefully pulverized and ' the crop 
more thoroughly cultivated. Every 
field should be like a garden. 

o 

Stumps may be easily burned out by 
turning a sheet-iron casing over them, 
in such a shape that it will create a 
draft. Unless it splits too hard, consid- 
erable mav be taken off the sides with a 
maul and wedge. 

o 

There is at least one good advantage 
in keeping cows, and that is if the milk 
cannot be turned into butter or cheese 
profitably, it can in nearly all cases be 
fed to pigs and calves with profit. 
o 

Dairy cows have the ability to make 
pretty good milk when drinking pretty 
bad water. They would drink more 
water and make more arid-better milk if 
they had better water to drink. Try it. 



Tell 



Eastern 
Friends 

of the low rates 
which will be made to 

California 

March 1 to May 15, 1905 

$50 from NEW YORK 
$33 from CHICAGO 
$32 from ST. PAUL 
$25 from KANSAS CITY 

Similar rates from other points. 
Deposit cost of ticket with 
agent here, and ticket will be 
furnished passenger in the 
East. Tell your friends that 
now's the time to come cheaply 
if they buy their tickets via 

Southern Pacific 

ASK FOR PARTICULARS 

San Francisco Office 
613 Market Street 



Racing! Racing 




New California Jockey CI 
OAKLAND TRACK 

COMMENCING SATURDAY, NOV. 12 

Racing Every Week Boy 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

THE LISSAK HANDICAP 

$2000 ADDED 

To be Run SATURDAY, January 21. 

BACKS START AT 2:15 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, a% 12,12 30,1, 
1:30 or 2. 

Returning, trains leave the track at 4:10 and 
4:45 p. m., and Immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



13 



Team For Sale. 

A FINK TEAM OF YOUNG COLTS-STAL- 
hons-byagood son of Director. One 3 and 
one 4 years old. Well matched and well broken, 
gentle and drive well together. Good size, fine 
individuals dark brown in color. Address 
HENRY KLEMP, 
2917 G St., Sacramento. Cal. 



A 



GOOD JACK FOR SALE. 

FIRST-CLASS FOUR-YEAR-OLD JACK, 
fine individual and sure foal getter Address 
HENRY KLEMP, 
£917 G St., Sacramento, Cal. 



QPPORTUNITY OFFERED FOR AN IN- 
vestment of from S3000 to $5000, on which a 
profit of at least 10 per cent can be made within 
three months. Full particulars given on applica- 
tion. This is a legitimate proposition, and one 
that will bear the closest Investigation. Address 
' OPPORTUNITY," Breeder and Sportsman 
Office, San Francisco, Cal. 



TROTTER OR PACER WANTED 

T WANT A GOOD-LOOKING INDIVIDUAL 
* for a roadster, one that can show a good mile 
in matinee race». If any horseman has one that 
is not fast enougfl for racing purposes, but will 
make a good roadster, communicate with under- 
signed. Must be a good one and price must be 
right. JNO. T. SKELTON, 

1017 Second St , Sacramento. 



TROTTERS WANTED. 

f)NE HIGH-CLASS GREEN TROTTER. 
w Only a first-class prospect and a fine individ- 
ual will be considered. 

Also a trotter with a record; one that can win 
in the fast classes this year. These horses are 
for the circuit of 1905 and must be good cnes, and 
prices must be right Mares preferred. 

Address J W. ZIBBLE & SON, 

672 Eleventh Ave , San Francisco, Cal. 

Telephone: West 259. 



WANTED TO LEASE. 



A 



McKINNEY STALLION FOR PUBLIC 
use, on shares or otherwise. Must be a pure 
gaited trotter and out of a gcod individual mare. 
This is a rare opportunity for a horse of merit to 
make a reputation. Address M. L. L., in care of 
Breeder and Sportsman. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 in One" 
on your razor strop till 
leather becomes soft and Ijjj 
pliable ; draw razor blade j i 
, between thumb and finder If L 
moistened with "i in One"; iJJ 
f £ then strop. The razor cuts '/ 
* 5 times as easy and clean; "* 

holds the edge longer. "A 
v Razor Saver for Every 
fcC^' Shaver" which gives the 
scientific reasons, and ai 
■generous trial bottle scnt\ 
f. free. Write to-day. 
(*- W. COLE CO. 
128 Washington life Bldg^ 
New York. 



Good Ones For Sale. 

I HAVE NOT THE TIME NEEDED TO 
devote to my horses, I am offering the entire 
lot for sale, consisting of 

Paltie WfllfRiPitl Syears.by Waldstein; 
raiuc rvuiUMCIH, dam PattieP. by Rich- 
mont. She is heavy in foal to Nushagak and Is 
nominated in the Pacific Breedeis Futurity 
Stakes No. 5, J7000 guaranteed. She is a fine 
mare of excellent breeding and her foal should 
be a great prospect 

PriflfP I yearling bv Prince Ansel; dam 
iniivv. u., PattleP. U entered in Breeders 
Futurity Stakes No. 4 and payments made to 
dale. He Is a fine, large colt and a good prospect. 

TtlYV By Gold Rose; dam by Berger. She is 
iiia.j. a half sister t0 Advocatrix and is 
heavy in foal to a good son of Stam B and Is also 
nominated in Breeders Futurity Stakes 
HatflP I 5 vears old; by Gold Rose; dam 
namv l,. byDon . is a half sister to Hattie 
B. 2:20i4 by Alex Button. Is also heavy in foal 
to a son of Stam B. 

One Two=Year=01d. Me p atusi dam 
One Five=Year=Old. ETwiS^l 

dam by Whlppleton. 

The above are all well broken, good individ- 
uals and fine drivers. 
Send all communications to 

GEO. H. LENT, 
Isleton, Sacramento River, Cal 



FOR SALE 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14 1-4 

TS A HANDSOME BLOOD BAY, WITH STAR 
J- in his forehead and one white foot. Stands 16 
hands and 1 inch; weighs 1250 lb9. Individually 
he is a horse of grand finish and plenty of sub- 
stance. Has a fine disposition, strong shoulders, 
stout back, very strong loins and stifles, strong 
bone, with good feet and legs He is sired by the 
great McKinney 2:11^ His dam, Lady Washing- 
ton 2:35. had 5 colts— Geo. W. McKinney 2:!4J4, 
El Molina 2.20. Washington McKinney (trial 
2:2214)— was by Whipple, No. 8951; grandam Lady 
Mayberry, dam of Dubec 2:16 and others. 

Horse is now at Hemet, Cal. For particulars 
address W. F. WHITTIER, 

20 Fremont St , San Francisco, Cal. 
Or F. H. HOLLOWAY, Hemet, Cal. 



McKINNEY FILLY FOR SALE. 

A TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY SIRED BY Mc- 
Kinney; dam is a half-sister of Grace Kaiser 
(the dam of Coney 2:02, McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 
2:21, Stipulator 2:11 and four others better than 
30>. being sired by Kaiser, he by Geo. Wilkes. 
This filly is now at the track, and with two 
months' work shows quarters in 35 seconds. 

W H. YOUNG, 
337 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



| McMURRAY | 




And LOW PRICES. 



McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 
O-Address, for printed matter and prices, 

W. J. KENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



FOR SALE. 

A HANDSOME 4-YEAR-OLD BAY FILLY; 

pacer: stands 16. 2^ hands; sired by McKin- 
ney, dam Mission Bell by St. Nicholas. Full sis- 
ter to Mechanic. A smooth gaited filly, goes 
without straps or boots, and with less than a 
month's handling has paced a half in 1:11. Is sure 
to make a fast pacer. Address or apply to JOHN 
ROWAN, 1347 East South Street, Stockton, Cal. 



STOCK FARM FOR SALE. 

TjilNE STOCK FARM, HIGHLY IMPROVED. 
r in choice location in California, for sale. 
Address Breeder and Sportsman. 



COMPRESSED PURE SALT 

i^BRICHS 
J B lfrfORALL STOCK 

jhv healthful 
JbHHconvenient 
BmSm ECONOMICAL 

W have the approval 
Mm of large srocA 
^^mi owners everywhere 
Ask your dealer, or send 
for free booklet to 

Mlf10NTSlABlE5lJPPLYC0 Bro ^ lyn 



Wanted to Train 

y^FTER FEBRUARY 15th I WILL BE Lo- 
cated at the San Jose Race Track, and will 
take a few more horses to train and, If dosired, 
will campaign them next season. 
Present address: JACK CURRY, 

2605 Point Lobos Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Quinns Ointment 



Will Make A Horse Over; 

will pu t sound legs under him and 

v. ill save, him from the cheap hawker and trader It is the 
standard cure for Spavins, Curbs, Splints, Windpuffa and all 
the various lumps and bunches of like kind. Kei p it always on 
hand and you will be prepared when trouble comes. Leading 
horsemen everywhere know it and use it. 

Mr. n. FI. Clark, Freilnnla. N. Y.. writes; "The bottle of 
Qutnn's oinimont buruhAsed from you about two years uko 
it-moved ft curb mid thorough pin una did it lor good. My 
horte'a leg t . as smooth as ever.'* 

Price $1.00 per bottle. Sold by nil druggists or sent by mail' 
Write for circulars, testimonials, etc. 

W.B. BODY & COMPANY, WHITEHALL, N. 



ALL FOR SALE. 

uf^^J^ KKS 2:18 ""ee-year-old stal- 

Br^?o A N^wood e -^rke s d br °° dmare by Falrose " 
d.dSng W pVo^e r c t ldallyby Fa,r0Se - 

FAF R(,SP ? ,o WD ' Rosalln and Ardls 
of^ me c^o? rnarlf ^ ° D th ' S C ° a8t ° ut 
„ C " A , S V MARVIN, stallion, fine individual 
S™ 11 ''^ an <J a beautiful trotter. lntUvlduaI ' 

ge?din e C?n ft' 6 *' large ' kind aDd "eautiful 
Pf NRnst o'?P a 1 uarter 'i 30 seconds. 
PENROSE 2:18^, gelding, grandest gentle- 
man's road horse on this Coast; he is perfect on 
inevery way and can step in 2:10 when in condi 

Also sulkies, oarts. and horse goods For breed- 
ing and further particulars address 

W. MASTIN, 2228 H St., Sacramento. 



STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

Dictator Wilkes. S . 0D 01 the e reat Dicta - 

mi]w . , °' tor and Manola by Geo 

Br nkeVh^n d dam *ft great broodmare Lille 
Urlnker by Drennon. DICTATOR WILKES is a 

?ormatlo y n ^ V th ^ ! ty le aDd «oell«t con* 
lormatlon He stands 15 3 and weighs 1100 Was 

y a ™^ 

terl a°nd M p a n c r e r e s. S - *"* a °^™ 

Temescal. s ,T ot p . al £ Alt ° and Teiie 

, » (dam of Truman 212 and twn 

?s aTandsn^ HS V b * G ™- Benton TEMESCAL 
is a handsome chestnut, stands 16 2 weighs 1210 

Style 8 & C S leDi Imposition and size and 
fllTv n„< „, ™ of his get has ever be en worked, a 
Ally out of a Dexter Prince mare, and she shows 
much speed and great promise. 
For prices and further particulars address 
„„ Wo „ W. A. SHIPPEE, 

J»ga eow Nelson, Butte Co, Cal. 

Two Prince Airlie Stallions For Sale. 

MILBRAE 2:16 1-2 b y Prince Airlle 28045 by 
Fred Knhi o-rmy „ G !? y Wilk es 2:15tf, sire of 
2-08V- S /j H V ,da 2:U8 ' /2 ' Seymour Wilkes 
•i.UB'/j, 1st dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 free 2-2<i\ 
roZ°li2 ha ? „ Ba) dwin2:17* , Viilacy 2 HH, Fa b 
Perln \^ dam ,?L JaDice2n8l ^ : » dam Jean 
frZr,ili b - 7 ? ignaI 3327 ' MILBRAE has been in 
' r . % , D i? g , J ^ s ' ° ne ./ear. getting a trotting record 

?er ln ^l ( i 8 Tb t ' 3) - Wlth flrSt half lD 1:05 a <3 uar " 
lerin.di ^ This is no measure of his speed. He 

y earl old. ° WD ' ' 6 bandS ' weighs 1200 P° unds . « 
WENLO BOY 37401 by Prince Airlie 28045 by 
ri» m a<~„ ,^ ^ , „ Gu y Wilkes 2:15M: 1st 
bv S?ilaf ^27 e w- U f H '° 98 ' grandam Lady Signal 
t^t.lf f 2 3 i, 7 ,-, Wlth ver y iil «'e work he has 
trotted in 2:29%, Quarters in :35. He is a brown 
with white pasterns, 16.1 hands, weighs about 
1170, and 5 years old. 

For further information apply to 
P. H. McEV OY, Menlo Park Cal 

FOR SALE. 

Black Mare, 7 years old, 16 hands high, by 
McKinney 2:11*, dam by Antevolo 2:19; second 
dam Fontana (dam of Silas Skinner 2:17 and 
Flora Belle 2:23) bvAlmont33; third dam Fanny 
Williams (dam of Bay Chieftain 228) by Alexan- 
der s Abdallah. She has trotted miles in 2-24 
Also her 

Weanling; Filly by Stam B. 2:11; entered In 
the Kentucky Futurity and the Paciflo Breeders 
Futurity Stakes. 

Price, 8750 for both. 

Apply to or address A. M. SCHMIDT, Room 27 
Macdonough Building, Oakland. Cal. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 

Our Specialty: 
Boarding, Training and Take any car going 

Handling all kinds of to The Chutos 

Fancy Horses. 

A few Nice Rigs always on hand. 

Tra ning, Boarding and Sale Stables 

Hilton St. & 24ib Ave., opposite the Casino. 

Boarding and.Trahiintj Horses a Specialty. 

Horses for sale. Two ideal roadsters now on 
hand. Will show a quarter in 32 seconds, pulling 
a buggy. Stand 16 hands, weigh 1200. Ready 
for inspection at any time. 

Telephone: Park 377. T. C. CABNET. 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 

The oldest, the largest, the moat popular com- 
mercial school on the Paoltlc Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 30 teachers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually placed in positions. Send for catalogue. 



K. P. HEALU, President. 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIOH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 
S06 Mission St., cor. First, San Francisco. 



14 



(The Qvttfotx anb &pioncX#m&n 



[January 21, 1905 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of John Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALI, Manager. 



A GREAT RACEHORSE AND A GREAT SIRE. 

DIABLO 2:091-4 




His2:l51lstlnclude8Slr Alberts. 2:03?i,Clipper2:C6 D1 
ablito2:08'4, Tom Uarneal 2:08>/« Daedalion 2:11) Diodine 
2:10M. Diawtod2:lI, El Diablo 2: MM. Tags ftll«.HlJo 
el Diablo 2: 1 1H, Key del Diablo 2: 14* and Inferno 2:15. 

Diablo's Sire, Chas. Derby 2:20, 

Don Derby 2:WW. Much Better J:(>7*. Derby Princes* 
2 08V4 DtARLO2:09H, and 12 more with records better 
than 2:15 His grandsire, Steinway 2:25?i. hasslred five 
in the 2:10 list, and his great grandsire, Strathmore, 
sired two and the dams of four 2: 10 performers. 

Diablo's Dam, Bertha ^.ILKod'Jariin 

California. She has three 2:10 performers and five 2:15 
performers. Her sire has six in the 2:10 list and his 
}i daughters have produced eight In the 2:10 list. 

SEASON OF 1905 AT WOODLAND. 



FEE, 940 FOR THE SEASON. 
S6t> TO INSURE. 



Address 



C. D. CROOKH AM, 

WOODLAND, CAL. 



ZOLOCK 



Reg. No. 34471 

lace Record 2:09 j 



SIRE OF 




Foe, §50 for the Season, 

Usual Return Privileges. 



DELILAH (2) 2:16 1-2. AMBUSH (2) 2:20 

ZOLOCK 2:09^ is by McKinney 2:11* (sire of 11 in 
2:10 list); dam Gazelle 2:11V4 (dam of Zolock and 
Zephyr 2:11) by Gofsiper 2:143^ (sire of Gazelle 2:11 H. 
Miss Jessie 2:13^. etc ): second dam Gipsey (dam of 
Gazelle 2:11K, Ed Winship 2:15, etc ) by Gen. Booth. 
From Zolock's first crop of colts came Delilah 2: \(>H, 
winner of two-year-old paelng division of Breeders 
Futurity of 1904 and fastest pacing two-year-old of 
1904, and Ambush, two year-old trotting record 2:20. 

Will Make the Season of 1905 at 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles. 

For Tabulated Pedigree and further particulars 

3d d rcss 

HENRY DELANEY, Agent, 

UNIVERSITY FOSTOFFICE, CAL. 



HAL B. 2:04 



The Only High-Class 
on the Pacific Coast 



'Hal" Stallion 



HAL B. 2 04*4 was the sensation of the Grand Circuit In 1899, in which he started nine times, 
winning all bis races. He was the largest money winner of that season. HAL B. is full brother to 
Fanny Dlllard 2:03^, world's raoe record for pacing mares. Atllyearsof age he Is the sireof fou 
in the list. HAL B. is by Hal Dillard 2:043£ (sire of Fanny Dillard 2:03&. Hal B. 2:04*4. Hal Cllppe r 
2:07*4. Camblna Maid 2:08'<, Young Hal 2:10*i, Hallle Rackett 2:11, trotting, etc ), dam Ella (dam or 
Fanny Dillard fc089f and Hal B. 2:04*4) by Hlue Boy, son of Blue Bull 75; second dam by Blue Bull 75f 

HAL B is a handsome dark bay or brown stallion, stands 15.3*4 hands and Is an ideal horse in 
every particular. Remember this is your opportunity at home to breed to a distinguished represent 
attve of the great Tennessee pacing family, "The Hals." 

Season at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until April 15, 1905, 

All correspondence concerning HAL B. while on this Coast should be addressed to 

OMER VAN KIRK, 
University P. O , Los Angeles, Cal. 

Reference: West Milton Bank 



Terms, $50 Cash. 



Money refunded if mare proves not with foal. 
D. H. MAST, Owner, West Milton, Ohio. 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 



(Sire of Irish ?:«s*<, Fattest Four- Year- Old Pacer of JWX) 
By SIDNEY (Orandsire of LOU DILLON 1:58*4) 
Dam HATTIE (also dam of MONTANA 2:16). 
WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1905 AT 



Reg. No. 
31706 



SAN LORENZO 



SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS. 



MILPITAS 



C_ A frCA FOR THE SEASON. Good pasturage at »! per month 
rcc fO\J mares, but no responsibility for accidents or escapes 



pedigree and full particulars. Address 



WEDNESDAYS. THURS- 
DAYS and FRIDAYS. 



Best of care taken of 
Send for card containing 
WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



IRAN A LTO - 1 5&\ '---Trotting Race Record 2:12J. 

The only stallion with so fast a record whose sire and dam held world's records His sire Is Palo 
Alto 2:085i by Electioneer: his dam Is Elaine 2:20, champion three-year-old of her day. and the dam 
of four and grandam of twelve in the list; second dam the great Green Mountain Maid, dam of nine 
in the list and also dam of the great Electioneer. 

IRAN A LTO'S first colt took a record of 2:12*4 trotting, and he has sired five mo.e In the list 
Will make the Season of 1905 In charge of 

$40 for the Season. H. S. HOGOBOOM, Woodland, Cal. 

A Horse Funeral 

Is sad, expensive and unnecessary because nine-tenths of them can be saved I 
by the prompt and patient use of the old, reliable remedy, CRAFT'S DIs- 
TEMl'EK • COUGH CUKE which has cured thousands of cases of epi- 
zootic, caiarrhal fever, pinkeye, distemper, coughs, colds, influenza etc 
Sold and guaranteed by reputable druggists in II and 50c bottles; or direct" 
prepaid. Send for fine, new booklet, "Practical Pointers," free. 




••••• ■ | 

***** ■ H ••••• 
•••• lAMI WUA A A • •••• 



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Pedigrees 

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OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



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• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a.. 

• ••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a. 

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• •••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••v.*. 

• ••■••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a**. 

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•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••a*** 



California Trotting Bred 
HORSES 

Giving Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



Thoroughbred Pedigrees 



••••• 



::::: Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



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STALLION 
CARDS 

Posters, Folders, etc 

(WITH OR WITHOUT ILLUSTRATIONS) 

Compiled and Printed 
at Reasonable Rates 



Every Facility for Tracing 
Pedigrees and Performances 

Neat and Artistic Work 



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Wells Medicine Co, 



Chemists p ml 
Uermolo|j;iRta 



3 3d st, Lafayette, Ind. 



Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 21, 1905 1 



SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send for 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mail Orders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



IF WE COULD SEE YOU and take 
you into our FACTORY, WE could 
easily SHOW 




YOU WHY 

The Parker 

GUN is the BEST 

in the WORLD 



WE aim to make and do make the BEST possible production 
of the GUNMAKER'S ART. WE are jealons of onr reputation 
and will not cheapen the quality of our GUN, no matter what 
others may do. IF you want a GUN you can confide in us. 

Write today. 



30 CHERRY STREET, MERIDEN, CONN. 



The Hunter One-Trigger 



Is 



Absolutely 
Perfect 



Put on any L. C. SMITH 
GUN, new or old. 

SEND FOR CATALOGUE 



HUNTLR ARMS CO., FULTON, NEW YORK 

SMITH GUNS SHOOT WELL. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




NO. 4 List, $100 



WARRANTED SUPERIOR |TO ANT OTHER 
MAKE COSTING »35 MORE. 




We Make 16 Qrades, $17.75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

Coast Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 



Or 

to 



T M LITCHFIELD & CO —Drivers' Suits, 
« • Colors and Caps, Official Badges. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 12 Post St., San Francisco. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS — O.CINTO HERD— 77 pre- 
miums Cal State Fair 1902-3-4. Young stork for 
sale Write us what you want Est. of W H. 
Howard. 206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 

SHIRE HORSES (four Stallions, foals of 
19U2) sired by British Oal<, No. 5687, A. S. H. A., 
Sweepstakes Drafter at California State Fairs 
Estate of W. H Howard, 206 Sansome Street 
San Francisco. 

PETER SAXK& SON. Llok House, S. F..Cal 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited 



HOLSTEINS- BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work heri: 90% winners atStat- and county fair*, 
show rl&g, and every butter contest glace 1885 in 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEINS AND DURHAMS. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry Estab- 
lished 1876. William NUes & Co.. I on Angeles 
CM. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



MARK LEW 
lAficrl C.utlrr 
ind Filler... 
I'm* Suit* 
from 

$25.00 u\> 




Only the 
Bril Help 
Lmplcncd... 
All work 
dune on the 



3<S Oary SI.. S. F. Rooms 19-20 Phone Grant IS8 



S25 SUIT $1 

-pvON'T SEND MONEY. Write for particulars 
and we will tell you how you can get a $25 
Ladles' or Gents' tailor-made Suit or Overooat 
for$l. Write today. Address UNION TAILOR- 
ING CO , 230 East Ontario St , Chicago, 111. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie Aisler aid Oolii Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
in the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
in response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OP KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee n.) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



JAS. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROOS RROS. 




MEN 



25 to 27 



Outfitters 
to 



BOYS 
KEARNY ST. 

at POST 




After a Brush 

you will find 

ABSORBINE 

quick to remove 
~'- r the inflammation 

from any bruise or 
strain. No blister, no hairgone, and you can 
use the Hoise. ABSORBINE removesany 
soft bunch in a pleasing manner. $2.00 per 
bottle of regular dealers or delivered. 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 



SPRINGFIELD, 



MASS. 



Also manufacturer of Taroleum for horses feet. 

For sale bv Mack&Cn Langiey &MichaelsCo., 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET SIZE) 



100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



M. H. McMANUS 

TRAINER AND DRIVER 

Has opened a Public Stable at 
PLEASANTON 

and will train Trotters and Parers at reasonable 
rate-i. Mb McManus has trained and driven 
ihree 2:10 performers and one that afterwards 
took a record of 2:05!4 Corresponde-ce solicited. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 
BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Klehth Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Pape 1324 



COCOANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOB 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

FOB SALE IN LOTS TO SUIT BY 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 

ao8 California Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



COLLIES 



]\ r AGNIFICENTLY BRED PUPPIES AND 
grown stock. Five stud dogs in service. 
GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS, P. O. Box 
1807 Spokane, Wash. 



ST. BERNARDS. 



AT STUD-CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee 120. 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE. 
x Scottie Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. MBS. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O. 
B. C. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Tarln 

iNPlltMARY AND RESIDENCE— 81 1 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts.. San Francisco 
Telephone: South 456. 



E>x*. v\/ xxx, F*. £}gan. 

M. R. C. V. S.. F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edlnburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspe ctor forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California; Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office. 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



60 YEARS- 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 
Designs 
Copyrights &c. 

Anvone sending a sketch and description may 
quickly aa certain our opinion free whether an 
invention is probably patentable. Conimunica- 
tlons strictly confidential. HANDBOOK on Patents 
sent free. OMest agency for securing patents. 

Patents taken through Munn & Co. receive 
special notice, without c harg e, in the 

Scientific American. 

A handsomely Illustrated weekly. Tinrsrest cir- 
culation of any scientific journal. Terms, $3 a 
year; four months, $1. Sold by all newsdealers. 

MUNN & Co. 36,Broadwa¥ New York 

Branch Office. 025 F St., Washington, D. C. 



BLAKE, MOFFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Telephone Main 190 

CALIFORNIA 
Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Honrs. 



CAPS ULES 



f 



Snpertor to Copaiba, Cohens or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 

And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prloes. 
Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Street 
San Francisco, Cal. 



16 



! January 21 , 1905 




HORSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Cal. 



% 
% 



IMC 



ES O O 



CRAM) AMERICAN H ANDICAP It. D. Ouptll 

CONSOLATION HANDICAP W. H. Heer 

(IKNKKAL TOTAL AVKKAOE OF Mil: O A H J. I.. I). Morrison 

GKAND CANADIAN HANDICAP Messrs. Mayhew aud Haitlry 



; THE 
THE 
^S* THE 
iji THE 

S These important events were won with U. M. C. Shells. The year 1904 has also proved the success of the New C. M. C. .33 Primer and the New U. M. C. Sh 



THE SUNNY SOUTH HANDICAP AT TA11GKTS 

THE SUNNY SOUTH HANDICAP AT BIRDS 

THE AMERICAN AMATEUR CHAMPIONSHIP AT KIRKS 
THE 5-SIAN SQUAD WORLD'S RECORD The I H < 



I 



W. H. Heer 

T. E Huhby 3£ 

..!>. T. Bradley ?»f 
N.»iit!iern Squad 
ort Range shells JjL 



UNION METALLIC CARTRIDGE COMPANY 



TjT Agency, 313 Broadway, New York City, N. Y. 

8G and HH Front Street, San Prancisco. 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN.3J* 

E E DRAKE, Pacific CoMt Manager. ( 



fttNctmm 



^vnvt^cxjivriTioiNr, rifles, shotgutvts 

WERE AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE. 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



DuPONT SMOKELESS 
Again the Champion. 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 
won the 
Professional and Amateur 
Championships 
for 1904. 
Mr. Fred Gilbert, 

High Professional 
Mr. John W. Garrett, 

High Amateur 

Why don't you shoot 
DuPONT SMOKELESS? 



Clabrough, Bolcher & Go, 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg„ 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



NAP 



The Greatest Evrnt 
In 1904 

The Grand American Haodloap 
was won with 

"INFALLIBLE." 

During this Meeting "Infallible" 
also won 
High General Average 
while 

"SCHULTZE" 

won the Preliminary Handicaps 
and 

"E. C." 

The Consolation Handicap. 
L.AFLIN & RAND POWDER CO. 



GUNS 
Gun Goods 

W-Send for Catalogue. 




FISHING 

Tackle 



538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



FACTORY . , 
LOADED 



SHELLS 



DU PONT 

"E. C." 
SCHULTZE 
HAZARD 



SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 
BALLISTITE 
LAFLIN & RAND 
INFALLIBLE " 



What More do vou Want? 



2 



(The $v€&ev txn'c *&p&vt&man 



f January 28, 19(f) 



St. Louis Fair 
Association 

STAKE EVENTS 1905, 1906. 

ENTRIES CLOSE FEBRUARY I, I905. 

Meeting- from June 3rd to September 2nd. 
STAKES FOR 1905. 



IN.lOGUKAL HANDICAP 

June 3rd. 
THK DKBC1 ANTE 

June 10th. 
THK KIMJKKGARTEN... 

June 24th 
MI'S V ALLIES BELUNO. 

July 1st. 
INDKFENDENCE HANDICAP.. 

.lulv 4th. 
JK. CHAMPIONSHIP 

.luly 8th 
CLl'H HBHBEBS HANDICAP.. 

July 15ih 
MID SUMMKK HANDICAP 

July If'jnd 
N ATI VIE NIKSEKV 

July .".iili. 
COl'MKV CU B HANDICAP 

August 5th 
GASCON AUK MELMNG 

AUKUHt I Hth. 
LEMP HANDICAP 

August 19th 
AUGUST SELLING 

August ;<iih. 
SKPTKM HER SELLING . 

September 2nd. 



..ta«0 Added. Entry fee $10. A handicap for three-year- 
olds and upwards One Mile 

. .$1500 Added. Entry fee 810. Eor two-year-old Allies. .. . 

Nine-Sixteenths Mile 

. $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year-old colts and 

geldings *. Five-Klghths Ml he 

..$1500 Added. Entry lee $10. For three-year-olds and up- 
wards One Mile 

$2000 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and up- 
wards One and Three-Sixteenths Miles 

. $-.'000 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year-olds 

Thteo-Fonrths Mile 

. .$3000 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

upwards One and One-Ouarter Miles 

$1500 Added. Entry fee $10 For three-year-olds and up- 
wards One Mile and Seventy Yards 

...$1500 Added. Entry fee$10. For two year-olds 

Five-Eighths MI'e 

.. $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

upwards Three- Fmrths Mile 

. $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year-olds and 

upwards One and One-Sixteenth Miles 

. .$1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For two-year-olds 

Three-Fonrths Mile 

. $1500 Added. Entry foe $10. For three-year olds and 

upwards Three-Fourths Mile 

. $1500 Added. Entry fee $10. For three-year olds and 
upwards One Mile 



The $50,000 St. Louis Handicap for 1906. f^ZiLn^Xm\^ 

stakes for three-year olds and upward in 1906 (foals of 1903 and preceeding years) The St. Louts 
Fair Association guaranteees the gross value to he $50,000, of which $6000 to second and $'J000 to third, 
and the fourth to save its stake. Liabilties as follows: Two-year-olds at time of entry by sub- 
scription of $10 each. February 1, 1905; $15 additional if not declared by May 1, 1905: $50 additional if 
not declared by July 1. 1905: $75 additional if not declared by October I. 1905; $100 additional if not 
declared by February 1, 1906' $i50 additional to start Three year-olds and upward at time of entry 
by subscription of $->0 each, February I. 1905: $30 additional if not declared by May 1. 1905; $75 addi- 
tional if not declared by July 1. 1905; $100 additional if not declared by October 1, 1905; $125 additional 
if not declared by February 1. 1906; $-i50 additional to start. 

The stakes to be re-opened February l, 1908, and entries accepted on that date, upon payment of 
$750; $250 additional to start. Weights to be published Aoril IS, 1906. A winner, after publication of 
weights, of $1500 twice, or $2500once, penalized fi lb*.: of $2500 twice, or $1000 once. 9 lbs: of $4000 
twice, or $701 ODce 12 lbs ; if handicapped at 112 lbs. or over, these penalties shall be reduced by one- 
third: at 120 lbs or over, by two-thirds; at 130 lbs or over there shall be no penalty. In the case of 
three-year-olds, penalties shall not cause the weight to exceed 115 lbs. One Mile and a Quarter 

For further information and entry blanks address 

JOHN H ACH M EISTER, Sec'y, St. Louis, Mo. 



SECOND PAYMENT DUE FEB.1,'05 

$5 ON EACH ENTRY 

IN THE 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stake No. 5 



For Mares Served 1904. Foals of 1905. Stake Closed Oct. 15, 1904. 
MONEY DIVIDED: 



$3,000 for Three-Year-Old Trotters. 

mm) for Nominator of Dam of Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot. 
1.850 for Two-Year-Old Trotters 

2UO for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two-Year-Old Trot. 
100 to Owner of Stallion. Sire of Winner 
of Three-Year-Old Trot when mare 
was bred. 



1,000 for Three-Year-Old Pacers. 
■2(i(i for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace. 
750 for Two-Year-Old racers. 
200 for Nominator of Dam of Winner 

of Two Year-Old Pace. 
100 to Owner of Stallion, Sire of Winner 

of Three-Year-Old Pace when mare 

was bred. 



Don't Fail to Make This Payment. 

REWEMUKIt THK SUBSTITUTION CLAUSE: " If the mare proves barren, or slips, or 

has a dead foal, or twins, or if either the mare or foal dies before February 1, 1906, her nominator 
may sell and transfer his nomination or substitute another mare or foal, regardless of ownership " 

Be Sure and Make Payment on Time. 

E. P. HEALD, President. F. W. KELLEV, Secretary, 

36 Geary Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



0AKW00DS STOCK FARM 



PERCHERON, 
BELGIAN and 
COACH 
STALLIONS 



California's Largest Importing and Breeding Establishment. 

High-class Stock always on hand. Good terms. Moderate prices. Liberal guarantee Visitors 
alirays welcome. Address all correspondence to 

OAKWOODS STOCK FARM, FRANCIS I. HODOK1MS, Prop., STOCKTON. C\L 



SINGMASTER & SONS.of Keota Iowa, 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS (IF 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Itaro at 

127 St. John Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class stock always on band. It will pay to call and Inspect stock if you are in need of a 
good stallion C. O, STANTON, San Jose Manager. 



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Giving* Performances of the Get 
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Thoroughbred Pedigrees 

Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates 



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1 STALLION 1 

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Breeder and Seedsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



January 28 1905J 



° 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 

Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific oast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
Telephone: Black 586. 



Occident Stake Entries and Payments. 

We are pleased to print the following list of entries 
to the Occident Stake of 1907 and second and third 
payments respectively on foals entered in the stakes 
of 1906 and 1905, as they show that Pacific Coast 
breeders are still taking much interest in this stake 
which is the greatest annual event on this Coast for 
three-year old trotters. 

As will be seen by reference to the lists printed here- 
with, there have been 66 entries to the stake of 1907, 
which is for foals of last year, 56 second payments in 
the stake to be trotted in 1906, and 38 third payments 
on the colts and fillies entered in the stake to be trot- 
ted this year: 



Terms— One Year S3, Six Months SI. 75, Three Months 81 ORIGINAL ENTRIES TO OCCIDENT STAKE OF 1907. 



STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 
Money snould be sent by postal order draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Kelley, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, January ?8, 1905 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 



DIABLO 2:09K C D. Crookham, Woodland 

HAL B. 2:04V, Omer Van Kirk, University P. O., Los Angeles 

IRAN ALTO 2:I2M H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland 

KINNEY LOU 2:07J£ Budd Doble, San Jose 

MAC DIRECT Capt. C. H. Williams, Palo Alto 

MONTEREY 2:09>i P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo 

STRATHWAY 2:19 James Thompson, Pleasanton 

ZOLOCK 2:09M Henry Delaney, University P. O., Cal 

ZOMBRO'2:ll Geo. T. Beckers, University, Cal 



AT A MEETING of the Board of Directors of the 
Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Associa- 
tion held in this city last week the question of District 
Fairs for the State of California was discussed, and as 
it was the unanimous opinion of the Board that 
properly conducted fairs are of great value to the 
State, it was decided to appoint a committee to go to 
Sacramento and consult with the Governor in regard 
to the restoration of the appropriations formerly 
made to aid these institutions. The committee con- 
sisted of President E. P. Heald and Directors Col. J. 
C. Kirkpatrick, I. L. Borden, Frank H. B'irke and 
Geo. W. Kingsbury, and Wednesday of this week was 
appointed as the day for the trip. Owing to illness 
Messrs. Burke and Kirgsbury were prevented from 
accompanying the committee, but Messrs. Heald, 
Kirkpatrick and Borden went to Sacramento on the 
day selected, where they were met by Senator Ben F« 
Rush, of Solano county, who had kindly made an ap- 
pointment with Governor Pardee for a conference. 
The Governor expressed himself to the committee as 
strongly favoring district fairs, belitv'iDg them to be 
valuable as educators. He thought, however, that 
the present number of 46 districts could be reduced 
materially with benefit to all. The main question 
with the Governor, however, was a financial one. He 
favored appropriating money for the fairs if the State 
Treasury contained sufficient coin, after more neces- 
sary things were provided for. President Heald 
states that the Governor gave the committee a very 
pleasant and cordial reception, as well as much of his 
valuable tim9 and displayed no antagonism wha ever 
to properly conducted district fairs. This is encour- 
aging and it now remains for the breeders, farmers 
and fruit growers of the State who favor these fairs 
to unite on some plan that will meet with the endorse- 
ment of the Legislature and the Governorand see that 
it is passed at this session. Tbe P. C. T. H. B. A. has 
shown commendable enterprise by sending its com- 
mittee to SacraJiento and is ready to aid in every 
honorable way, any measure that will re-establish the 
district fairs which were once so popular in California 
and which have done 30 much for the breeding and 
agricultural interests of the State. Its directors 
are ready to give their time without pay to 
the furtherance of any plan which the district 
boards or the breeders and farmers of the 
State think just and practicable, by which annual ex- 
positions of the State's products can be again 
resumed. It has been suggested that the districts 
remain as at present constituted and that one-half of 
them give fairs on alternate years. This would re 
quire only one-half the former appropriation. An- 
other suggestion is that the State be re-districted and 
the number of districts reduced to eight-or ten. It is 
said that the State of Ohio has a law by which the 
district fairs receive direct State aid, the amounts 
being provided for in the State levy of taxes, and that 
the law is popular with the people. It may be that 
such a law would meet the approval of the Legisla- 
ture and the Goverror. There are many suggestions 
that can be offered, but the main thing now is to 
organize a body that will take energetic action on the 
best measure and work for its adoption. There 
should be a gathering of those most interested in 
district fairs, comprising cattle, sheep, swine and 
and horse breeders, farmers and fruit growers, manu- 
facturers and miners, and all others who know that 
annual exhibits of their products are profitable to 
them and to the entire State, and when a measure is 
agreed upon It will not be such a difficult matter to 
secure its adoption. 



John Arnett's b c Chas. Schweizer by Sidney Arnett 
-Miss Brummer. 

Thos. H. Brent 's b f Reina del Norte by Del Norte- 
Laurelia. 

Chas. E. Barrows' b f Pearl Mack by Phal Norte- 
Miss Baker. 

Mrs. S. V. Barstow's br f Miss Allright by Greco- 
Maud J. 

T. W. Barstow's br c by Nearest-Bessie S. 

Alex Brown's b f Nocha by Nusbagak-Pioche; b f 
by Nushagak-Red flower; br c by Nushagak-Addie B. ; 
b c by Prince Ansel-Mamie Martin; b f by Prince 
Ansel-Bonny Derby. 

W. O. Bowers' ch c W. O. B. by Silver Bee-Sadie 
Benton. 

Martin Carter's b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Bonnie 
Derby; b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Lew G. 

John A Cole's Lady Leroy by Petigru-Belle Ray- 
mon. 

Christianson & Thompson's br f by Bonnie Direct- 
Per Z) ; 

W. G. Durfee's b c by Petigru-Ida Direct: ch f by 
Petigru-Joannah Treat; blk c by Coronado-by Son of 
Nutwood ; blk f by Coronadc-Lady Gossiper. 

L. Y. Dollenmayer's blk c Albert Derida by Robt. 
Direct-Ida May. 

J. P. Dunn's b f Stambia by Stam B.-Mora Mae. 

Geo. W. Ford's b c Dewneer by Neernut-Dew DroD. 

C. L. Griffith's blk c by Bonnie Direct-Belle; blk f 
by Bonnie Direct-Victoria S. 

E A. Gammon's b c Ed Geers by Bayswater Wilkes- 
Urana. 

J. M. Hackett's blk f Silver Slipper by Suomi-Lotta 
H. 

E. P. Heald 's blk c by Monterey-Honor. 

Wm. Hashagen's br f Fannie H. by Azmoor-Chick- 
weed. 

Geo. W. Hayes' ch f by Silve- Bee-Bessie. 

Mrs.L. J H. Hastings' b c Alone by Petigru-Juliet D. 

F. Hahn's blk f by Chas. Derby-Nellie Emmoline. 

J . B. I verson's b c Baron Wilhelm by Barondale- 
Wilhelmine II.; blk c Iverno by Robin-Ivoneer. 

J. A Jones' blk c Chehalem by Capt. Jones-Daisy 
Q. Hill; blk f by Cap*. Jones-Amy May; br c 
Admiral Togo by Capt. Jones-Maggie Caution. 

T. F. Kiernan'sch c Guy wood by Pacheco W. -Daisy 
Nutwocd. 

La Siesta Ranch's b c by Iran Alto-Lady Belle Isle. 

M. L. Lusk's b c Zeloso by Zombro-Sallie Brooks. 

M. A. Murhpv 's b f by Zombro-Nellie Bly; b f by 
Zombro-Maid of Monterey. 

W. W. Mendenhall's b f Maytime by Stam B. -Elsie 
Downs. 

D. S Matthews' b f Valentine B. by Edward B.- 
Rhony G. 

Rosedale Stock Farm's b f by Wash. McKinney-by 
Daly. 

Valencia Stock Farm's b c Captain by Direct Heir- 
Rosed rop 

Thos. Smith's b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Daisy S. 

S. Siljan's b f Martha H/by Iran Alto-Idabelle. 

Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b c by Sidney Dillon-Bye 
Bye; b f by Sidney Dillon-Biscara; b f by Sidney Dil- 
lon— Adioo; b f by Sidney Dillon-By Guy; b c by Sidney 
Dillon-Stamboulita; b f by Sidney Dillon-Russie 
Russell. 

Jas. J . Summgrfield 's b c Lord Dillon by Sidney 
Dillon-Roblet. 

Alfred Solano's blk f by Petigru-Lady Jane. 

Frank S. Turner's ch c by F. S. Turner-Caritone. 

L. H. Todhunter's b c by Zombro-The Silver Bell. 

Vendome Stock Farm's b f Better Still by Iran 
Alto-Muoh Better. 

R. G. White's blk c Gen. Nogi by Strathway-Snow 
Fiake. 

Geo. L. Warlow's b c Iole by Athablo-LuTtrine; b c 
Gen. Nogi by Athablo-Cora Wickersham; b f Soisette 
by Guy McKinney-Narcola. 

F. W. Wadham's ch f Irene S. by Petigru-Joannah 
Treat 

Jas. W. Zibbell's b c Teddy Mc by Tom Smith-Kate 
Lumry. 

Berryman & Elwert b c Monterey McKinuey by 
Monterey-Dot McKinney. 
P. Foley's b c Monte Norfolk by Montesol. 

ENTRIES MAKING SECOND PAYMENTS IN THE OC- 
CIDENT STAKE OF 1906. 

J. F. Anderson's blk f Delia Derby 
S. Bartlett'sch f Flora Lowell 

Alex. Brown's b f by McKinney-Pioche: b f by Nush- 
agak-Red flower; br c by Nushagak-Bonny Derby; 
br c by Nushagak-Everett 

T. W. Barstow's brc Nearest McKinney 

J. H. Bohon's br f Zona B. 

Geo. T Becker's br f Bena Brack 

Thos. H. Brent's br f Magladi 

Geo. H. Cressey's ch c by L. W. Russell-Elsie 

Jas. B. Smith's b c Lord Dillon 

Martin Carter's b o by Nutwood Wilkes-Bessie C ; 
b c by Nutwood Wilkes-Lew G.; ch f by T C. -Queen 
C. 

T. J. Drais' b c Drais McKinney 

M- C. Delano's b f by Wm. Harold-Directess 



Peter Fryatt's b f Easter Maid 

Josie S. Frary's ch c Roy Dillon 

Patrick Foley's br c Major Montesol 

Griffith & McConnell's br f bv Bonnie Direct-Jennie 
Mc; blk f by Bonnie Direct-Nettie O ; b f by Bon- 
nie Direct-Guiger 

Geo. W. Hayes' ch c Joe Bowers 

J. B Iverson's bl c Robineer 

Orville O. Jonas' b c by Neernut-Midget 

J. A. Kirkman's brc Volway 

T F. Kiernan's ch c Vasnut 

Geo. A. Kelly'srn c Birdson 

Wm. Leech's b f Hiawatha 

T. S. Montgomery's b c by McKinney -Dixie 

C. W. Helm's b c by Monochrome-Belle 

Geo. C. Need 's be Golden Baron 

E. C. Peart's b c Electro 

W. Parson's b c McKinney P 

Rosedale Stock Farm's b f by Wash. McKinnev- 
Dalia J 

Mrs. Sol Runyon's b c by Nushagak-Altwood 
Alfred Solano's b f Direct Stamboula; br f Belle 

Petigru; b c Prince De Gru 
Thos. Smith's ch c by Nutwood WilkeE-Daisy S 
Sutherland & Chadbourre's b c Sam G 
Santa Rosa Stock Farm's b f by Sid nov Dillon-By 

By; ch f by Sidney Dillon-Carlotta Wilkeb; b f by 

Sidney Dillon-By Guy; b c by Sidney Dillon-Pansy; 

ch c by Sidney Dillon-Russie Russell; ch by Sidney 

Dillon-Biscara 
L. H. Todhunters's b c The Silver Hunter; b c 

Gerald G 

Prank S. Turner'sch c Judge Dillnn 

Valencia Stock Farm's br f by Derby Heir-G'endo- 
veer;blk f by Direct Heir-Rosedrop 

Vendome Stock Farm's b c Alto Kinney; b f Mrs. 
Weller 

M. G. Gill's br c Kinney G. by Kinney Lou 

ENTRIES MAKING THIRD PAYMENTS IN THE OCCI- 
DENT STAKE OF 1905 

C. A. Arvedson's b c Rettus 
W. O Bower's br c Ferd Madison; cb f Silvia B 
Alex Brown's br f by Nushagak-Addie W; b c by 
Nushagak-Pioche; b f by Prince Ansel-Mamie Mar- 
tin 

A. E. Mastin's b c Sir Carlton 
W. C. Greene's b f Jessie Mc. 

Martin Carter's b f by Nutwood Wilkes-Bessie C 

S. Comisto's b f Alice C 

Mrs. L. J. H. Hastings' b f Princess Louise 

Geo W. Ford 's b f Colaneer 

Faris Stock Farm's b f Monabella Benton 

E. P. Heald's b c San Juan 

S H. Hoy's ch c Ben Hoy 

J. B. Iyerson's b c North Star; ch c Derby Chief 
G W Kingsbury's ch f Delia K. 
Wm. Morgan's blk c Kaiser; b c Una Boy; brc 
Signet 

Mrs Sol Runyon's b c by Exioneer-Dextress; b c by 
Mendocino-Coressa 

Wm. B. Rankin's b f McKinney Belle 

W J Leet's b f Still Better 

Fred Raschpn's b f by Iran Alto-Bell Bird 

Jas. K. Wilson's b f Easter Lilly 

Rosedale Stock Farm's b c by Washington McKin- 
ney-Dalia 

Thos. Smith's b f by McKinney-Daisy S 
L. H. Todhunter's bf Zombell; b f Zomitella 
Valencia Stock Farm's br f La Belle Harriett; b f 
by Direct Heir-Rosed .'op 
S. K. Trefry'sblk c Kenneth C 

W. G. Durfee's b f by McKinney-Leonor; b f by 
Coronado-dam by Guide; b f Bellemont 
John A. Cole's blk c Prince Valentine 



Sacramento News. 



Breeder and Sportsman— L. M. Clark of this 
city had the misfortune to lose his fine bay stallion 
Ouiboul 2:22$ January 19th, the horse falling and 
breaking his neck in his stall. Ouiboul was by the 
great and handsome stallion Stamboul, and was con- 
sidered a most promising sire, as his colts were fine 
lookers. His death is a severe loss to Mr. Clark who 
will have the sympathy of horsemen and breeders in 
general. 

Great interest is manifested by the Sacramento 
people as well as others throughout the State in re- 
gard to the sale of the old and the building of a new 
agricultural park and race track hero, and we are all 
hoping the bill will pass providing for the new build- 
ings and that work will be started soon. 

A few of the horsemen are still holding fort at the 
historic old grounds, notwithstanding the fact that 
the buildings are being torn do n n, and while there Is 
a scene of desolation due to the removal of buildings 
and the piling up of debris, it makes one's blood tingle 
to recall the races where jockeys and drivers and 
horses were straining every nerve to reach the wire 
first. It is pleasant at times to think of by gone days, 
the soul stirring finishes and to hear again the shouts 
of the multitude as its favorite dashes to the wire and 
snatches the crown of victory from tho jaws of defeat. 

Among those who are still occupying stalls here 
at presentare Walter Mastin with Falroso2:19, Marvin 
Wilkes (3) 2:18. Penrose and others. S. U. Mitchell 
has Peter J. and others, Chris. Jorgenson has quite a 
string, A. Mastin is looking after theinterests of John 
A. 2:12ij, Sir Carlton and a few more, Vet Tryon has 
quite a number and Mr. Steward several. 

Mrs. E. W. Callendine has recently sold her promis- 
ing filly by Nutwood Wilkes to J. C. Montgomery of 
Davisville, Cal. 
Sacramento, Jan. 25, 1905. 



Norine. 



4 



ULliz gveeoev cmi» mparts rocm 



[January 28, 1906 



Lou Milton's Dam Again Identified. 

Ply, the Ralston mare that was bred to Milton 
Medium and produced Lou Milton, dam of Lou Dillon, 
has again been identified and has a new pedigree. 
This time the story comes through the Horse Review, 
of Chicago, which devotes a page to it. Our friend 
Jacob Brolliar, of Hanford, owner of My Way 2:20, 
the gray filly that wa9 a good second to Friskarina 
2:133 in th e Breeders Futurity pacing stake for three- 
year-olds last year, has furnibhed the information to 
the Review that may lead to Fly's breeding being 
established. The letter which appeared in the Review 
of January 17th is as follows: 

Visalia, Cal., Jan. 8, 1905. 
Editor Horse Review, Chicago, RL: 

The return of the trotting queen, Lou Dillon, to her 
native heath reminds me of my pencil notes made 
last summer while out doing the California races. It 
seems strange that after all the research of the great- 
est writers and pedigree experts of America should be 
in vain to establish the breeding of the trotting queen, 
that I should accidentally hit upon a chain of evi> 
dance that can establish in full and beyond a reason- 
able doubt the breeding of the dam of Lou Milton, 
dam of Lou Dillon. 

Some time during my stay at San Jose, Mr. Martin 
Carter, owner of Nutwood Wilkes Stock Farm, in- 
troduced me to the veteran, Frank Taylor, of Ala- 
meda avenue, San Jose. Mr. Taylor invited me to 
his home to see a colt, I having told him that I was 
on the lookout for something for a sire. After an in- 
spection of his stock, we repaired to his hospitable 
home, and while there I incidentally picked up a 
Murphy stock catalogue and noticed Lou Milton's 
name in a tabulated pedigree and remarked that it 
was a pity her dam's breeding was unknown. To my 
surprise Mr. Taylor answered that "it is known." 

But before going farther with this history, (for such 
it is), I propound this question for the benefit of the 
reader: Who is Mr. Taylor, and by what authority 
does he speak? Mr. Taylor and the late Orrin Hickok 
were both race riders and intimate friends in boyhood, 
Hickok being in the employ of Mr. William Maxwell, 
an owner of runners. Later Mr. Hickok came to Cali- 
fornia and induced Mr. Maxwell to come to the Coast 
to engage in the livery business with him. With this 
object in view Mr. Maxwell brought Fly — dam of Lou 
Milton— and Gypsy with him; but, being dissatisfied 
with the prospect for a livery business, he sold Fly 
and Gypsy to Mr. Ralston and returned to his old 
home in Wisconsin. Mr. Taylor was acquainted with 
Mr. Maxwell, also knew Fly and Gypsy. He saw and 
talked with Mr. Maxwell after his disposal of them tc 
Mr. Ralston, and after his return to Wisconsin. Mr. 
Taylor says that it is well known that Flying Cloud, 
sire of the once sensational Badger Girl, sired both 
Fly and Gyp9y. If I remember correctly, Powell 
Bros., of Beaver Dam, Wis., owned Badger Girl. She 
and the mares Fly and Gypsy were all sired by Flying 
Cloud, a trotting-bred horse brought from Ohio to 
Dodge county, Wisconsin. 

Only a few weeks ago I returned to San Jose, and 
again meeting Mr. Taylor, I told him I was on my 
way to the Green Meadows Stock Farm at Santa Clara 
to get Hambletonian Wilkes, I having bought him. 
Mr. Taylor insisted upon driving me over in his buggy, 
a distance of about three miles. During the trip, this 
same question came up again when he told me once 
more of an old horseman still living at Beaver Dam 
who knew the breeding in full of Fly, and was to give 
me his name, but in my hurry to get Wilkes ready 
for shipment, I forgot to got his address. Mr. Tay- 
lor is but nine years a res'dent of California; his home 
prior to coming here, being in Indianapolis, Ind. He 
has taking no notice of the controversies going the 
rounds of the horse papers a year ago, being devoted 
almost entirely to other business interests, but he 
promised me that he would give me or any one who 
desired it, information sufficient to establish Fly's 
breedingin full. I am fully satisfied that Flying Cloud 
is the sire of the dam of Lou MiltoD. Anyone desiring 
further information can obtain it by addressing Mr. 
Frank Taylor, Alameda Ave., San Jose, Cal. 

Jacob Brolliar. 

There is one thing about Mr. Taylor's story which 
makes it better than any of the other numerous 
attempts to identify her — it is an actual identification. 
He says her name was Fly when she was brought 
here, states who brought her to California, where she 
came from and her sire. The Horse Review is in cor- 
respondence with Mr. Taylor and will no doubt get 
much more information about the matter that will at 
least be interesting reading, and we hope it will be 
able to unearth facts that will be complete and be- 
yonu question in regard to the matter. If it does, 
Mr. Brolliar and the Chicago paper will be entitled to 
much credit. 

The fact is that Mr. A. McFadyen, who owned Lou 
Milton and bred Redwood 2:2H, Ethel Mack 2:25 and 
others from her, made an effort twenty years ago to 
ascertain her pedigree but was unable to trace it as 
all the parties here who knew anything of it were 
dead. Mr. Taylor was not a resident of California at 
that time and it may be that he is the very man who 
can furnish the facts that will lead to the establish- 
ment of Lou Milton's pedigree. We hope so, at least. 



• Thos. F. Adkins, of Rochester, N. Y., owner of 
Lisonjero 2:08}, has purchased a green pacer named 
Bessie Patchen, that has shown a trial in 2:07. She 
will be campaigned the coming season by Webb 
Howard. 



Fastest Horse of McKinney. 

Asall our readers know Budd Doble's great race 
trotter, Kinney Lou 2:07} is the fastest entire son of 
McKinney, a distinction that has been and will be 
taken Into consideration by California breeders who 
are looking for sons of that horse to send their mares 
to this year. Kinney Lou's reputation as a race 
horse was thoroughly established when he went 
down the Grand Circuit of 1903, a sick horse, and 
finished a winner of $11,450. As a sire, his reputation 
has yet to be made, but the reports from Tehama 
county where he made one season and part of another 
are such that it is safe to predict that he will have rep- 
resentatives in the list this year, as the three-year-olds 
by him are showing natural speed of a high order and 
are described as grand looking youngsters and all 
trotters Kinney Lou's seasons in Tehama county 
were very limited but he got nearly every mare with 
foal and some four or five of the three-year-olds are 
now being trained on the Red Bluff track. 1 he first 
year after Mr. Doble purchased him, Kinney Lou was 
taken Eist and raced. Last year he was in the stud 
at San Jose and served 41 mares and in nearly every 
instance the mares are safely in foal. This year the 
horse will again be in the stud to July 1st, and after 
that, Mr. Doble may take him East again as Kinney 
Lou is able to win in his class and reduce his record. 
He is from race-winning and producing families on 
both sides. Hfs sire is beyond all question the great- 
est of trotting sires, as no other stallion that ever 
lived has accomplished what he has in the stud. He 
has not only sired the champion race trotting mare of 
the world, but is also the sire of the champion five- 
mile trotter, the champion green trooting stallion, 
and of eleven 2:10 performars at seventeen years of 
age, a record unapproachable by any other horse. He 
is the greatest son of Alcyone, that was for his oppor- 
tunities, the greatest son of Geo. Wilkes as well as the 
greatest son of that greatest of all brood mares, 
Alma Mater. On his dam's side Kinney Lou comes 
from a distinguished family and carries a double cross 
of the Morgan blood that is coming to the front in 
such great trotters as Tiverton, 2:041; Sweet Marie, 
2:04} and others. Kinney Lou's dam was that old 
time favorite on California's tracks, Mary Lou, 2:17, 
whose gameness and speed won many hard races and 
who was never beaten until the wire was reached as 
she fought for the lead every inch of the way, and 
tried again as often as asked. Mary Lou was by Tom 
Benton and her dam Brown Jenny, was the dam also 
of Shylock 2:15J and Nei Winslow, pacer, 2:12}. 
Both these brothers to Mary Lou were racehorses 
like her. Game as a pebble and with wonderful 
powers of endurance, they won some of the hardest 
fought races trotted and paced on this coast in their 
day. Brown Jenny was by David Hill, Jr., a producing 
son of the producing sire David Hill 857, that was by 
Black Lion, a son of Black Hawk 5, he by Sherman 
Morgan and he by the original Justin Morgan. The 
third dam of Kinney Lou was by McCraoken's Black 
Hawk 767, a son of Black Hawk 5. It will be noticed 
that there are two crosses to Black Hawk 5, in Kinney 
Lou's dam, and as this Morgan blood is becoming 
more highly prized every year, the opportunity to 
get it through a son of the great McKinney, and that 
son the fastest of his trotting sons, Is one that should 
not be allowed to pass. Kinney Lou will make the 
season of 1905 at San Jose on the same terms as last 
year and those interested should send to Budd Doble 
for a card containing the horse's tabulated pedigree 
and picture, together with much valuable information 
in regard to him. 

In Twenty Years. 

It was not until the year 1884 that a 2:10 light- 
harness performer appeared, and in that year there 
were three horses that entered the list, and then 
there was a break and no more 2:10 performers ap- 
paared un-il 1890, in which year there appeared three 
more, but since the latter year, they have been com- 
ing pretty strong in numbers as figures show. The 
additions to the 2:10 list for the years named are as 
follows: 1891, sixteen; 1892, twenty; 1893, twenty-five; 
1894, thirty-three; 1895, sixty-two; 1896, forty-eight; 
1897, sixty-six; 1898, sixty-one; 1899, seventy; 1900, 
seventy-nine: 1901, sixty; 1902, ninety-seven; 1903, 
ninety-six; 1904, one hundred and four. Up to date, 
the total number of 2:10 performers is eight hundred 
and forty-three, and of this number two hundred and 
twenty-two are trotters and six hundred and twenty- 
one are pacers. — Spirit of the West. 



You Take No Chances 

When you use the well-known and time-tried treatment of g«rm 
diseases, Craft's Distemper & Cough Cure. For many years the 
manufacturers, The Wells Medicine Co., Lafayette, Ind., have 
sold this liquid remedy, which Is a preventive as well as a cure, 
and have steadily advertised to reiund the price In any case 
where It failed to cure distemper, coughs, pinkeye, catarrhal 
troubles, grippe and other germ diseases. It has the endorsement 
of many leading horsemen and veterinarians In all parts of the 
world. Horse owners should not fail to keep a supply on hand, as 
it Insures health to the horse and peace of mind to the owner. 



Diablo ia the Stud at Woodland. 

The breeders of California are fortunate that the 
great race horse and sire Diablo 2:09}, sire of twelve 
2:15 performers, will make the season of 1905 in this 
State, returning after an absence of two seasons in 
Oregon. He will be located at Woodland, where for 
two years he was the most popular stallion in the 
Sacramento Valley, and where there are now a large 
number of very promising two and three-year-olds by 
him in training. Our readers will remember that 
William Murray, who owned Diablo, took the great- 
est son of Charles Derby to Oregon two year6 ago, 
abd that Mr. Murray contracted pneumonia and 
died. Since that time Diablo has been in charge of 
Mr C. D. Crookham, a brother-in-law cf Mr. Murray, 
who has returned the stallion to Yolo county where 
he will make the season of 1905. 

Diablo gained a distinction last year which few 
stallions, if any, ever before achieved. In one day, 
on the same track, two of his get entered the 2:10 list. 
This happened at the Breeders meeting at Santa 
Rosa, when Tom Carneal and Daedalion both won 
their races and took records of 2:08* and 2:10 respec- 
tively. Diablo is the fire of the following members of 
the 2:15 list, viz.: Sir Albert S. 2:03}, Clipper 2:06, 
Diablito 2:08$, Tom Carneal 2:08J, Daedalion 2:10, 
Diodine 2:10}, Diawood 2:11, El Diablo 2:11}, Tago 
2:11}, Hijoel Diablo 2:11 J, Rey del Diablo 2:14}, and 
Inferno 2:15. This is an array of fast ones that stamp 
him as one of the leading sires of speed in California. 

The wise breeder always looks for a stallion bred in 
producing lines, and Diablo Is one of this sort par 
excellence. His sire Charles Derby is the sire of four 
2:10 performers, his grandsire Steinway has five in 
the 2:10 list and his great grand sire Strathmore has 
founded one of the greatest of the families founded 
by sons of Hambletonian 10, as it was from the Strath- 
more line that Lou Dillon, the first 2:00 trotter came. 
Bertha, the dam of Diablo, is the greatest living 
broodmare in California, and has already produced 
three in the 2:10 list, and five in the 2:15 list. She is 
by Alcantara, an own brother to Alcoyne, the sire of 
the great McKinney. 

With the splendid race horse qualities and magnifi- 
cent individuality which Diablo possesses, he is with- 
out question one of California's greatest stallions, and 
at the low fee of $40, which has been placed on his 
services, he will doubtless receive a large patronage. 
Excellent pasturage can be had at Woodland at a low 
rate and Mr. Crookham will be pleased to send tabu- 
lated pedigree and full particulars as to terms on 
application by mail to him at that address. See 
advertisement in this issue. 



Bbod of Three Great Sires. 

A three-year-old stallion of magnificent proportions 
is Mac Direct, owned by Capt. C. H. Williams of Palo 
Alto, and in the veins of the colt courses the blood of 
the three great sires— Nutwood 2:18}, Director 2:17 
and McKioney 2:11}. Mac Direct's sire is McKinney, 
his dam was sired by Director and his grandam by 
Nutwood. McKinney is beyond all question the lead- 
ing standardbred sire in the world today, and his 
greatness was achived by his own performances as a 
racehorse and the performances of his get on the race 
track. He has 11 in the 2:10 list and 34 in the 2:15 list, 
although he is only 17 years old, and the records of 
all these performers were made in actual races. Di- 
rector was one of the greatest racehorses that ever 
went down the Grand Circuit, and has founded a fam. 
ily of great racehorses and sires of racehorses. Nut- 
wood was a racehorse himself and defeated many of 
the best stallions of his day. In the stud he proved 
to be the greatest sire of broodmares that ever lived, 
his daughters having produced no less than forty-five 
trotters and pacers with records of 2:15 or better, and 
considerable more than two hundred 2:30 performers. 

Capt. Williams bred and raised Mac Direct, but the 
colt has been such a growthy fellow that he declined 
to have him trained for a record until he is older but 
had him worked sufficiently to show to his trainer, 
John Phippen, that be is one of the best prospects in 
California today. 

Capt. Williams has been importuned by several 
breeders to permit Mac Direct to serve a few mares, 
so concluded to place him in the stud and limit him to 
ten of approved breeding. He has already six mares 
booked, so those who wish to avail themselves of the 
services of such a magnificently bred son of McKinney 
will have to apply early. The fee will be $40 and the 
season will close July 1st. 

P. H. McEvoy of Menlo Park is offering two hand- 
some Princa Airlie stallions for sale— Milbrae (trot- 
ting record 2:16*) and Menlo Boy 3741. For particu- 
lars see advertisement. *tf 



The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms, private baths, telephone, 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 



January 28, 1905] 



Successful Young Sire. 

One of the fastest, best bred and best looking sons 
of the great McKinney 2: 11 J is the stallion Zolock, 
that took a race record of 2:09| last year. What is 
most remarkable, however, is that two of his two- 
year-olds, members of his very first crop of colts, 
entered the 2:20 list, one, Delilah winning the two- 
year-old pacing division of the Breeders $6000 Futurity 
and getting a record of 2:16A, the other, Athasham 
winning a stake for two-year-old trotters in straight 
heats in 2:20* and 2:20. 

Zolock is one of the grandest looking stallions that 
ever raced in California. He is an open gaited pacer 
that wears no boots or hopples and can show a fast 
gait at the trot. His breeding is superb. Of his sire 
uothing need be said, as since Sweet Marie 2:04J proved 
herself the greatest race mare ever seen on the Grand 
Circuit, and his list of 2:15 performers became more 
numerous than that of any other sire of his age, Mc- 
Kinney's history, pedigree and accomplishments, on 
the track and in the stud, have become familiar to all 
horsemen. Therefore we will in this article only speak 
of his breeding on the dam's side. His dam Gazelle 
2:11 J was a great trotter and race mare in her day. 
Her sire Gossiper 2:14J was one of the fastest trotters 
of his day and two minute speed was often shown by 
him in his work. In the broodmare ranks Gazelle has 
achieved much. Besides producing Zolock she is the 
dam of Zephyr 2:11, a trotting mare that is expected 
to obtain a record of 2:05 or better this year if no 
accidents befall her. The grandam of Zolock is Gip- 
sey by Gen. Booth. Gipsey has produced Gazelle 2:11, 
Ed Winship 2:15 and the two-year-old Delilah 2:16|. 
Gen. Booth, her sire, had a trotting record of 2:30$ 
and was by the old hero Geo. M. Patchen 2:23$, out 
of Echo Belle, grandam of Conn 2:15$ and a full sister 
to Pink 2:22. Echo Belle was by Echo 462, sire of the 
dams of Dirict 2:05$, Rex Alto 2:07£, Loupe 2:09J, 
Bay wood 2:10.} and several others in the 2:15 list. The 
dam of Echo Belle was a mare by the famous running 
sire Lummox and was out of a mare by old Gray 
Eagle. Zolock's breeding is rich in producing blood) 
and he has not only proven himself a sire of speed but 
of race winners, even though the oldest of his get are 
not yet three-years-old. 

Zolock is to make the season of 1905 at Agricultural 
Park, Los Angeles, in charge of Henry Delaney. The 
fee will be $50 with the usual return privileges. 

Advertising Fairs and Race Meetings. 

Among the interesting topics of discussion at the 
annual meeting of the Indiana State Associations was 
"Advertising." Mr. W. M. Blackstock, of Lafayette, 
delivered a very sensible and practical address on this 
subject. The following extract from his address is 
full of interest to the managers of fairs and race 
meetings: 

"Aside from a thoroughly revised premium list, the 
best means of reaching the masses is through the 
papers. A few selected lithographs to catch the eyes 
of passing travelers are necessary, yet the majority 
of persons are more influenced by what they read 
than by impressions from flaming posters. This is an 
age of newspapers, and under our rural delivery 
system newspapers are read in nearly eyery home in 
Indiana. This means of publication is a grand op- 
portunity for the managers to take the masses into 
their confidence. In carefully selected items and 
edited articles bearing upon this question everything 
connected therewith can be explained in an interest- 
ing manner, so as to arouse a patriotic spirit in 
favor of these time-honored institutions. The people 
should be so educated that they will feel a personal 
pride in the maintenance of their county and State 
fairs. Henceforth the power of the press can be 
made a valuable promotor of fair work, for the in- 
fluence of a high-class, widely circulated newspaper is 
incalculable. Public opinion is largely made up of 
what the people read in papers and periodicals." 

Secretary Downing warmly seconded Mr. Black- 
stocks's suggestions in favor of the use of newspapers 
as advertising mediums. He stated that for six 
years the State Pair paid about $4000 a year for posters 
and $1000 for newspaper advertising. Last year $1000 
was taken from posters and added to newspapers, 
with most gratifying results. Mr. Downing announced 
that he had reached the conclusion that newspaper 
space should be used exclusively, cutting out posters 
and lithographs altogether. Messrs. W. F. Hulet, 
Dr. W. F. Myers and Col. David Wallace expressed 
similar sentiments. — Western Horseman. 



More Praise for Tennysonian's Get. 

Breeder and Sportsman: — I notice in your issue 
of January 7, 1905 mention and high praise of the colt 
Captain John by Tennysonian 32549, now owned by 
Mr Stevenson of Victoria, B. C, and as the wriUr 
who commented on the colt above mentioned is a 



competent judge and also versed in horse lore, I beg) 
leave to supplement his comment by remarking that 
I believe that one is perfectly safe in the assertion 
(from what I know of Capt. John) that he is a high- 
class colt, and if he does not make the cracker jacks 
step some this season on the California Circuit, it will 
be because Capt. John does not invade that bailiwick. 

I believe also that one is safe in the assertion and 
prediction that Tennysonian, with proper mating, is a 
coming great sire. The progeny of this horse are all 
finely formed, large, with good bone and the very best 
of action along with the sterling qualities of kindness 
and gentleness which indicates good brain. 

So far there has been but three of the get of this 
horse worked for speed and they are indeed good 
ones. Alice Lee, now owned by Mr. Spreckles of San 
Francisco, that could negotiate a mile better than 2:15 
with very little work, and Capt. John that can show 
a two-minute gait most aDy day. We know of an- 
other colt by Tennysonian now being jogged at Mount 
Vernon, Wash., viz.: Tenelect, a big strapping black 
that is very promising and beautifully gaited. Also 
Mr. Brooker, of North Yakima, Wash., has a three- 
year-old filly that paced a mile last fall at Seattle in a 
race separately timed in 2:18 with only a few weeks' 
work. Respectfully, 

Subscriber 
And long-time reader of your paper. 



The Grand Circuit Dates. 

The dates arranged by the stewards during their 
meeting in New York, January 12th, for the circuit 
are as follows: 

Detroit— July 24 to August 4, two weeks. 

Buffalo — August 7, one week. 

Empire City Track, New York — August 14, one week # 

Readville, Mass. — August 21, one week. 

Providence— August 28, one week. 

Hartford — September 4, one week. 

Syracuse — September 11, one week. 

Columbus — September 18, one week. 

Cincinnati— September 25, one week. 

Memphis — October 16, two weeks. 

There were present at the meeting D. J. Campau of 
Detroitj the president; C. K. G. Billings, Memphis; 
James Butler, New York; C. I Jewett, Boston; C. R. 
Bentley, Buffalo, and Albert H. Moone, Providence, 
the secretary. 

• George Hayt was re-elected presiding judge, and 
Robert N. Newton of Yorkville, 111., starting judge. 

Mr. Newton, who is little known in the East, is well 
known by those who have followed the great Western 
Circuit, where his work in that capacity has been 
highly spcken of. Mr. Newton and his brother are 
engaged in the banking business at Yorkville, and 
the starting of horses, although it has now grown into 
a formidable business with him, was primarily only a 
form of recreation. His first attempt was at a fair at 
Yorkville about nine years ago, when the starter they 
had was discharged after the first day's work for in. 
competency and Sheriff William Taylor of Ottawa 
secured in his stead. Mr. Taylor, for some reason or 
other, did not show up, and there was nothing left for 
Secretary Newton to do but essay the job himself, 
which he did with credit to himself and to the satis- 
faction of the horsemen. The following year he con- 
sented to act in the same capacity at the old third of 
a mile track at Batavia, 111., with the result that ihe 
stentorian tones that could be heard as clearly on the 
back stretch as on the home stretch, brought him 
fame that has steadily grown up to the present time. 
Mr. Newton is of the clean-cut, new school of horse- 
men, and it is likely that he will meet with success in 
his work down the big line. He has already several 
offers for the weeks preceding the Grand Circuit and 
the two intervening weeks at Lexington, so that he 
expects to be engaged uninterruptedly from June to 
October in 1905.— Horse World. 



Another Track for Pleasanton. 

Geo. A. Davis of Pleasanton, who manages the big 
hop yards and breeding farms of the Lilienthal Com- 
pany, is contemplating building a new training track 
at the horse centre. The stalls at Mr. Ronan's Pleas- 
anton Stock Farm are pretty well filled up, and there 
is a demand from horseman for more track and stall 
room. Mr. Davis doesn't propose that anyone shall 
stay away from "the greatest training place on earth" 
if he can help it, so has associated himself with other 
enterprising citizens and, according to the Pleasanton 
Times of last week, will build a mile track just north 
of town in what is known as "the big field." Plans 
for the track and accessary stables have already been 
drawn. The Times says this field, which is just across 
the bridge from tojvn, "is an ideal spot for such a 
track, being perfectly level and well drained and hav- 
ing the kind of soil which has made Pleasanton famous 
as a place to winter horses in. Besides there is plenty 



of room for a great number of stalls, a Cioonouse and 
grand stand such as it is proposed to build. There 
are probably over 100 horses in the State at the pres- 
ent time which their owners are anxious to send to 
Pleasanton, but for which accommodations cannot 
be had. Surveyors have already been at work laying 
off the grounds, purchasers of small portions of the 
adjacent property have been notified to put up sub 
stantial fences, which looks as though large paddocks 
would be laid out for the con venience of the horse- 
men, and operations on an extensive scale may soon 
be looked for." 

Proposed State Fair Grounds. 

The bill appropriating money for the building of a 
State Fair Grounds at Sacramento was introduced in 
both the Senate and Assembly of theCalifornia Legis. 
on Monday last. The bill appropriates $180,000 to be 
paid to the Board of Directors of the California Stato 
Agricultural Society, to be expended on the new fair 
grounds at Sacramento. The bill makes provision for 
the construction of a swine-exhibit building, a sheep 
building, six cattle exhibit barns, six exhibit buildings 
for mules, horses and ponies, a poultry building, a 
dairy building, carriage sheds, stalls for trotting and 
running horses, a. main fence around the grounds a 
one-mile trotting track, a seven-eighths-mile inside 
running track, a grandstand with lower floor for ex- 
hibition purposes, a judges' and a timers' stand, a 
paddock, water and sewer systems and other improve- 
ments. 

The bill also provides for the use, in the same con- 
nection, of the money now in the State Treasury re- 
maining from the sale of the old fair grounds by the 
State Agricultural Society. Of the $180,000 appro- 
priated by the bill, it is proposed that $100,000 shall 
become available on January 1, 1896, and the balance 
six months later. Another bill introduced by McKee 
provides for the deeding of all the property of the 
State Agricultural Society to the State, and appro- 
priate $25,000 to pay the debts of the Society. 

A Little Girl's Pony. 

To THE Editor:— On December 23d [ had a cotillion 
of forty couples at my home. Wishing to have some 
thing unique, and to havt my pet Shetland pcny en 
joy my party, too, I determined to have him bring in 
the favors. "Him" is a white stallion, four years old 
and forty inches high. His name is Billie. I made a 
"harness" for him of red ribbon and had a lead rein 
of the same ribbon. I arranged red roses and red 
carnations for the first round of favors. 

Fixing the "harness" so that the flowers were easily 
put in and just as easily removed, I arranged it all in 
the kitchen and then had Billie led in by a little girl. 
She brought him to the dining-room, then to the 
music room, and then to the hall where we turned him 
around, standing on the hearth of a large fireplace, 
to face the people. I omitted to say that he had red 
flannel shoes on, 

He stood very still while his load of flowers was re- 
moved, enjoyiDg it apparently as much as the young 
people did, getting candy and sugar in large quanti- 
ties. He had as many kisses as if he had stood under 
the mistletoe. 

He is a very intelligent pony and wo have lots of 
fun together playing tag. He may run almost out of 
hearing, but a call of "Billie" brings him to me; com- 
ing up just as close as he can and facing me ready for 
a lump of sugar and a petting. I have another Shet- 
land, a chestnut just as well trained, but I like Billio 
best. 

Helen Moore Cruickshank, 

Plainfield, Union Co., N. J. 

Geers May Retire. 

A Nashville, Tenn., dispatch, dated January 9tb, 
says: Ed. Geers, who reached Nashville today from 
Memphis on a visit to his old home, may retire from 
the trotting horse game after the present year. Mr. 
Geeis is here to buy, if possible, a small farm on which 
he expects to reside, after leavine tho turf. He said: 
' 'I have been with the trotters more than thirty years, 
and now that I am getting old it is about time for mo 
to step down. As I was born near Nashville, it is my 
desire to come back here to live, and if I can get a 
suitable place I will not hesitate in buying it. " 

The annual meeting of the Gentlemen's Driving 
Club of Denver was held on January 7, the election 
resulting in the choice of such of the old officers as 
cared to remain. J. A. Burnett was re-elected presi- 
dent, and J. K. Stuart secretary. The new selections 
were A. S. Donaldson for vice president, and J. M. 
Norman for historian. The other directors selected 
wero J. A. Osner, J. Fred Roberts, M.J. Dunleavy, 
J. M. Herbert, Frank A. Hall and H. R. Guggen- 
heimer. Matinee racing will be resumed at City Park 
as early in the spring as the weather will permit. 



(January 28, 19(5 



Notes and News, m 

Secretary Bentley ihinks of offering a 310,000 trot- 
ting purse for Buffalo. 



Detroit will open the Grand Circuit with a two 
weeks' meeting beginning July 24tb. 

E. E. Smathers has made the first entry in t he M. 
and M. (informal), the gray mare Lady Babble by 

Ansel Chief. 

A French tire, made of silk and i ubber, has recently 
baen introduced into this country, and is said to excel 
the old-fashioned kind. 



A bill appropriating $70,000 toward paying the ex- 
pense of the California exhibit at the Lewis & Clark 
Exposition at Portland, passed the California Senate 
last Monday. 



Trainer John Howell will train and drive Tiverton 
2:04} in his races this year. Howell worked Tiverton 
early last season, but broke his leg shortly after the 
racing season opened. 



Next Wednesday, February 1st, is the last date for 
second payment in Breeders Futurity No. 5. Don't 
miss it. The stake is guaranteed to be worth $7000 
and will be worth much more. 



Zombro will be in the stud at Los Angeles this year 
at $50 the season. We don't know where any breeder 
can get more for his money than by securing a foal by 
the great Zombro 2:11 at that figure. 



The Eastern papers are all saying that the San 
Francisco daily press reporter who started the story 
that Scott Hudson had sold Nervolo 2:04} to W. E. 
Lockwood for $16,000, should have a medal. 



Strathway, the sire of Toggles 2:084, John Caldwell 
2:11} and many other good ones, will be in the stud at 
Pleasanton this year at $50 the season. A more ex- 
tended notice of this good sire will appear next week. 



Chris WidemaDn, of Gonzalef, will send his pacing 
prospect, Joe Robin, and a full brother, also a pacer, 
and a three-year-old trotter by Robin, to Pleasanton 
the 1st of February in charge of his trainer, Cavel 
Roariguez. 



A. Kaul & Son, of St. Mary's, Pj.., will ship their 
pacer, Funston 2:08} by Dictatus, to New York in a 
week or so. He campaigned through last season's 
Grand Circuit, winning four races, being out of the 
money but once. 

John Lance, one of the prominent trainers and 
drivers of Washington, i9 down on a visit to California 
stock farms and training tracks. Mr. Lance raced 
the pacers Helennes 2:14} and Sam Bowers 2:11 on 
the Norih Pacific Circuit last year. 



The next volume of the Year Book will not be out 
until perhaps the middle of March, according to 
latest information. It may get from the printers 
somewhat sooner, but not likely. It will be to all 
intents and purposes the same as the volume issued 
last year. 

Wildbrino 2:19} is now the ltading speed sire of 
Canada. He now has 33 standard performers to his 
credit, his fastest p acer being Capt. Brino 2:07}, and 
his best trotter, Dorothea S. 2: 124. Wildbrino was 
foaled in 1885, sired by Hambrino, dam Molly by 
Wildwood. 

The Utah Racing Association will give a program 
of races on Decoration Day, May 30th. $600 is offered 
for a free-for-all trot or pace and $400 for a 2:20 class 
trot or pace. Two purses of $100 each are offered for 
running races at one mile and a half mile. W. S. 
Jones is the manager. 



A twenty-mile match race was recently pulled off 
between two trotters which traveled the highway 
between Sheridan and Big Horn, Wyoming, a dis- 
tance of ten miles and return. The back trip was 
made by the winning horse In 374 minutes which is 
going some in a twenty-mile road race. 



Col. Walter T. Chester, who compiled years ago 
"Chester's Complete Guide," and was for twenty or 
more years identified with the Turf, Field and Farm 
as an editorial writer, is at Allen Farm, Pittsfield, 
Mass., the home of Kremlin 2:074, where he will be 
engaged for some time in statistical work. 



A car load of select broodmares are being got to- 
gether in Spokane and wiil be shipped to Los Angeles 
to breed to Zombro. When a young stallion can draw 
tradea4istanceof2000 mikt.it is good evidence of 
the high valuation that is placed on his get. The 
young Zombros are .well thought of in Spokane. — 
Portland Rural Spirit. 



Don't lose the chance to get your money back by 
Jailing to make second payment next Wednesday on 
the mare you entered in Breeders' Futurity No. 5. If 
she proves to be not with foal, you can sell or transfer 
the entry and get back all you have paid out. But if 
you fail to pay up February 1st you are out of the 
stake and if the mare does not foal, or the foal dies 
you will ba out your money as well as the value of the 
eolt. So pay up and keep in. 



Unless a compromise program is agreed upon, there 
is going to be some trouble in finding engagements 
for such pacers as Nervolo, Locanda and John M. 
The last named is eligible to the 2:03 class, Locanda to 
the 2:04 class, and Nervolo to the 2:05 class. There 
are a half dozen other pacers with marks around 2:05, 
all made last season, and from the lot a fine field could 
be secured. 

Geo. W. Hughes, formerly of California, who has 
been living for several years past in Oregon, has re- 
turned to this State and is located at Eureka, Hum- 
boldt county where he may handle a few trotters and 
pacers. He writes us that a green pacer a full brother 
to Bolivar and a fine looker, sold at Eureka last week 
for $350. This horse is hardly broken but can show 
close to a 2:15 gait. 



H. D. Brown, of Oakland, who has trained and 
raced several good ones on the California circuit, 
owns a daughter of Sidney Dillon that is attracting 
much attention from those who have seen her at 
work. She is a chestnut, bred by the Santa Rosa 
Stock Farm, and is out of a mare by Piedmont, 
second dam by Gen. Benton. She has already shown 
a mile in 2:18 and for conformation is hard to beat. 



In the Village Farm dispersal sale, which will be 
held by the Fasig-Tipton Company at Madison Square 
Garden, New York, beginning January 30th, tnere 
will be no less than thirty-one animals offered that are 
descendants in the maternal line from famous old 
Jessie Pepper by Mambrino Chief II. Jessie Pepper 
produced nine female foals, and seven of these are in 
the Great Brood Mare Table. Two of her sons are 
producing sires, and she herself is the dam of two 
standard performers. 

F. W. Perkins, of Oakland, who owns the handsome 
and grandly bred stallion Athamax 36927, has been 
laid up with rheumatism all winter, and has not yet 
decided where he will locate bis horse this year, 
although he has received many letters from persons 
who desire to breed to Athamax, and has had several 
chances to lease him. A yearling colt by Athamax, 
out of a Stein way mare was sold recently for $300 and 
he has some very fine looking colts coming two years 
old, that are the oldest of his get. 



W. T. Harris, the well known >-eal estate dealer of 
Oakland has a find in a big gelding by Bay Bird out 
of a mire by Algona that is one of the fastest big 
horses in California. He is 17 hands high and weighs 
1350 pounds, and though seven years old never had a 
halter on until last year. He was 6old by the Haggin 
ranch and tried out in a bakery wagon before Mr. 
Harris bought him, but with two months' work at 
the Pleasanton track trotted a mile in 2:25 very 
handily. For a horse of his size he is a grand looker 
and will shade 2:20 before long. 



The report comes from San Jose that Messrs. F. S, 
Granger of Santa Cruz, and the well known horse- 
man T. W. Barstow of San Jose have secured a ten 
years' lease of the Agricultural Park and Race Track 
at the latter place and will make many improvements 
thereon. Wnile the report states that the lease has 
not yet been signed, the probability is that it will be 
before this item is printed. Mr. Granger is an ener- 
getic promoter who has built railroads and baen 
identified with many big enterprises in Santa Cruz 
and Santa Clara countieF, and Mr. Barstow is one of 
the leading breeders and horsemen of California. He 
own9 the stallion Nearest 2:22, an own brother to 
John A. McKerron 2:044, and has raced several of 
Nearest's get, including Alone 2:01}. We believe it is 
the intention of Messrs. Granger and Barstow to build 
a large number of new stalls, repair all the buildings 
and make the San Jose track the leading training and 
trotting track in California. Success to them. 



Lady Mowry 2:28 by McKinney. 

On the front pages of this issue is presented the 
picture of a daughter of McKinney, owned by Mr. J. 
C. Mowry of Mowry Station, Alameda county. Lady 
Mowry, as this filly is called by her owner, represents 
a cross that has been remarkably and uniformly 
successful — the McKinney-Nutwood Wilkes cross. 
Martin Carter, owner of Nutwood Wilkes, is a breeder 
who is always looking for the best stallions to mate 
his mares with, and picked out McKinney 2:11} to 
breed to his very fast mare Georgie B. 2:12} by Nut- 
wood Wilke9. The result was the pacing mare Miss 
Georgie 2:11} that William Cecil, Mr. Carter's trainer, 
has always considered the equal of any California 
bred pacer that has crossed the mountains to race on 
the big tracks. Miss Georgie had considerable bad 
luck last year, was sick and threw out a curb, but at 
tbat she took a fast record and showed that she is a 
2:05 performer with reasonable luck. To prove that 
the cross works well both ways it is only necessary to 
call attention to Tidal Wave 2:13} by Nutwood Wilkes 
out of a McKinney mare. This horse was campaigned 
throughout the Pacific Coast last year by Mr. I. C. 
Mosber, and for handsome proportions and gameness 
was not outclassed in any company, while it is well 
known that his mark is not the full measure of his 
speed by many seconds. 

The McKinney-Nutwood Wilkes cross is a success 
and Lady Mowry will undoubtedly add much to its 
fame whenever she is raced. Her dam Electress 
Wilkes2:28 is by Nutwood Wilkes, and her second dam 
Electress 2:27} Is by Richard's Elector, so she repre- 
sents the already famous Wilkes-Electioneer cross as 
well. Lady Mowry has been in William Cecil's hands 



during the past season in her three-jear-oid form. 
At the Breeders meeting in San Jose last year she 
was given a time record of 2:28 simply to give her a 
standard record, and shortly afterwards worked a 
mile over the same track in 2:18 and a quarter in 314 
seconds. Cecil has given her but very little mile 
work, quarters and halves being the extent of her 
usual speeding. She is not only a handsome mare 
in appearance, but is a finely gaited and level-headed 
trotter, and is considered by all horsemen who have 
seen her to be one of the best prospects in California 
at the present time. Bein » by McKinney 2:11}, sire of 
the great race mare Sweet Marie 2:04J and out of a 
mare by Nutwood Wilkes 2:164, sire of the great 
trotting stallion John A. McKerron 2:044, she is closely 
related to "the best families" beyond any doubt. 
When William Cecil was asked one day why he liked 
Lady Mowry so well, he answered: "I worked Tidal 
Wave by Nutwood Wilkes, dam by McKinney, sixty 
days early in his three-year-old form, and he stepped 
a quarter for me in 304 seconds and a half in 1:04, acd 
I thought he was a two-minute pacer and think so 
yet. I then worked Miss Georgie, by McKinney out 
of a mare by Nutwood Wilkes, a mile in 2:09 and after 
■ he had gone three races she had all the pacers in 
California at her mercy. I think she was the best 
green pacer that ever left California and believe 2:05 
will not stop her. With my experience with these 
two to reckon from, when I find so much speed 
and class in a mare of that breeding as I find in Lady 
Mowry, I am ready to take my chances with her down 
through the Grand Circuit, and am certain if I do I 
will get my share of the money." 



Answers to Correspondents. 

S. W. Lillard, Davisville, Cal.— The brown stal- 
lion St. Clair 656 was bred in California by Geo. 
Ingles of Sacramento. He was first known under the 
name of Fred Low, and was foaled in 1864. He passed 
to John E. Miller of Sacramento, and became the sire 
of Clay 2:254 and Adalia 2:27. His daughters pro- 
duced Costello 2:24} and Sam Lewis 2:25, both pacers, 
and Richard's Elector 2:25 and Fay 2:25, both trot- 
ters. Richard'6 Elector is the sire of 16 in the list, all 
trotters but two. St. Clair 656 was by the old pacing 
horse St. Clair 16675 and out of a fine looking mare 
called Lady Ross, whose breeding is unknown. St. 
Clair 16675 was brought across the plains in 1849 and 
died in Sacramento in 1864. His breeding is entirely 
unknown 

Western Racing Circuit. 

At a meeting of the prominent track owners in the 
Rocky Mountain region held at Denver last week the 
Western Racing Association, a new body controlling 
seven tracks in Denver, Salt Lake, Pueblo. Tr'.nidad, 
Fort Collins, Albuquerque and Las Vegas, was organ- 
ized. Dates for the coming season were awarded the 
respective tracks. The racing which will include 
both light harness and running events, will extend 
through from May 22d to July 19th. 

Four new tiacks — at Salt Lake, Fort Collins, Albu. 
querque and Las Vegas — have been added to the cir- 
cuit, and the Colorado Springs track has dropped 
from the associalion. 

Tbemembersof the new circuit will arrange their 
stake and purse events for similar classes in order that 
horses entered at any one meeting will be eligible to 
race throughout the circuit. The 2:14 pace and the 
2:24 trot will be on the card of each meeting, except 
that in Denver the trot may be lowered to 2:13 or 2:12 
to meet the conditions peculiar to the fastest track in 
the circuit. As the events at Overland will be graded 
only a few seconds apart, no hardship will be worked 
upon horsemen. Both the 2:20 pace and 2:20 trot will 
be on the Overland card. 

Albuquerque will offer $5000 in stakes and purses for 
light harness events; Las Vegas will put up $2000. 
At the other tracks the stakes will be $1000 and the 
purses- $500. 

In addition to the big spring meeting, Fort Collins, 
Pueblo and Loveland will have fall fair meetings. 

The representatives of the tracks at the meeting 
were J. H. Hammer of Salt Lake, Messrs. Rhoades 
and Gray of Fort Collins, Messrs. Humphreys, Colton, 
Lewis and Stratton of Trinidad, Messrs. Turner and 
Wilson of Pueblo, Mr. McNeil of Loveland, Messrs. 
Wahlgreen and Colburn of Denver. Las Ve^as was 
represented by proxy. 

At the conclusion of the meeting Secretary Wahl- 
green left for an Eastern trip of several weeks' dura- 
tion, during which he will secure horses for the new 
circuit. The dates decided on were as follows: 

Fort Collins— May 22, 23 and 24. 

Albuquerque— May 29, 30, 31 and June 1. 

Las Vegas — June 5, 6 and 7. 

Trinidad— June 12, 13, 14 and 15. 

D enver — June 17 to July 4, inclusive, fifteen days. 

Pueblo— July 7, 8, 10 and 11. 

Salt Lake City— July 16, 17, 18 and 19. 



January 28, 1905 1 



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!| THOROUGHBREDS. || 

Prom Chicago comes news that the Worth Jockey 
Club will throw its support to the Corrigan side and 
against the Western Jockey Club in the fight for 
Middle Western turf supremacy. This will make a 
total membership of at least a dozen in the new 
governing turf body whose birth is expected this 
week. Walter Parmer will come in with his tracks 
at Detroit and Fort Erie and a lively time is sure to 
follow in the country west of the Alleghanies to the 
Rockies and from Minnesota to the Gulf of Mexico. 
From a good source it is learned that if racing is al- 
lowed to go on around Chicago under a new law gov- 
erning such matters, Washington Park will also 
float the Corrigan banner. If no law is passed the big 
Illinois clul) will keep its track closed. Never have 
things looked so dark in a racing way in both Illinois 
and Missouri. In the latter State the repeal of the 
breeders' law has already been asked for in the Legis- 
lature and with the support of Gov. Folk and his 
friends of the administration the present law will 
probably be stricken from the statute-books. This is 
as it should be, for as matters stood last year it was a 
regular comic opera law. The State Auditor issued to 
bookmakers direct (at $5 each per day) licenses to 
carry on their business and he had it in his power (ac- 
cording to the elastic nature of the law under which 
he was operating) to give or withhold to friends or 
enemies the right to operate race tracks an additional 
ninety days. Late last July, Auditor Allen suddenly 
switched to the Cella side in the St. Louis racing 
battle, at the very last moment, and that switch is 
presumed to have cost a pretty penny. Of course it 
is right and proper that the powerspoken of (to allow 
race tracks to run or not to run; should be taken out 
of the hands of "grafters, "but pool-rooms will doubt- 
less spring up all over St. Louis if the breeders' law 
be stricken from the list. Capt. P. J. Carmody has 
again secured the reins of the Union track, purchas- 
ing the lease, etc., late last week for $70,000 and as he 
will go at once into the Corrigan fold and has the 
confidence and best wishes of the Missouri people, can 
win out, and doubtless will. He started right last 
season and there's a good deal in a good send off. In 
Illinois the latest proposed racing law spoken of last 
week has not made much headway and if some meas- 
ures giving relief is not passed at the present sessioD, 
race-track owners will not care to take the chances of 
running and being arrested every time any gambling 
is allowed on the grounds. That racing is nothing 
without the speculative side was demonstrated con- 
clusively at Washington Park last summer, when 
the richest of all American racing and social clubs 
shut down after going but a couple of days without 
wagering. Thomas Clay McDowell, a grandson of 
the Great Commoner of Kentucky, will probably be 
•lested President of the American Jockey Club 
which is the proposed name for the organization 
which Mr. Corrigan is forming. Mr. McDowell is 
a big breeder in Kentucky and raced Alan-a- 
Dale, White Wings and other celebrities in re- 
cent years. Harry Kuhl will probably be selected 
Secretary. He was the first Secretary of the Western 
Jockey Club, too. Racing will be begun at the new 
Panama track, New Orleans, on the 11th of February. 
Several hundreds of horses are already on the grounds 
including the strings of Wade McLemore, Daniels 
Bros., TJ. Z. DjArman and other big owners that 
raced at Union Track, St. Louis, last season. That 
the Corrigan side has the largest following cannot be 
gainsaid, but the racing clouds hovering over Illinois 
and Missouri look exceedingly dark at this writing 
and the proverbial silver lining cannot be discerned. 



The racing at Emeryville since I last wrote has been 
decidedly flip-floppy from tho form-studont's angle. 
On the 20th Captain Forsee (which had been unplacc d 
for Bullman) won a fine race for Bell, whiie Saturday 
Acaelita and Elliott, two favorites ridden previously 
by the once noted rider, came out and won in most 
impressive fashion, causing a whole lot of conversa- 
tion anent Bullman's saddle work. Monday there 
were some painful upsets, the chief being those of The 
Reprobate (beaten by Edrodun) and Pelham (defeated 
by Salable). However, the latter is a much improved 
youngster and liable to beat anybody's good colt from 
this ti me forth. Tuesday, in the race Educate won 
Hipponax (which had won pulled up in his previous 
race) failed to finish better than fifth, and in the very 
next race Del Carina wound up fourth in a race where- 
in she was a favorite at 11 to 20. Of course, surprises 
will occur on slippery tracks, but it has been in this 
shape so long that a good line ought to have been 
secured on the mud-runners. 



ning hereabouts. Last Tuesday he defeated a fine 
field at seven furlongs, it including San Nicholas, Ish- 
lana and Venator. Gateway is by the big Darebin 
horse, Del Paso, and the only other Del Paso out that 
I remember was Dal Carina. All of which indicates 
that Del Paso is likely to make quite a sire of racers, 
especially those with a love of a soft, slippery or dry- 
ing-out course— in short, any kind of mud. 

Among the recent arrivals from Los Angeles are 
strings of racers belonging to James Blute and James 
Curl, both of w bich made their first appearance of the 
season last Wednesday. Mr. Blute sent Sais, Cincin- 
natus and Tramotor, while Mr. Curl sent along Fran- 
gible and Erne, mud-eaters that do not have much of 
a chance to shine at Los Angeles. 



Gwynn R. Tompkins, prominent as a trainer of 
jumpers around New York, is a late addition to the 
ranks of visitors hereabouts, while W.B. Sink Jr. 
arrived early in the weeJc from France and greeted his 
friends on all sides. He speaks highly of the French 
turfmen and horses, and will return in less than two 
weeks' time. A recent purchase by Mr. Sink is a 
jumper, with which he expects to win the Grand 
Steeplechase. Ralph H. Tozkr. 

Improvements at Napa Stock Farm. 

A. B. Spreckels will make some extensive improve- 
ments in the near future at his big stock farm south 
of Napa. The dwelling there, which is occupied by 
Superintendent and Mrs. George Berry and which 
has stood for so many years that its usefulness and 
comfort havebeen greatly impai-ed, will be torn down 
and a handsome and substantial structure will be 
erected in its place. Mr. Spreckels' architect was up 
from San Francisco the other day with the plans of 
the proposed building, making an investigation of the 
site. The new dwelling will be modern and up-to-date 
in every particular, ar.d will contain fifteen rooms. 
Work upon it will be begun very soon. 

Mr. Spreckels will also replace the stables near the 
house with new and more commodious ones. The old 
structure will be moved back and will be used as a 
wing of the new one. 

In order to make the trip from San Francisco to 
his farm quickly and without regard to train time 
schedules Mr. Spreckels is having constructed in San 
Francisco a launch with an engine of forty-horse 
power. This will be installed at the Spreckels' wharf 
balow Napa, and will churn its way to the metropolis 
for Mr. Spreckels whenever he desires to come to Napa 
on business or for an outing, or both. — Napa Register. 



New World's Record for Five Furlongs. 

A world's record made at the old Bay District track 
has been wiped out. In 1895 George F. Smith, with 
100 pounds in the saddle, ran five furlongs on a circular 
course in 0:59. This record has stood for ten years, 
but last month, at Auckland, New Zealand, a four- 
year-old bay horse, Machine Gun, eclipsed all previous 
records by running the distance in the phenomenally 
fast time of 0:58, which was a second faster than the 
previous world's record. 

The feature of the wonderful performance is that 
Machine Gun carried the extraordinary impost of 
159 pounds. It was in the Randolph handicap that 
Machine Gun broke the world's record. The same 
horse also won the Electric Plate. 

Machine Gun is a son of Hotohkiss, of the famous 
Musket family. He was bred by George G. Stead, the 
J. B. Haggin of the New Zealand turf. The Musket 
family contains many stars of the turf, including Car- 
bine, who won the Melbourne cup with 145 pounds in 
the saddle. The best Musket representative ever 
brought to America was Maxim. — Chronicle. 



Gateway is one of the most improved horses run- 



Should Be a Pony Sire. 

Mr. J. R. Wilson, owner of that grand little stallion 
Royal Flush, has acceded to the demands of many 
breeders who wish to send mares to his horse with 
the idea of raising polo ponies, and will ship him to 
some point near San Francisco within a few days — due 
announcement of the location selected to be announced 
through the columns of this journal. Royal Flush is 
less than fifteen hands high, but is a powerfully built 
horse and a sire of winners. Mated with small polo 
mares of the right conformation he should produce 
ponies that will make the bery best of polo and racing 
ponies. 

Pony Races Postponed. 

Secretary Robert Leighton writes us that in conse- 
quence of the inclement weather and con equent dan- 
gerous condition of the triick for racing purposes, 
the races of the California Polo and Pony Racing 
Association, scheduled for Saturday next at San 



Mateo, have been postponed for one week and will be 
held on Saturday, Feb. 4th, weather permitting. 

The officials of this association have been granted 
the use of Ingleside track for February 22d and will 
give a fine program of racing for that day, including 
a two-mile steeplechase over the course through the 
field. This race will be open only to hunters that 
havebeen ridden with the drag hounds of the San 
Mateo County Hunt, and the minimum weight will 
be 160 pounds. 



The World's Largest Horse Range. 

Stretching for 200 miles on the north side of the 
Columbia river, from a point opposite the Dallas, Ore., 
away toward the Big Bend in Washington, lies the 
largest exclusive horse range in the United States. 

In this great expanse of variegated hills, prairies 
and sand duns, upland plateau and river bluffs range 
the holdings of the Switzlers— John aDd "Jade"— 
numbering 11,000 head of horses. 

For the past thirty years this expanse of country 
has been the range of the Switzlers, formerly William, 
John and Jade. In 1883, William died, and the two 
other brothers continued in partnership for several 
years, when they divided, and each now conducts his 
own interests. 

Jade Switzler lives a; Expansion, Klickitat county, 
Washington, twelve miles below the town of Umatilla, 
on the north side of the Columbia. John Switzler 
lives on Switzler's Island, in the Columbia river, near 
the town of Umatilla. 

Jade Switzler owns 4000 head of horses and John 
owns 7000 head, the range for both these immense 
herds being in the territory from the Dallas to the 
Big Bend. 

At the highest time of the Switzler holdings, before 
William Switzler died, the brothers owned at one 
time 15,000 head of horses. This was said to be the 
largest herd of horses ever owned by one company in 
the entire United States. The Switzler brand, an "S" 
on the hip, was known from the Atlantic to the Pacific 
Ocean, as they shipped and drove horses to every 
known market in the United States. 

In the early history of the Switzler horse industry 
the holdings were cayuses — small, hardy, incorrigible 
pinto and buckskin mustangs— the hardiest brand of 
equines that ever trailed behind the cattle herds from 
the Pacific Coast to Cheyenne in the early days or 
that followed an Indian trail over the precipitous 
mountains of the inland empire. 

But the cayuses are now entirely weeded out. The 
Swiizlers sold 7000 head of these wild mustangs to the 
Linnton cannery at a contract price of $3 per head, 
delivered. Since that clean-up the class of horses 
raised on this immense range has been greatly im 
proved. Large draft stallions have been crossed with 
the wiry, nervy Western mares, and the result is a 
grade of horses weighing from 1000 to 1200 pounds, 
that are fit for any ordinary service, and bring the 
highest price in every market. About 600 stallions 
are kept. 

On this 200 miles of range this 11,000 head of wild 
horses reign monarchs of all they survey. The 
Columbia and Yakima rivers are their watering 
places, they run over pans of three large counties, 
and there are colts on the ranges two and three years 
old without brands and were perhaps never seen by 
one of the Switzler herders. 

Round-up corrals aro built about ten miles apart 
over this great range, and the fifty men employed in 
the round-ups gather and brand the colts in the 'all. 
The two brothers own about 200 head of trained 
saddle horses — a large drove of horses in itself. 

None of this great herd is oven fed a particle of feed 
during the winter season, the sand hills and rolling 
prairies alTording sufficient nutritious feed the year 
round. 

Settlers are crowding the vast range. Watering 
places are being fenced up, and slowly the great ex- 
panse is narrowing down, but there yot remains an 
empire in extent. 

Horse stealing is more or less prevalent in the 
Switzler range, the very magnitudo of the business 
making it impossible to guard against renegades from 
the outside who slip in and appropriate what they can 
safely take away. 

The domand for the Switzler horses is constantly 
growing. This season Minnesota buyers have sent 
out three large shipments of wild horses at $20 per 
per head, delivered at the yards at Kennewick, and 
the class of the younger horses is being constantly im- 
proved . — Philadelphia Inquirer. 

Great activity is reported from the horse market in 
National Stock Yards, 111. Receipts since the first of 
the new year have been large and yet values have 
advanced fully $5 per head on all recognized classes of 
market animals. Best business has been done in 
smooth chunks of good weight, heavy d rafters, ex- 
presses and carriage horses, though even the small 
Southern sorts are reported somewhat dearer to buy. 



[January 28, 1905 




ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Conducted by J. X. De WITT. 



Coming Events. 



Bod. 

Jan. 1-July 1— Close season for black bass. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 18-Feb. 1— Open season for taking stoel- 
nead In tidewater. 

Aug. 15-Aprll 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Sept. 1-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Sept. lo-Oct. 16 -Close season In tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide- 
water. 

Nov. 1-Aprll 1— Trout season closed. 
Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Gun. 

March 5— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
sage hen. 

Oct. 15-Feb. 15— Open season .'or quail, ducks, etc. 
Nov. 1-July 15— Deer season closed. 

Bench Shows. 

Jan. 24. 36 Rhode Island Kennel Club. Providence, R. I. H. 
M. French, Secretary. 

Jan. 25, 28— National Fanciers and Breeders Association. 5th 
annual show. Chicago. W. K. L. rules. T A. Howard, Superin- 
tendent. Chicago, Ills. 

Feb. I, 2— Collie Breeders' Association. Inaugural show. Chi- 
cago. L. A. Woodward, Secretary. 

Feb. 13, 16— Westminster Kennel Club. New York City. Robt. 
V. McKim, Secretary. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb. 21, 24— New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass. Wm. B. 
Emery, Secretary. H E. Gero, Show Secretary. 

Maroh 2, 3, 4— Colorado Kennel Club. Denver, Col. John David- 
son, Judge 

March 8, 11— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred'k S. Stedman, Secretary. 

March II, 24— Buffalo Kennel Club, Seymour P. White, Secretary. 

March 29-Apr. 1— Long Island Kennel Club. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jos. M Dale, Secretary. 

April 19, 22— Atlantic City Kennel Club. Atlantic City, N.J. 
Thos. H. Terry, Secretary. 

May 10, 13— San Francisco Kennel Club show. Mechanics' Pa- 
vilion, San Francisco. 

Field Trials. 

Jan. 16— United States Field Trials Club. Grand Junction, 
Tonn. W. B Stafford, Secretary-Treasurer, Trenton, Tenn. 

Oct. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January I, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 



Consolidation ot Coast Dogdom. 

As already stated in the Breeder and Sports- 
man there has been an effort made to bring about a 
re-union between the A. K. C. and W. K. L. factions 
on the Coast. After considerable diplomatic sparring, 
back and forth, the W. K. L. leaders intimated a 
willingness to come into the A. K. C. fold, providing 
that certain concessions would be made. These con- 
cessions were submitted to the Pacific Ad visor y Board 
and considered at length by that body. The result of 
that consideration and as given in full below, was 
transmitted to the W. K L. magnates. At a W. K. 
L. meeting held in Portland on the 14th inst. the A # 
K. C. "revised" concessions were submitted and after 
discussion certain alterations as noted below were 
made in the document and a committee of three ap- 
pointed by President Julius Redelsheimer with in- 
structions to confer with the A . K. C. representatives 
regarding the changes made in the terms submitted 
by the Advisory Board. 

A comparison of the two documents will show quite 
a little difference in views. The Pacific Advisory 
Board will not consent to change the personnel of its 
present organization. The suggested representation 
for the various show giving clubs is a good move in 
the general interest of Coast dogdom. In filling a 
vacancy on the board the A. K. C. suggest an 
"appoved" selection, for confirmation by the A. K. 
C. The W. K. L. request is that choice of one person 
be made by the Board and final approval should b« 
made by the New York authorities. 

The Advisory Committee states specifically thatthe 
seven members of the board shall be residents of San 
Francisco or its vicinity — the W. K. L. proposal on 
this score is that the seven members must be residents 
of the "city" in which the board meets, or its 
immediate vicinity. The Pacific Advisory Board will 
not agree to a possible change of headquarters for the 
contemplated board. 

The Body of Representatives provided for is an idea 
that will no doubt be of benefit to the clubs interested, 
but there is here shown the same divergence of agree- 
ment as indicated in Section 1 of each document. 

The final clause of the W. L. K. revision is some- 
what in the nature of capitulation with full honors of 
war. What there is behind it we are not advised, we 
trust, however, that this clause may, in the interest 
of amity and fanciers' good fellowship, be striken 
out. It will also be noticed that the sterner sex are to 
officiate exclusively. 

The papers above referred to are as follows: 

REVISED CONCESSIONS MADE BY THE PACIFIC AD- 
VISORY BOARD. 

Section 1, Pacific Advisory Board— The Pacific 
Advisory Board shall consist of seven members, five 
of whom shall be the present members of the Board. 
Three members shall be nominated by California 
clubs, two by the Oregon clubs and two by the Wash- 
ington clubs, in the manner specified under Section 2. 
Body of Representatives. 



The nomination for the two additional members 
shall be sent to the Advisory Board in the manner 
specified for filling vacancies, and if approved, to the 
A. K C. for confirmation. On confirmation by the 
A. K. C. of these nominations, the nominees shall take 
their seats on the Advisory Board, and this new 
Board shall have all the powers and privileges of the 
old. 

In the event of the death, resignation or expulsion 
of any member of the Advisory Board, the Body of 
Representatives shall at once meet and shall send the 
names of three men, whom it would suggest to fill the 
vacancy, to the Advisory Board. The Board shall, if 
approved, select and transmit to the A. K. C. one of 
these names for confirmation. 

In order to secure a working Board and be assured 
of a full representation at meetings, the members of 
the Board must be residents of San Francisco or its 
immediate vicinity. 

Section 2. Body of Representatives — The Body of 
Representatives shall consist of a delegate to be 
chosen annually, from each show-giving club a mem- 
ber of the A. K. C. By a "show-giving" club is meant 
any club holding all breed shows. 

This Body of Representatives shall hold its first 
meeting in San Francisco and nominate by ballot two 
men as new members of the Advisory Board in the 
manner specified for filling vacancies on said Board. 
These nominations shall be sent to the Advisory 
Board and the two names approved by them shall be 
forwarded to the A. K. C. for confirmation. The 
The California clubs shall select and nominate three 
members of the Ad visory Board to represent them; 
the Oregon clubs, two members; and the Washington 
clubs, two members. 

This Body of Representatives shall be officially 
recognized by the Advisory Board and shall be em- 
powered to hold meetings at such times and places as 
it may see fit, and to make such recommendations and 
suggestions to the Advisory Board as it may think 
desirable. 

CONCESSIONS AS ALTERED BY THE WESTERN KEN- 
NEL LEAGUE. 

Section 1. Pacific Advisory Board. — The Pacific 
Advisory Board shall consist of seven members, * * 
*****, three of whom shall be nominated by 
the California clubs, two by the Oregon clubs, and 
two by the Washington clubs in the manner specified 
under Section 2, Body of Representatives. 

These nominations shall be sent to ****** 
the A. K. C. for approval. 

On approval by the A. K. C. of those nominations, 
the nominees shall take their seats on the Ad visory 
Board, and this new board shall have all the power 
and privileges of the old. 

In the event of the death, or resignation, or ex- 
pulsion by the A. K. C. of any member of the Board, 
the Body of Representatives shall at once meet and 
shall send the names of three men, whom it would 
suggest to fill the vacancy, to the Advisory Board. 
The Board shall, * * * * select and transmit to 
the A. K. C. one of these names for approval. 

In order to secure a working Board and be assured 
of a full representation at meetings, the members of 
the Board must be residents of the city in which the 
Board meets, or its immediate vicinity. 

Section 2. Body of Representatives. — The Body of 
Representatives shall consist of a delegate to be 
chosen annually, from each show-giving club, a mem- 
ber of the A. K. C. By a "show-giving" club is 
meant any club holding all breed shows. 

This Body of Representatives shall meet in San 
Francisco and nominate by ballot seven men as mem- 
bers of the Advisory Board. 

The California clubs shall nominate three, the Ore- 
gon clubs two, and the Washington clubs two mem- 
bers. These seven nominations shall be sent to the 
A. K. C. for approval. 

N. B.— In event of the A. K. C. and the W. K. L. 
agreeing to above altered concessions or such substi- 
tute therefore as may be further agreed upon by the 
A. K. C. and W. K. L. the American Kennel Club will 
agree to accept as members all W. K. L. Clubs apply- 
ing for membership and will not discriminate against 
any club or clubs. 

The Sheepdog as a Comrade. 



left a hundred or two racing far ahead and away from 
us. 

How different it is when we send old Tweed. At a 
sign he is gone, swift and silent, like a ghost into the 
dusty twilight. There is no anxiety now. Sitting 
back in the saddle we whistle gaily to our flock, 
knowing that, come what may, the old dog will go to 
the very end of the stringing line, aye, and a little 
way beyond it, to be sure of missing no stragglers 
that have gone forward. When he turns them it is 
silently and slowly, no rush, no hurry and no barking. 
Still more is his value recognized when we are driving 
a small lot of sheep, say three or four. How widely 
he runs! What a watchful eye and nimble foot! Every 
move of his racing charges is met at once, almost 



It is a generally acknowledged fact among those 
who are in touch with the work that a man is useless 
among sheep without a good dog. All of us who have 
handled large lots of sheep know the feeling of con- 
fidence that is inspired by the presence of a reliable 
favorite at our horse's feet. On the other hand, the 
feeling of constant anxiety and apprehension when an 
incapable or unreliable dog is with us. Far away 
through the dust clouds melting into distance the 
leading sheep are running; we sent out our newly 
purchased or half broken Sheepdog to head them- 
Will he split them? Will he worry them? We fidget 
and fret in the choking dust, and if we could leave 
the laggards for a moment, would gallop forward our- 
selves to see, but we must attend to our part of the 
contract and trust to the pup to do his. Presently 
there is a rush and a scramble, and the leading sheep 
are flung back upon the laggards to the accompani- 
ment of much noisy barking — and we are left in in- 
deoision as to whether Larry has turned them all or 



. .Jem on 

before; drops like a flash to our lifted hand, swings 
wider to a wave of our arm, and finally almost says to 
us with happy, shining eyes: "Good! They'rein!" 
when the hurdle is drawn behind them. 

But the insufficiently trained dog knows nothing of 
this Napoleonic strategy; this rule of three is further 
than he has gone in his mathematics, is beyond the 
scope of his knowledge. He barks, he runs too close, 
he splits his mob of three into three mobs; gets angry 
and "wools" them, loses his head altogether, singles 
one sheep out and heels and worries while we curse 
him by all the gods of the golden fleece and threaten 
him with whipcord and noose. 

Such is the difference between the good dog and the 
bad; a difference that is meagerly represented by a 
a few paltry dollars in price, but the difference to us 
between comfort and constant anxiety, between our 
efficiency and incapacity as shepherds and drovers 
and men to be trusted with stock. So it is that a 
good dog is of value above rubies, that fabulous sums 
have been asked for him and refused; that in some 
cases he is beyond the purchasing power of "love or 
money. " 

As regards Sheepdogs, the experience of the writer 
is mostly confined to the brilliant, brainy Collies of 
the Scottish border and to the Kelpies and Barbs of 
the Australian sheep stations. The Collies are the 
scholars among workers of sheep, the experts, the 
professors; their erudition, their knowledge and their 
application of it is superb. Not only are they masters 
of finesse in their art, working with such intelligence 
that almost untold they will shoulder a strange sheep 
out of their flock, but they are full of resource and 
forethought, full of that initiative which is so neces- 
sary in the misty Cheviots where for a considerable 
time when gathering their black faced charges they 
are beyond sight, and even hearing, of their masters. 

"The bit doggie kens!" is the motto of the hill 
shepherds, and there is present between dog and 
master the closest sympathy and understanding. The 
tall, broad shouldered "herd," with the plaid across 
his shoulder and the light step on the heather, has 
learned to look upon the noble beast trotting across 
the hill before him as a comrade and a brother. If 
you have ever watched these men with their dogs 
you will have noticed, maybe with some surprise, 
that they speak to them but little. Yet often they 
will staDd — filling their pipes, perhaps — gazing long 
and earnestly into those liquid and honest eyes, read- 
ing, who knows, what depths of dumbly expressed 
devotion! In casual observation, or in conversation 
with them, one would think they set but little value 
on their faithful Collies. In reality his dog is the 
nearest thing to the hill man's heart. 

When we see these men, returning by rail from the 
market and sheep sales, pushing and kicking their 
tired, obedient Collies under the seats of the railway 
carriages, we can hardly realize that they hold these 
dogs so dear, and that, were the kick or the blow to 
come from anyone else, it would be quickly and 
strongly resented. Yet this is assuredly the case. 

When his owner is thus clothed and in his right 
mind, with a masterful grip of the situation, the dog 
at his command crouches under the seat without a 
protest; but let that master be flung senseless from 
the effects of whiskey into the same railway carriage, 
and the dog at once constitutes himself his comrade 
and protector. No cowering away now; erect and 
watchful he sits up at his master's side, with teeth 
bared and the light of battle in his eyes; and woe be- 
tide the incautious stranger who will lay hand upon 
his drunken charge ! Till the last flocks arc gathered 
and the last grey muzzled dogs are whistled home it 
will never be known how many gallant Collies have 
stood between their masters and robbery or assault in 
the Border towns, or how many have howled through 
the snow wreathod nights on Cheviot, keebing lonely 
watch over those masters in drunken stupor or in 
death' 

In faraway Australia, where they count their sheep 
by thousands and their acres by tens of thousands, 
the Sheepdog is a dire necessity. If his work in that 
country scarcely calls for such fine discrimination or 
intimate knowledge as is required in the Collie, it is 
indispensable that he have courage and speed, intelli- 
gence, and, above all, wonderful and almost super- 
natural endurance. Australia is the land of infinate 
distances, of dusty gray miles of plain, stretching 
away into dark brown miles of scrub, the land of long 
red sand blown ranges and glaring sun-baked river 
frontages. Here all day, with feet blistered by the 
burning ground and torn with seed and burr, the 
gallant little Sheepdogs, with lolling red tongues, but 
keen ears, ever forward to their master's voice, follow 
the cantering horsemen, tireless and indefatigable. 

On the large sheep stations it often happens that a 
man has to ride ten or fifteen miles in the morning be- 
fore he reaches the place where his sheep work begins. 
It is necessary that he reach that point before the 
heat of the day has arrived. With this end in view 
he rides fast through the early morning shadows, 
cantering, perhaps, for five miles, at a stretch, while 
his dog runs away in front of him, startling the big 
brown kangaroos from their early breakfast and set- 



JanuarY|28, 1905 J 



9 



ting the parrots skyward in a red-gray cloud. There 
are sheep to gather and drive a mile or two to the 
yards, there is a long dusty afternoon in the yards 
themselves with the little dog barking, driving, hust- 
ling in the dust, hot and thirsty, but always eager 
and willing. Then, just when the little fellow, foot- 
sore and tired, would give his next day's feed only to 
be allowed to drag himself under a shady bush and 
fight for his breath in the stifling air, the sheep are 
let out, and his master springing into the saddle, 
whistles for him to follow home. Ah ! thoso long ten 
miles ! 

Too many of the stockmen care little what becomes 
of the dog which has worked so loyally and well for 
them through the heat of the day. "He will come 
home all right; he has all night to do it in!" they tell 
you, forgetting, or not knowing, that a dog when he 
is following his master, whether on horse or wheel, 
will follow till he is utterly spent rather that lose sight 
of him. 

But some of the stockmen are thoughtful of their 
dumb comrades. Many a man after a half-mile canter 
says: "Pull up! I must wait for old Rocket! Poor 
beggar, his feet are sore!" Many a one will stoop 
down from his saddle and pick up Jet or Fan and 
carry her for four or five miles on the pommel, to his 
infinite inconvenience and his horse's indescribable 
disgust. 

The Sheepdogs of Australia are all shapes and sizes 
and of divers breeds. Collies and Collie crosses are 
not very frequently met with. The Scottish breed is 
too big for the country, and does not stand the heat 
well. The best Australian Sheepdogs are the Kelpies 
and the Barbs. The former are small black and tan, 
sometimes black, dogs They have the full, broad 
forehead that speaks of brain power behind it, Grey- 
hound quarters that tell of speed, and small round 
feet that stand the greatest possible amount of wear 
and tear. Some are prick-eared and some lopped ; all 
are smooth haired, light and swift, and positive 
marvels in endurance. 

The Barb is a large dog. Perfectly black in color, 
stout and square in build, he, too, has the best points 
of the Kelpie — the broad, almost Bulldog forehead, 
the small feet and the short smooth hair. The Barb 
dogs are all prick-eared and have a peculiar crouching 
and watchful carriage. They, too, are wonderfully 
enduring, though they are heavier dogs than the 
Kelpies. They fight like Japs, and resent a thrashing 
from their master with tooth and nail. This breed is 
supposed to have originated from a black dog, given 
to one of the early squatters on the Gachlan river, t>y 
a black fellow, and is supposed to be related to the 
wild dogs or dingos. Be that as it may, the Barb is 
hard to beat for intelligence, endurance and reliability, 
and all the qualities that go to the making of a good 
Sheepdog. As a comrade he is immense. A Barb 
puppy is the sweetest of playthings. To work sheep 
is his natural inheritance, and as soon as his eyes are 
open he may be seen staggering and stumbling after 
the chickens or the ducks, not merely chasing them 
as a mongrel would, but trying to run out wide as his 
father does, blocking and turning, crouching and 
finessing, but never biting or hustling his drove. 

All puppies are independent, but the independence 
of the Barb is staggering and amazing. He knows no 
fear; he steals meat, and from under the nose of old 
Two-shoes, who is the boss dog bully of the run; he 
tears up the dishcloth of Ned, the cook, whose 
language — and action — when roused is a fearsome 
thing, and he cheerfully nibbles the hair on the fet- 
locks of old Nugget, the draught horse, whose temper 
is vile and whose kick seldom misses its mark. And 
every man on the station loves that irresponsible 
black Barb puppy. 

He grows and fills out; he gains speed and confi- 
dence and the outstanding stamina of bis race. He 
follows his master upon his shorter journej s over the 
run, and learns what it is to have a dry tongue cleav- 
ing to his mouth and a burr stickihg to each foot at 
once. Then he learns the likely places to look for 
water, and how to run on three legs, or even two, 
when the burrs are bad. He rounds up a mob of sheep, 
works them with caution and the innate skill of a 
long pure line of Barbs, and is petted and caressed for 
it; chases a passing rabbit, and, wondering and pro- 
testing, is well thrashed with a double stockwhip. 
And so through good and ill he wins his day to dog- 
hood and its priceless reward — the love and confidence 
of his master. 

The Australian sheepman is proud of his dog, and 
takes every opportunity of telling you so. He has 
none of the reticence of the Cheviot shepherd ; he 
talks to his dog much and often, and of him still 
oftener. He loves to recount his feats of prowess, bis 
wonderful mastery of three sheep, his reliability with 
a big mob. He listens to the tale of his neighbor's 
puppy whose work was so fine that he had lately 
yarded a chicken into a jam tin. "Nothing at all!" 
says he; "the other day I heard something buzzing, 
and found that Barb had just worked a bluefly into a 
bottle! " There is something a little selfish in all 
this. The Australian loves to have the best dog, just 
as he loves to have the best horse. It is hardly in 
this case the deep true fondness of the Scotch shep- 
herd for his dog; and yet in many cases one does find 
that true fondness apparent. 

There is the drover, for instance; the man who 
travels large flocks of sheep across the continent in 
the face of a thousand barriers of drouth and flood; 
this man seta true value on his faithful comrade; for 
without his dog hisliving would be gone. "A good 
dog is worth two men and a boy," is a time-worn 
maxim of the Overland, and many of us have had the 
truth of It driven home in a hundred ways on the 
naked Western plains. With a good dog, there is no, 
"I did not think to look there," or "I did not go so 
far," or "The brute lied down and would not come." 
The dog just makes it its business to go and look or to 
fetch the sheep that staid behind. And that is why 
the drovers cannot do without him, and that is why, 
on the days on which he is not required to work, old 
Tweed travels In state on a cushion of sugar bags 
swung under the cook's wagon; that is why there is 
always a choice lump of meat set aside for him when 



the sheep draw into camp; that is why his feet are so 
carefully watched and tended, and why his weary 
master sits up late by the camp fire trying to fashion 
leather boots for him when the plains are strewn 
with burrs. There is no lack of appreciation here. 
A closer comradeship it would be hard to find; the 
dog dependent on the man for food, for protection, for 
life itself; the man dependent upon his dumb compan- 
ion for reputation and the very means of making a 
livelihood. In do part of the world will you find 
these two in closer sympathy. 

While speaking of the Australian Sheepdog one 
naturally recalls him in his capacity of comrade to the 
swagman, the wandering tramp of the Australian 
bush. A very large majority of these men own a 
Sheepdog of some description as companion and 
guard; very often indeed it is only a mongrel cross- 
bred; in some few cases, especially in that of bone 
fide shepherds out of work, it is a Barb or Kelpie of 
the best type and of superlative wisdom in the sheep 
business. The lonely lives of these wandering men 
bring them to set high value upon their dogs, their 
only companions, and here again between dog and 
man there is a vast amount of sympathy. The 
"tucker bag" is never so empty but there is a little 
bit in the bottom of it for "the pup, " and the track is 
never so dry and the distance to water so uncertain 
but that the man's old felt hat is laid on the ground 
at intervals and a wee drop poured into the crown of 
it for the pup to lap. 

All of which goes to show that not only in the 
squire's hall and the lady's boudoir is the dog a com- 
rade and friend; but where the roughest work of the 
world is done it may be that we love him the best. — 
W. H. Ogilviein Breeders' Gazette. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



S. F. KENNEL CLUB. 

The annual meeting of the San Francisco Kennel 
Club was held on the 10th inst. in this city. The dates 
for the Club's ninth annual spring show will be May 
10th, 11th, 12th and 13th — at the Mechanics' Pavilion. 
Messrs. J. E. de Ruyter, Charles K. Harley and J. 
Love Cunningham will compose the Bench Show 
Committee. Negotiations are now pending in the 
effort to secure the services of a noted English judge. 



WORKING COLLIES. 

The articleon the "Sheepdog" in this issue reminds 
us that the Glen Tana Collie Kennels' puppies and 
young dogs have been in great demand among the 
stockmen and farmers of the Pacific Slope. With the 
number of star brood bitches now in whelp to a 
sextette of the best averaging Collies in the United 
States or Canada there will shortly be theopportunity 
to get some exceedingly good Collies. Mr. Griffith 
has filled demands from New Zealand and Australia 
for dogs of his breeding. 



SABINE KENNELS' STUD. 

We have recei/ed a nicely illustrated booklet from 
Sabine Kennels, Orange, Texas, descriptive of the 
kennels' stud dogs. The stud is led by the well 
known crack Ch. Sabine Result and includes with 
himCh. Sabine Resist, Sabine Recruit, Sabine Ruler 
and Sabine Reynard, a quintette of the best smooth 
haired Fox Terriers on this Continent today, bred on 
the best blood lines extant. For what is offered the 
fancy in this breed, the stud fees and other induce- 
ments to send bitches to Texas, should be a strong 
incentive to take advantage of a good opportunity to 
get the best going in Fox Terrier lines, 

During the comiDg show season, announcement is 
made that Mr. George S. Thomas, will look after the 
stud dogs. Further particulars, and a copy of the 
stud catalogue which we ad vise all Fox Terrier fanciers 
to secure, can be had by addressing Sabine Kennels, 
Orange, Texas. We will suggest to our readers, 
that a reference to this paragraph will be appreciated 
by the manager of the kennels. 



SPOKANE OFFICIALS DISQUALIFIED. 

The initial disqualifications under the rule adopted 
by the Pacific Advisory Board (and confirmed by the 
A. K. C), is the disqualification of the officers of tho 
recent Spokane Kennel Club show — John M. Bunn, 
President; Claude D. Bond, Vice-President; A. B. 
JacksoD, Secretary; Albert Benham and A. L. Cris- 
man, Directors. 

COAST A. K. C. CIRCUIT. 



Besides San Francisco, Oakland and San Mateo, 
there will be Portland and most probably Seattle, 
Spokane and Tacoma in line for the Coast A. K. C. 
shows. 



Ridgewood Doris, the young Fox Terrier with a sen- 
sational career that was purchased by M. Gillette from 
Mr. Georgo Raper for a tidy sum, has recently been 
added to the Wandee string in charge of Mr. Stanley 
Lomas at Stapleton, L. I. Doris will be seen at the W. 
If. C. show. 

Mr. Payne L. Shafttr recently sold to Mr. Chas. F. 
Mullins his well broken and handsome English Setter 
Star White. Star is by Daylight (he by Starlight W.) 
out of Swanhilda. 



Mrs. J. P. Norman had tho misfortune to lose an 
unusually sweet tricolor Collie bitch, Montez Tyche, 
recently — a victim to some miscreant who designedly 
placed poison where Tyche could get it. Tyche, 
although a bit email in size was an extremely good 
type of Collie, beautifully marked and with a splendid 
coat. Sho won at several shows, regular and special 
prizes. 

Cuba II (St. Leonard-Glady 's Glover) owned by 
Mr. M. Coleman, was served last week by W. Wallace's 
crack St. Bernard Ch. Le King (Ch. Le Prince- 
Sylvia's Lola). Le King is considered to be the 
grandest headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Cuba won 
second novice at the S. F. K. C. show last year. 



Pollution of San Francisco Bay and Its 
Tributaries. 

Notwithstanding tho statute, which has been in 
force for several years past, prescribing a penalty for 
the pollution of the waters of the State by refuse 
matter from factories, mills, etc., the violation of this 
law is of daily and persistent recurrence. 

Aside from the manifold kinds of damage and In- 
conveniences resulting from the refuse in the bay 
waters from oil refineries, paint workB and other 
sources of the combined nuisances, what particularly 
concerns most of our readers and sportsmen in partic- 
ular is the effect these substances have upon wild 
fowl, fish, oysters and other marine life of benefit and 
use to the community at large. 

The nuisance has been oommented upon in these 
columns repeatedly, and the attention of the authori- 
ties directed to the law violations, but so far there 
has not been any deviation from the illegal practice. 
We believe the Fish Commissioners investigated the 
matter in connection with complaints made against 
the oil refineries at Point Richmond, but what the 
outcome of that investigation was has not been made 
public— at all events the particular nuisance was not 
abated. 

Not long ago private citizens of Oakland caused the 
arrest of a ship's officer who was charged with being 
responsible for the running of oil refuse into Oakland 
creek. This man was convicted after a trial and 
fined 

A tannery owner in Santa Cruz county was arrested 
on information filed by private citizens. The case 
was compromised; the tannery man promised to abate 
the nuisance and put certain machinery in his estab- 
lishment to divert his particular objectionable stuff 
from the San Lorenzo river. In this case the "stuff" 
had annually destroyed large quantities of fish. 

What has been done in regard to objectionable 
matter discharged into the Truckee river at Floriston 
is still a problem. The paper mill people have shown 
by experts that the refuse complained of is not dele- 
terious to fish. Other people, anglers in particular, 
claim, and with a reason based upon knowledge and 
experience, that the paper mill refuse kills fish and is 
decidedly a nuisance otherwise. 

Within the past three weeks several thousand wild 
ducks, canvasbacks and bluebills have been captured 
in different parts of San Francisco ana San 
Pablo bays, the poor birds were so thickly covered 
with slimy oil refuse that they were incapable of flight 
or yet of swimming and diving, Some of the ducks 
and other sea fowl that were taken on the east side of 
the bay, near Emeryville, were helpless by reason of 
coming into contact with sticky, gluelike refuse from 
a paint factory. In Richardson's bay ducks were 
caught by hundreds by men and boys who went out 
after the disabled birds in boats. As far away as the 
Suisun, Sonoma and Petaluma marshes were birds 
found, and frequently shot by hunters, that were 
covered with the nauseous oily substance. Canvas- 
backs and bluebills, particularly the former variety, 
would make for the shore when helpless to paddle 
about and feed or to take flight. The birds after 
reaching land have been seen to make futile attempts 
to cleanse themselves of the slime. In a short time 
their bills would become coated with the stuff and 
their feathers bunched together in tarry tufts. When 
the birds again took to tho water, their plumage 
would not be the waterproof coat of feathers as It 
naturally should be, the down soon became soaked 
with water thus adding additional distress to the 
bird's plight. Ducks in this condition, did not feed, 
in fact could not feed and became in a short time ab- 
solutely helpless. These birds if not captured by men, 
boys or dogs soon dieof cold and hunger, barring those 
that are caught by 'coons, minks and water rats. 

It is well known that fish taken in oily waters had 
a flavor that made them unfit for the table, ducks also 
have been found to be permeated with the unpalatable 
oily taste. 

While the effects on wild fowl, particularly those 
varieties that seek the salt water sections, is not in- 
considerable, this injury to the commonwealth, which 
has evoked strong denunciation from sportsmen and 
fair minded citizens, is not to be compared to the 
damage accruing to the food fishes of our bays. 

There is no body of salt water in the world so pro- 
lific, as a breeding ground and producing water, In 
its supply of food fishes. The wonder Is that this 
originally enormous source has stood without a 
greater shrinkage, that has lately been so apparent, 
the incessant and wholesale drafts upon our bay 
waters that have been in vogue — legal and illegal — for 
there has been a wasteful prodigality resorted to that 
will receive the deserved condemnation in the near 
future of a community that will feel the effects of the 
present day indifference to so important a matter. 

On the Contra Costa shores of San Pablo bay long 
stretches of marsh grass can be seen sodden with oil 
refuse, from a distance the blackened patches of 
grasses present an appearance as If charred by in- 
numerable fires. 

Tho oil refuse in and about Richardsona bay is 
attributed to the oil barge that pliea between Point 
Richmond and Sausallto. The stuff is pumped from 
the bilges into the bay — this violation of tho law has 
has been noticed daily by Tiburon and Belvedere 
observers as the oil craft was taken through Raccoon 
straits channel. 

Deputy Fish Commissioner Thomas Woods of Oak- 
and recently began proceedings against the Parafflne 
Paint Company,, whose plant is located at Emeryville, 
for tho purposes of stopping that concern from pollut- 
ing tho bay water with refuse from their establish- 
ment at that point. From this particular establish- 
ment the damage dono in the manner alluded to, It Is 
claimed, was particularly noticeable. 

The pollution of the water, particularly by oil re- 
fuse, has beon steadily on the increase for several 



10 



[January 28, 1905 



vears past. The officials of the Fish Commission, who 
We notified time a D d again, and whose duty it was 
to investigate and if possible abate the nuisance have 
been credited with holding the view that the immense 
commercial interests concerned were of more import- 
ance than th^ preservation of public property--i. e. 
food fish, shell fish and crustaceans, to say nothing 
of the direct and unimpeded violation of a law adopted 
expressly for the prevention of this damaging nui- 

8a County officials have the habit, when approached by 
complaining citizens, to refer them to the Fish Com- 
mission for action. District Attorneys, in cases of 
this character, call on the Commission to prosecute 
the offender. It has been very apparent that pros- 
ecutions on this score have been as scarce as hen s 
t eth. , . ■ 

Comparison has ^een made that when a farmer boy 
shoots a dove out of season, a Jap or a Frenchman 
ground sluices a quail or if the unspeakable hide 
hunter is reported to be at his nefarious work — 
several hundred miles away from this city, the 
machinery of the Board is set in motion at once and 
an official representative sent off post haste to main- 
tain the dignity of the law and the prestige of the 
tri-umvirate guardian of the State's fish and game. 
Selah! and let it go at that, even if it does drag a few 
hundred dollars, more or less, from the much be- 
moaned attenuated funds of the Commission. 

And now a word to the sportsmen, individual and 
collective, who have been berating the existence of 
conditions that produce and tolerate the nuisance that 
is patent and equally objectional to everybody. The 
yachtsmen took action successfully In the Oakland 
creek oil nuisance recently. Why not, one or more, 
public spirited sportsmen stop growling and put up 
the necessary money, hire a competent lawyer and 
fight the case to an iseue-the law and the moral sup 
port of the community will back the project to a 
finish If the apathy of the law's representatives 
retards a proper settlement of the matter, eneagetic 
action by private citizens seems to be the only re- 
course—save that of repea ing the statute. 

Game Law Legislation. 

As a result of the recent agitation by the "apostles" 
of protection, there has been introduced a number of 
bills at Sacramento, all more or less opposite in their 
aims— with the one exception, and that is the "pro- 
tection" brand. In the many measures introduced 
there is, of course, a modicum of good. Much has 
been said, by sportsmen, in condemnation of the 
rapacity of the market hunter. To curb the in- 
dividual's game slaughtering propensities and inci- 
dental beating of the present bag limit law, it is 
advocated that the sale of wild fowl be prohibited and 
the individual daily bag be further reduced. These 
proposed measures have aroused strenuous opposition 
from the press of the State and are unpopular with 
the mass of people. In this respect the rank and file 
of sportsmen have been misled by a fanatical, if not 
unprincipalled, coterie of self-appointed leaders in the 
good cause (?). 

The measure advocated by Senator Wolfe is about 
the most sensible effort in this particular that we 
have yet heard of. Senator Wolfe does not, that we 
are aware of, pose as a sportsman or angler nor does 
he make bombastic speeches on game protection nor 
yet write statistical articles for obscure sporting 
papers and Eastern magazines showing how $8,000,000 
worth of outputs from all kinds of factories would be 
st3pped if game protection was not rigidly enforced 
in accordance with the writer's distorted but inter- 
ested propaganda. 

Senator Wolfe's bill provides that market hunters, 
dealers and purveyors of wild fowl shall be licensed. 
That the market hunter must ship his game to mar- 
ket tagged with the member of his license so that no 
more than o?ie limit bag daily can be shipped on one 
individual's license. It might be possible to get around 
the license tag by one individual controlling more 
than one license, this possibility could be overcome by 
an imposition of an individual license in an amount 
that would make it prohibitive to invest, indirectly, 
in many of them. 

It looks as if the outcome of the present game law 
agitation, if successful in certain advocated lines, 
■vould place the main body of the sportsmen of this 
State in the same plight the frogs where when they 
/jhose a stork the ruler of the bog. 

One sentiment gaining ground, and a dangerous one 
'fr ihe reasonable interests of all sportsmen, is the 
assertion by the daily press that the majority of the 
measures "advocated by so-called sportsmen" is in 
tbellneof legislation for a privileged class. This claim 
is not as far fetched as it seems to the sportsmen — 
for much of the changes claimed are practically 
favorable to the interests of a minority of the users of 
the shotgun and rifle in this State. While the changes 
urged may be favorable to the comparative few and 
in the line of game protection for the few, the effect of 
such protective changes will be the parpetuation of 
Its benefits for a favored class. This is not in the 
spirit of the law nor is it reasonable game projection. 
The wild game of this State does not belong to the 
gun clubs, or even to the owners of the land upon 
which it is found. It belongs to the whole people of 
the State and legislation to protect it must be drawn 
in the interest of the whole people. The first essential 
of a just game law is that it should lioar equally upon 
all persons. Whatever restrictions ;i re necessary let 
them apply to all; whatever p^ivilege^ are granted, 
let them be enjoyed by all. 

It was intimated in this journal that at the recent 
game association meeting, at Visalia, much of the good 
stuff touted and eloquently advocated as the real 
thing in game protection was floated for a temporary 
purpose and that the crux of the game law changes, 
produced with the alleged backing of the association, 
w-ould appear when the "apostles" showed their hand 



at Sacramento. Our prophesy has not been un- 
founded, for there are material differences in the 
changes submitted as compared with the much touted 
good things originally agreed upon. The departure 
from original lines is so pronounced in certain matters, 
that sportsmen interested in fair play and the con- 
servation of proper game laws have taken it upon 
themselves to go to Sacramento and combat the 
subtle influences of bad faith in an effort to champion 
the cause of right and the equitable privileges of the 
sportsmen of the State. 



The Anglers' Club. 

A number of enthusiastic devotees of the rod mot 
on Monday evening last and organized the Anglers' 
Club. With the San Francisco Fly-Casting Club, the 
Pacific Striped Bass Club and the San Francisco 
Striped BassClub already in the field and also popular 
organizations, it would follow in most any other city 
that this particular groove was fairly well filled. In- 
stead of that, and assuredly without any reflective 
comparison aimed at the older clubs, we are pleased 
to note that there is room and a welcome place for 
the newly formed club. Its objects are, the advance- 
ment of amateur angling, propagation and protection 
of same fish, the bringing nearer togetherall desciples 
o Izaak Walton and the amalgamation of all lovers of 
the gentle art into one conservative body. 

In this most worthy design the gentlemen members 
of the new club have our best wishes and can rely 
upon the support of this journal in the furtherance of 
the club's aim for the general good it may and can do 
sportsmen and anglers. We wish the Anglers' Club 
every success. 

At the organization meeting the roll was signed by 
60 charter members and the following board of officers 
were elected: President, John H. Sammi; First Vice- 
President, Samuel Wells; Second Vice-President, W. 
Halstead; Secretary, Clarence Ashlin; Directors — 
Jabez Swan, R. Haas, C. Ashlin, Bert Spring, Sam 
Wells, J. H. Sammi, John Butler, George Wentworth, 
W. Halstead and J. Flynn. 

Quarters will soon be secured and it is sanguinely 
expected that the membership will soon be over 100. 



The Shaded Valley. 

The late Leland K. Kerchival, a well known attache 
of the Board of Fish Commissioners, was popular with 
sportsmen of this State. He was noted as being a 
conscientious, fearless and painstaking officer. His 
loss as a State officer is one to be regretted. His un- 
timely passing away was a sad blow to surviving 
relatives and a wide circle of friends. 



Charles T. Baird, the armless shooter, passed away 
in Marysville on January 23d. He was a frequent 
visitor at various gun club shoots and used a "pump" 
gun with remarkable skill considering that Le was a 
cripple. He was but 28 years of age, his demise was 
due to natural causes. 



We regret sincerely to note the reported disap- 
pearance of Horace H. Briggs from his residence on 
Sherman island. Mr. Briggs has not been heard from 
since January 3d. On that day he went away from 
his house in a skiff, the boat was subsequently found 
in the tules on the levee, one oar and an oarlock were 
missing, the only vestige of its last known occupant 
was his coat which was in the bottom of the boat. 

Horace Briggs is well known to the sportsman of 
this Coast as a magazine and newspaper writer of 
more than ordinary abilities. 

We trust sincerely that these lines, presaging dis- 
aster to our friend, are premature. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



QUAIL RESTOCKING, 

The respective keepers of the Country Club and 
Point Reyes Sportsmen's Club will endeavor to secure 
a number of quails that frequent the heavily wooded 
sections of the club preserves, districts that are too 
hard to hunt over. The birds will be liberated on 
other tracts having suitable cover so that by next 
season the birds may have bred numerously enough 
to re-stock the favorite shooting localities. 



A MUSEUM AT PACIFIC UROVE. 

Mr. W. H. Varian, a popular and crack trapshooter, 
who hails from Pacific Grove, Monterey county, has 
recently erected a fine new building in the pretty 
town by the sea and proposes to fit up the business 
portion of the new house in a manner in keeping 
with the increasingdemands of a giowing community. 

Mr. Varian's sanctum will be the repository of 
many beautiful and rare plants and also a collection 
of mounted birds and stuffed animals that Is worthy 
of the attention of visiting sportsmen. 



DUCKS S HU ( h oil 

The Santa Barbara Independent states the following: 
"The Union Oil Company which recently struck the 
big gusher in the Santa Maria field, was not only sur- 
prised at striking oil at the depth at which it was 
found, but unwittingly sprung a surprice on the wild 
ducks which abound in large numbers in that section 
of the country. With oil spouting from the well at 
the rate of about ten thousand barrels a day and with 
no adequate storage facilities, it was necessary to 
construct dams at intervals along the canyon leading 
from the well in the direction of Orcut station and to 
excavate a great reservoir. At present there is a 
reservoir of considerable depth covering a territory 
of about seven acres and it is filled with the product 
of the gusher. Within the past few days, it is reported 



many flocks of wild ducks whose course caused them 
to pass in the neighborhood of the lake of oil, have 
swooped down Into the sticky substance, mistaking it 
for a body of water. With wings and feathers satur- 
ated with the heavy oil few of them were able to make 
their escape. Amusing reports are made of "divers" 
making the same mistake by plunging deep into the 
oil at.d waddlingto thesurface with evident surprise." 

BOBCATS ELECTROCUTED. 

Two wildcats caused every town and hundreds of 
homes in the San Bernardino valley to experience 
total darkness for two hours one night last week. 
Between Ontario and Azusa the romping beasts sped 
up a pole carrying the high tension electric wires of 
the Pacific Lighting Company, got mixed among the 
lines and caused a short circuit of 15,000 voltage. It 
took a long time to locate the trouble and turn the 
current on the reserve wires. The incinerated bodies 
of the cats were found the next day among the cross- 
arms on the pole, where electrocution bad ended their 
frolic. Among the dozen towns which suffered were 
San Bernardino, Redlands, Colton, Chino, Upland, 
Ontario and Claremont. 



A Remarkable Record by a One-Armed Shooter. 

John A. Flick, of Ravenna, O., a one armed shooter, 
and a staunch advocate and admirer of the only gun, 
in his estimation, the "Old Reliable" Parker, has 
done some magnificent shooting with the new auto- 
matic ejector in his hands. At Cleveland, O., Sept. 
28, .Mr. Flick won high general average. Also a cup 
on straight score, beating such men as Upson, Snow, 
LeCompte, Trimble, etc. At the Portage county 
tournament Oct. 4 and 5, Mr. Flick won third general 
average, tying C. A. Young and Hikes, beating out 
all other professionals. On the last day he was second 
high average. Akron, O., Oct. 12, second general 
average, and December 14, high general average. At 
Portage County Gun Club, Dec. 15, hedefended theTri- 
County badge against Mr. Waggoner, of Akron, with 
a score of 93 out of 100, against Mr. Waggoner's 88. 

R. C. Derk of Northumberland, Pa., has been mak- 
ing some remarkable records with his Parker gun at 
live birds. Live bird shooting is the severest test to 
which a gun can be put, and Mr. Derk 's record reflects 
credit on the "Old Reliable" Parker gun. At live 
birds on Aug. 27, Mr. Derk killed 25 straight. On 
Oct. 8, 12 out of 13; Nov. 5, 10 out of 12; on Dec. 31, 13 
out of 15; on Jan. 5, 25 straight, making a total of 85 
out of 90. _ 

Something To Be Proud Of. 

The awarding of the grand prize to the Winchester 
Repeating Arms Company. New Haven, Conn., at the 
St. Louis Exposition confers upon this company the 
highest maik of distinction attained by any manu- 
facturer of guns or ammunition in the world. Al- 
though a great number of medals were given to this 
class of manufacturers, the only award of a grand 
prize was to the Winchester Repeating Arms Com- 
pany and given as it was in competition with the lead- 
ing manufacturers of all countries, it testifies in a 
most decided way to the superiority of Winchester 
rifles, shotguns and ammunition over all other makes. 
The success attained by the Winchester Repeating 
Arms Company at this exposition is simply in line 
with the honors received in the past. At the Paris 
Exposition Winchester arms and ammunition received 
the Grand Prix, and wherever they have been exhib- 
ited they have always been given the highest possible 
prices. This latest recognition of superiority is the 
natural result of 30 years of careful and successful 
endeavor in maintaining the high quality of Winches- 
ter rifles, shotguns and ammunition. 



Good Averages Reported. 



Butte, Montana, in the closing season of the Butte 
Gun Club, Mr. E. F. Confarr, of Livingston, Mont., 
won the Peters medal with the best score of the 
season with a total of 507 out of 550. He shot "In- 
fallible" Smokeless. 

York, Pa., Dec. 22, 1904, A. A. Somers, of Delta, 
Pa , first general and first amateur averages, 175 out 
of 200, shooting Du Pont. R. O Heikes, second 
general average, 172 out of 200, shooting "Infallible." 
L. J. Squier, third general average, 170 out of 200, 
shooting Du Pont. 

Cumberland, Md., Dec. 29, 1904, J. M. Hawkins, 
first general average, 142out of 155, shooting Du Pont. 
H. C. Watson, second general auerage, 135 out of 155, 
shooting Schultze. L. J. Squier, third general aver- 
age, 132 out of 155, shooting Du Pont. W. A. Wiede- 
busch, of Fairmont, W. Va , first amateur average, 
130 out of 155, shooting Du Pont. J. A. Holderbaum, 
of Bradford, Pa., second amateur average, 129 out of 
155, shooting Du Pont. R. S. Deniker, of Ruffsdale, 
Pa., third amateur average, 12G out of 155, shooting 
Du Pont. 

A New Gun. 



The Ithaca Arms Company will put on the market 
this year a new gun — a $20 shotgun that is the biggest 
proposition in the way of a low priced popular shot- 
gun ever called to the attention of sportsmen of this 
country. 

Tne gun will be of good quality and guaranteed as 
are the other grades of Ithaca gun. It will have all 
of the good points of the higher priced guns of their 
make, half pistol grip and smokeless powder steel 
barrels. The Ithaca Field gun is destined to be a 
popular gun if merit and price are any inducements. 



Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold In every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



January 28, 1905j 



©lie g*rcei>er miD ^povt&xnan 



11 



THE FARM. 



Care of Pure Bred Cattle. 




It is plain that some men who buy pure 
bred animals for the farm do not know 
how to take care of them, says Breeder s 
Gazette. Scrub care means scrub ani- 
mals. 

Therefore there is absolutely no sense 
in any farmer purchasing pure bred stock 
unless he has his mind fully made up to 
give it pure bred care. This is very 
much of an old story, but the admonition 
cannot be too frequently repeated. This 
should not discourage any farmer from 
purchasing pure bred animals. He 
should, however, before doing so have 
thought the matter out carefully to the 
end that he may be prepared to care for 
them properly. 

It is beyond question that the gospel of 
good blood has received more persecution 
on account of scrub fed, well bred ani- 
mals than on any other account. Take 
the grandest pure bred cow that ever won 
a ribbon in a show ring, subject her to 
care that would do justice to a scrub, and 
what between the straw stack and the 
barb wire her breeder would not know 
her in twenty-four months; hence the 
point is that no farmer should lightly un- 
dertake the maintenance and reproduc- 
tion of pure bred animals, If he has not 
first studied out the principles governing 
the industry he would far better stick to 
his scrubs and never get beyond them. 

Breed and feed go together. It has 
been under conditions generated by high 
feeding and good shelter that the im 
provement of cattle and other farm ani 
mals has been wrought, and without a 
continuance of such conditions success 
cannot be attained. 

Not long ago a good feed ng farmer sent 
a nine-year-old Shorthorn cow that had 
stopped breeding to the shambles. She 
scaled 1550 pounds and sold for $5 per 
hundredweight, gross intake $77.50. The 
same day thousands of cows were sold in 
the same market, younger or of the same 
age, for $20 and Use, and the cost to pro- 
duce was not greater in one case that in 
the other That is right down on the 
lowest level of reasoning that can be ad- 
duced to strengthen the cause of good 
blood. 

Scab and Mange. 



the disease exists. The Secretary says : 
"I consider it of the utmost importance 
to the cattle and sheep industry of the 
United States and to the maintenance 
of the export trade in live sheep and cattle 
that this diseasa should be completely 
suppressed, and this ran be done with 
thorough work in the course of a few 
years. Any lessening of the inspection 
or the suspension of the work for even a 
short time would be followed by the re- 
nfection of the territory which has al- 
ready been freed from the disease, and 
would undo what has b?en accomplished." 



Sheep Shearings. 



A dairyman said to the editor of the 
Breeder, Field and Farm the other day : 
"When I was a boy, my mother told me 
never to feed a young calf dry meal, but 
like most people I had to lose one or two 
before I knew this for myself. Dry corn 
meal is very indigestible stuff on an old 
horse's stomach, often causing inflamma- 
tion, colic, etc , even when fed with some 
bran. My way of feeding meal, was to 
either bake a Johnny cake or mix two- 
thirds bran with one-third meal and stir 
in a small quantity of sour milk. If a 
small calf is given too much sour milk it 
will become pot-bellied and then it will 
eat and bawl and never do anything else. 
I begin by giving thick milk mixed with 
warmed sweet milk and after the calves 
get used to it, I give them all they will 
drink readily every time and come after 
it. Afterwards I giye thick milk with a 
small quantity of bran and meal mixed. 
Plenty of sour milk alone will raise as big 
a calf as sweet, but will not fatten it. I 
have fed two— one sweet milk from the 
cow, theother thick milk. The sweet milk 
calf did not grow so fast, as the other, 
but became fine veal I have also made 
a veal calf with sour milk and bran and 
meal." 



Secretary Wilson has made a statement 
to Congress asking for an additional de- 
ficiency appropriation of $150,000 for. the 
Bureau of Animal Industry. He stated 
that the inspection of interstate and for- 
eign trade in sheep and cattle has been 
greater than was contemplated, and that 
the diseases mentioned have spread over 
a great part of the West, necessitating the 
inspection of all Western sheep and cattle 
shipped ; also to attempt the eradication 
of the diseases. The exportation of sheep 
affected with scabies, he says, has had a 
bad influence upon ourexport sheep trade. 
In 1902 sheep exports to Great Britain 
were 211 ,000, of which 4900 were infected ; 
in 1903 such exports were 111,000, with 
3G00 infected. The first regulations of 
the department for the control of this 
disease went into effect in 1896. In 1895, 
350,000 sheep were exported to Great 
Britain, of which 89,000 were infected ; 
in 1896, 422,700 were exported, of which 
42,700 were infected, while the figures for 
recent years show a great decrease, the 
Secretary states that the infected sheep 
are much more numerous than four or 
five years ago, and he proposes that the 
government co-operate with the States 
for the complete eradication of the scab- 
ies. The Secretary reports encouragingly 
On cattle mange or scab, to eradicate 
which a vigorous campaign has been made 
during 1904 by the department in co-op- 
eration with the State authorities where 



A contract system of milking is in vogue 
on some farms in Denmark. Women do 
the milking and are paid according to 
the amount of milk they extract from the 
cows or the quantity of butter fat con 
tained in it. The latter system is regarded 
as the better as it induces the milkers 
to strip the cow carefully, knowing that 
the richest milk is in the strippings 
The milkers receive a certain amount of 
money weekly and twice a year are given 
what additional amount is coming to 
them on the basis of the fat contents of the 
milk. 

The loss from careless milking in the 
United States amounts to one tent)) of a 
pound of fat per day for each cow 
Thorough milking and udder manipula 
tion would increase the value of the milk 
given by the eighteen million cows in 
the United States over present production 
by $100,000,000 a year. This is equal to 
five per cent on two billion dollars. That 
is, careful milking would increase the dairy 
capitalization of the country by that 
amount. 

A correspondent of the Rural World 
vouches for the following recipe for curing 
meat. ''To one gallon of water take two 
and one-half pounds salt, one-half pound 
sugar, one half ounce pot sh ; in this 
ratio the pickle can be increased to any 
quantity desired. Boil these ingredients 
together until all the scum rises and is 
■kimmed off. After it has cooled, pour 
over your pork or beef. The meat must 
be well covered with the pickle and should 
not be put down for at least two days 
after killing, during which time it should 
be lightly sprinkled with powdered salt- 
peter, which removes the surface blood, 
etc., leaving the meat fresh and clean. 
If this recipe is strictly followed the meat 
will be unsurpassed for sweetness, deli- 
cacy and freshness of color." 

Any dust or dirt allowed to get into the 
milk will not be easily got out. The sur- 
est way to kill a customer is to hai.d out 
filthy milk. Brush off the duet from each 
cow's udder before milking. It pays. 
o 

Jackson's Napa Soda untangles the 
feet. 



Sheap are always improving or they are 
deteriorating. 

When you buy a sheep for breeding be 
sure it is better than what you have. 

The secret of successful sheep husbandry 
is to keep good sheep and in small flocks. 

Unless there is a continued effort to im- 
prove the flocks they will go backward 
instead of forward. 

In purchasing a ram, get one fully de- 
veloped, strong in limb, straight-shaped 
and thoroughly typical in his breed. 

If a radical change in the rations is 
made too suddenly, growth of body and 
fleece is liable to suffer a check. 

The lamb carcass can be produced for 
leBs than the aged sheep carcass and will 
sell for one fourth more in market. 

Uniformity in wool can only be accom 
plished by regular feeding and keeping 
the sheep in a healthy and thriving con- 
dition. 

Feeders are higher than usual, necessi- 
tating greater care in 1he management of 
flocks, if the profits are to be maintained. 

Wool must grow, steadily and uniformly 
as it will have points, that is, weak places 
here and there that are very damaging. 

Considerable money was made last year 
feeding sheep. Shipments from ranges 
last fall were larger than they have ever 
been before. 

At the weaning time the best opportun- 
ity is given for determining the value of 
the breeding ewes. A large, fair lamb 
is better recommendation than a heavy 
fleece. 

Over-feeding or sudden changes from 
poor to very rich food, combined with 
want of exercise, if not actual causes will 
contribute to the development of the loss 
of wool among ewes. 

Peter Jensen, the veteran sheep-grower, 
advises shippers to put the guant, hungry 
and tired sheep from the ranges on prairie 
grass and stubble fields before feeding 
grain. They need to get accustomed to 
the new surroundings and in the yards 
need hay and roughage in plenty. — 
Exchange. 



tides of impure matter will stick in the 
little cracks and crevices, and that means 
the bugs and other awful things which 
the big folks call "bacteria." And thia 
means poor butter. 



Milk Capacity of a Cow 



A cow, with reasonable care and feed, 
ought to average from five to eight quarts 
of milk per milking at least ten months 
of the year; eleven months is better. 
This average would mean eight to six 
quarts of milk per milking during the 
first months of the lactation period and 
lesa later. From this amount of milk, 
with proper management, from one. to 
two pounds of butter per day should be 
made at first, with correspondingly less 
later 



Dairy Tinware 



The 1905 edition of The World Almanac 
and Encyclopedia has just made its ap- 
pearance. It is by far the best edition 
yet produced, as full of interesting 
statistics as a nut is of meat, containing 
10,000 subjects and 100,000 facts and 
figures. In fact. The World Almanac and 
Encyclopedia for 1905 is the most au- 
thentic year book in print today. Sold 
by all news agents and booksellers at 25 
cents per copy, or sent by mail by the 
publishers for 35 cents. Address The 
World (Almanac Dept.), 49 Pulitzer 
Building, New York City. 

The Department of Agriculture re- 
cently published a farmers' bulletin on 
the subject — No. 179— and it has been in 
high demand, necessitating the rep int- 
ing of several editions, The bulletin 
gives some instructive notes on the struc- 
ture of the horse's foot, the care of the 
hoofs and feet, matter of interference, etc. 
It can b> obtained from senators or con- 
gressmen or the Secretary of Agriculture. 

When a milk can or other receptacle 
has begun to rust the sooner it is put out 
of use the better, says the Farm Journal. 
In spite of the most careful cleansing par- 



A man or woman who handles tinware 
that is used in the dairy ought to have a 
first-class "smeller." That is, he or she 
should be able to detect every odor which 
will taint the milk or injure the flavor of 
the butter and then work faithfully to 
get rid of that taint. Thia ia the one 
thing that muBt be done to make butter 
that will top the market — Farm Journal. 
o 

For a long series of years the horse mar- 
ket has been a succession of ups and 
downs. Since 1903 the general tendency 
has been upward, the price of choice 
drafters in the large wholesale market 
having advanced about $6 on the average 
of sales. Demand seems to have more 
than kept up with the supply, notwith- 
standing the supposed influence if auto- 
mobile carriages, wagons and trucks, 
trolley lines and the like. The high price 
of human labor encourages the substitu- 
tion of horse labor whenever possible to 
any extent. For instance the city (on. 
tractors who are constantly hauling loads 
of earth and rubbish in connection with 
building contracts have lately taken to 
using heavier draft horaes able to haul 
two and three cubic yards of earth where 
formerly one cubic yard was rated a load. 
In this way one driver can haul at least 
twice as much as with a light team or a 
single team. The growth of teamiug in 
cities has been more rapid than the in 
crease in supply of horsea, and this ten- 
dency is likely to continue for some time. 
o 

Buying Cream on Grades. 

Slowly but surely the practice of buy- 
ing cream on grades is coming into 
general use. The system of buying cream 
on grade is one of absolute equity and 
justice to every dairy farmer. Butter fat 
in good cream will sell for the highest 
price. Butter fat in poor cream will sell 
for what it is worth. — Farm and hive 

Stock Journal. 

o 

Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 



FOR SALE. 

Kate McKinney 1!^=^ 

Nutwood, dam of Ole 2:11, Koblet 2:12, Tietam 2:19, 
Maud Fowler 2:2iy (dam of SoDoma Girl), Mc- 
pherson (trial )• 2: 14 and others. Evqllne never 
threw a foal that was not a trotter. Kate Mo- 
Klnney is a perfect bay, absolutely sound, 5 years 
old and only partly broken, but small. Price 
reasonable. Apply to THJS. HONNER & CO., 
1499 .Market St., San Francisco. 



brit He Worth Swing ? t 

Why trade off or sell nt a bepirnrlv price a Rood 
horse just neca use ho "(,"»'* lame," "throws a 
curb" or develops some other blemish? '1 here 
is nothing in the way of Sparing) Curbs, Splints, 
Wlndpuffs or Hunches which will not \ ield 
readily and permanently to treatment « till 

Dr. h. II. Davenport, a prominent physician Of Sheridan . I nd., 
writes* l have a*ed a number of remedies for the removal of 
^ rurbit. ppllnts, thickened tendons and tissues generally, bat for 




t been irlthOUt Quinn's Ointment. I have tested It t li 
, and t»av witho.it ln-sitiine v ( h<* t It is the only reliable reine- 



the last two years I ha 
ouffhly at illlfVrent tinv 

<ly of the kind I have over tried.*' price S 1 .00 per bottle. Hold by nil drtifftrtBt 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y, 




12 



[January 28, 1915 



Goose Culture. 

[A. V. Meerach in American Poultry Advocate] 

Those people who have accees to a good 
grass run, and who are thinkiDg of keep- 
ing geese, probably the most profitable of 
all our domestic fowls, should now (very 
early) make a commencement, if not al- 
readv done so. 

Geese should be procured in the fall, 
because they take such a long while to 
settle down in a fresh place, and to make 
themselves at home. So much in fact 
are they effected by a change of abode 
that if it occurs within two or three 
months of the time when eggs are ex- 
pected, which should be in February the 
probability is, that they will either not 
come on to lay, or if they do, that many 
of the eggs will be unfertile. If a begin- 
ning is made with goslings it is well to 
note that propably they may not lay- 
next year, for geese, as a rule do not 
breed before they are two years old. If 
older birds are preferred, they should be 
obtained from someone who can be re- 
lied upon. 

Though geese live for many years and 
continue productive, there is a limit to 
their powers; and it is no unusual thing 
for those that are offered for sale, to be 
too old for use. Three geese are sufficient 
to run with one gander. 

To ensure the fertility of the eggs, the 
birds require water to swim in. If there 
is no stream or pond available, a good 
sized tub sunk in the ground will answer 
the purpose. 

The stock geese do not require meal or 
other fattening food. They will forage for 
themselves to a great extent by eating 
grass, and a light feed of oats or other 
grain in the morning is all that is nec- 
cessary. 

There are several breeds of geese. A 
cross between the Embden and the Tou- 
louse makes a very large, quick-growing 
bird. If bred from the Embden gander 
and a Toulouse goose, the offspring will 
be mostly white, the feathers more valu- 
able. Stock geese must be large in frame 
and long and deep in body. Small geese 
are hardly worth growing, just as cheap 
to pay a little more and to start with 
birds that will rear large, plump goslings. 

Geese that are sufficiently matured and 
that have not changed their quarters 
since the last of October, will in mo9t 
districts commence to lay in February; 
young geese do not lav as many fertile 
eggs in the first season as they do in the 
second, neither do any geese do well, if 
they have recently been moved from one 
place to another. The stock birds will 
lay for many years, and the eggs will 
prove iertile, while the birds are old. 
Some people keep the same geese for over 
ten years, while there are instances of 
geese having lived for upward of half a 
century. 



Warranted to Give Satisfaction. 

Gombault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
-Curb, Splint. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lameness from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Diphtheria. Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 
As a Human Remedy tor Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, vie, it is invaluable. 

TS-wry bottle or Caustic Balsam sold is 
H iwrfli'ted to (rive .satisfaction. Price $1 50 
ntr-botllu. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
|.r, s ,, <:liarvs p'lid. witn full directions for 
its use. tSTScrtd for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



The best time for goslings to be hatched 
is in March or April. The eggs can be 
hatched under an ordinary hen as well as 
a goose. If they are placed under the 
former, the eggs must be well sprinkled 
several times with warm water to prevent 
the shells becoming too hard. A goose 
will cover from thirteen to sixteen eggs. 
Most geese will sit well, and will come 
off their eggs to feed and return to them 
again of their own accord. The period of 
incubation is thirty days. 

When the goslings are hatched, they 
must be placed with their mother in a 
coop near some short grass. Water to 
drink should be supplied in a shallow pan 
or dish, but the young ones must not be 
allowed to swim; neither should they 
have access to long wet grass, before they 
are at least two weeks old. For the first 
two days they should be fed on bread 
crumbs, after that on ground oats mixed 
with bread crumbs and moistened with 
milk, and at the end of two weeks on 
barley meal Goslings are an ongst the 
hardiest and the most easily and inex- 
pensive reared of all poultry. 

Goslings, for the first week after they 
are hatched will do well on a little oat- 
meal thrown into their drinking water in 
addition to the grass they will nibble. 
Some breeders give scalded cracked corn 
and others hard boiled eggs chopped up 
and bread crumbs mixed with cut up 
greens. After about two weeks, the coop 
which the goose and her goslings have 
inhabited can be removed, and they can 
be allowed to make their way to the 
water and enjoy themselves in it. They 
will after this grow at a rapid rate. The 
supply of grass, must always be ample 
and there must be an opportunity for the 
young birds to get into the shade or they 
*ill be liable to be affected by the heat of 
the sun. If they can be turned out later 
on, into the stubble field getting as 
much grain and weeds as they can eat, 
they will add three or four pounds to their 
and be in good condition for killing. 

They are called "green geese." But if 
they are not killed after this good feeding 
on the stubbles they will lose weight for a 
time and become thin, if only allowed 
grass to eat. 

And as to geese in the fall I shall say, 
that when commencing to keep geese, it 
is not desirable to move the birds as al- 
ready explained herein, after the end of 
October or the beginning of November, as 
they take so long to get over the 
move and to settle comfortably in fresh 
quarters, that if it occurs within three 
months of the time when eggs are usually 
expected, the probability is, that the 
geese will not come on to lay. They even 
breed better the second season after they 
have been on that particular land than 
they do the first, which shows that any 
change disturbs them and that they do 
not make themselves thoroughly at home 
for some months to expire 

As before said, if young geese are chosen 
to begin with, it may be found that they 
do not lay until the second season, or if 
they do the eggs generally do not hatch 
Purchasing old geese, caution is neces- 
sary, and as owners are not always will- 
ing to part with well bred and profitable 
birds, it as well to go to some one who 
can be depended upon. There is no way 
of telling geese that are fifteen years old 
from those that are only three. Many 
people, including those who are accus- 
tomed to have to do with geese, are un 
able to tell a gander from a goose. One 
of the simplest ways to tell this is to 
note the voice. After the gosling are 
twelve weeks old, their voices "break," 
when the gander may be recognized by 
his shrill and clear note, while that of 
the goose is deeper and lower in pitch. 
This may be specially heard, when they 
will call to one another. The gander can 
also be distinguished by his upright 
carriage and by his being more watchful 
and alert than the goose. 

Geese that are intended for stock pur- 
poses do not require special feeding; they 
need only to be maintained in good, 
healthy condition, and this will be done 



if they have plenty of exercise and access 
to unlimited grass. A slight feed of oats 
before dusk may be beneficial. Geese are 
killed at two periods: as green geese, 
when they have attained a size large 
enough for the table, and after they have 
reached their full growth. The flesh of 
the green goose is considered more ten- 
der and of better flavor than that of a 
matured bird that is prepared for Thanks- 
giving or Christmas eating. A gosling at 
the age of about twelve weeks is fit to 
kill as a green goose. Most growers give 
the young birds soft food, after they are 
six weeks old, and oats as hard grain, 
with plenty of grit in the water trough. 
After this treatment they are excellent 
eating when three months old. Young 
goslings when killed, must be plucked 
very carefully as their skins are so ten- 
der and easily broken. The heretofore 
mentioned cross between the Embden 
and the Toulouse is very well suited for 
killing as green geese, in fact this cross is 
as good as any fowl for all purposes, as 
the young birds develop into large geese, 
which are free layers of fertile eggs. They 
are also good sitters as well as mothers. 
It is necessary when keeping geese that 
they should have access to water. If a 
pond or a stream is not within reach, 
some convenience must be made to pro- 
vide a swim for them or the eggs may not 
or will not be fertile. 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 



Always churn just as soon as there is 
cream enough and sufficient acidity 
develops. If cream is held beyond this 
it will be injured. 



The Holsteins. 



Norman J. Coleman was interviewed in 
Washington the other day and said : "If 
I was to single out one particular im- 
pression I should have to speak of the 
prominence into which the Holstein cattle 
are now coming. The Holstein, you know, 
is emphatically the all-service animal for 
our American farms. There is a rare 
combination of the milking superiority 
with beef production. These cattle 
mature early and they put on flesh with 
great rapidity. 

"Wherever I went I found the show 
of Holsteins one of the great features, 
and they seemed to attract more atten- 
tion from the average farmer than the 
other classes. 

"Of course, the Jersey, for small places, 
has its sphere as being economical and 
giving rich milk The Shorthorns are 
without superiors as beef cattle, but 
between these extremes there is a wide 
field for an all-service and the Holsteins 
seem to meet that want. The Devons 
are good milkers and good beef cattle but 
they are slow maturing. Farmers seem 
to think Holsteins come nearer what they 
have been looking for, and everywhere I 
found the Holsteins attracting a great 
deal of attention." 



It is not a good plan to put night's 
milk and morning's milk together if it 
is designed to raised cream. It is better 
to set them in separate shallow pans. 



Sponges. S. Adderly, 307 Market St. 



MALtt 



3PAV/JV 
CURE 



Townsend Center. Mass. 

Dec. V. 1903. 
Dr. B. J. Kendall Co. 

Gentlemen — Having your rem- 
edies in my -JtaUe for over t years 
1 would say that I find none equal 
them in curing lameness and 
bruises. Please send me one of 
your "Treatise on the Horse and 
his Diseases. "ALUfcRT KOCH. 



Hartford City, Iml. Dec.. 18/03. ' 
~ 1. Kendall Co. 

emen—1 am thankful for 
your promptness in sending me 
the "Treatise on the 11- rse and 
his Diseases." I have used your 

Spavin Cure for a g 1 many 

years on hnrses and mules, also 
on myself and family with Lest re- 
sults. TIMOTHY KLIDY. 

Is Known the World Over 

as being the oldest and only really reliable cure for Spavins, Ringbone, Splints, Curbs 

and all other forms of Lameness. It has met with the unqualified endorsement of 
horsemen every n here, in all localities and under all conditions. It never fails, but cures 
quickly and permanently. 

In addition to being the best stable remedy known, it is unequalled as a liniment for 
household and family use. Sold generally by all druggists. Price $1; six bottles for $5. 
We send valuable book, "A Treatise oo the Horse," profusely illustrated, free upon request. 

DR. B. J. KENDALL CO., 

Enosburg Falls, Vermont. 




— TRADE MARK — u \J e 




Scores of Letters to ) <, . 
Confirm and Convince s 



Copies and Booklet 



Absolute and overwhelming evidence and certainties as to the marvelous and 
unfailing power of "3 AVE-THE-HORSE" on every kind and condition of oss.es. 

"S AVE-THE-HORSE" Is Indicated for any enlargement caused by an injury 
which leaves a thickened condition of the tissues or skin. 

"SAVE-THE-HOK8E" Permanently Cures Bone and Bog Spavin, 
Thoroughpin, Klngbone (except low ringbone), Curb Splint, Capped Hock, 
Wlndpuff, shoe Boll, Weak and Sprained Tendons and All Lameness. 
Apply In all extremes of weather. Cures without scar or loss of hair. Horses may 
work as usual 

•5 00 per bottle. Written guarantee wlth every bottle. Need of second bot- 
tle improbable, except In rarest cases. $5 00, at druggists and dealers or sent 

express by 

TROY CHEMICAL CO,, Binghampton, N, Y, 

(Formerly TROY, N. T ) 

D. E. NEWELL, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
Into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



January 28, 19C5J 



13 



Poultry Pointers. 



After all, it is not so much the breed as 
the care given to what you have, if the 
breed be good. 

A writer haB no confidence in the state- 
ment that hens get too fat to lay. He 
says that his hens lay beat in corn-husk- 
ing time, and that the farm hen is more 
likely to suffer from want of feed. 

The bowel trouble of chickens is often 
from cold rather than from errors in diet. 

Dry food is growing in popularity. Wet 
food is supposed to be the cause of bowel 
trouble. 

Farmers can scarcely afford to feed the 
fancy foods necessary to produce the first 
class results of fanciers who obtain high 
prices for eggs and their thoroughbred 
etojk. 

After ducklings are a few weeks old 
they are extremely hardv. They will 
thrive on what would be passed by by a 
chicken, or would kill it if eaten by the 
chick. 

It will not be safe to take poultry keep- 
ing as a short cut to wealth. Riches in 
anything are made as difficult as the 
catching a wild hen. It is a very un- 
certain chase. 

Feeding shelled corn is good feed to 
make hens lay in cold weather. 

One of the best times to fight poultry 
insects is before they appear. The ounce 
of prevention is the safest method. 

It don't pay to feed cheap food of any 
kind, nor to give cheap remedies. The 
best produces the best resu'ts. 

It is poor policy to wait until cold 
weather comes before preparing for it. 
The prudent, foresighted man prepares 
for cold or rain when it is warm or dry. 

There is a difference of opinion as to 
the necessity of grinding feed for chickens. 
But all are of the opinion that little 
chickens do not need wet food any more 
than the old hen does, and that it is 
more likely to injure them than it is to 
inju.e her. 

All kinds of poultry do well in the 
orchard, but all kinds should not be kept 
in the same yard. Large and small 
should be kept separate, and one kind 
should not be kept with another. 

Early hatchers are the best. Yet if one 
is unable to secure the early hatch, there 
is something in the late fryer or broiler. 
Chickens hatched as late as July may be 
raised, if the proper care is given to them. 
The large, slow growth varieties are not 
advisable for the late hatch, but some of 
the smaller varieties, such as Hamburgs, 
Leghorns and possibly the Plymouth 
Rocks. 

Estimates show that the combined 
value of poultry and eggs is nearly double 
that of the precious metals, and six times 
that of wool. Iowa leads in egg produc- 
tion, furnishing almost 100,000,000 dozen, 
Ohio, Illinois and Missouri come second, 
third and fourth. The average price of 
the eggs marketed in the United States is 
11.15 cents per dozen. 

The majority of fowls are in small flocks 
on a large number of farms, where they 
largely take care of themselvis and gather 
their own food. 

In Korea the farmers tie eggs together 
with long wisps of straw, unti' there are 
two dozen on a string; then go from house 
to house, cutting off as many as are 
needed. Sometimes the eggs are swung 
across a pony's back and carried to the 
customer in this way. 

The season and the hen should de 
termine the number of eggs that should 
be put under the hen for hatching. If 
the weather is cool and uncertain, she 
should not be given too many. 

Fowls fatten easily, so that if fed as 
much as they will eat, they will not hunt 
and scratch, so that they become lazy and 
do not do well. 

Little chicks need little or no food for 
the first twenty-four hours after they are 
hatched. They do best to remain under 
the hen as long as they will. — Texas 
Farmer. 



Sheep in Great Britain are especially 
adapted to their particular districts. 
Careful study has been made and sheep 
produced which are especially adapted to 
the locality. On the hills of Wales a 
light breed of mutton sheep possessing 
medium wool has been developed. These 
little sheep climb over the rocky ledges 
lightly pick their living among scanty 
herbage, produce a medium crop of wool 
and the sweetest mutton in all the world, 
to Welshmen say. On the bottcm lands 
in the south of England the heavier sheep 
is wanted, and the downs, according to 
English perversity are raised on the up- 
lands. But wherever sheep are found in 
Great Britain they are noticeably well 
adapted to their surroundings. 



The producing of fat varies greatly in 
milk, but it varies more with the poor 
milk of poorly fed scrubs than with 
other classes. 



Turtle's Elixir 

$100.00 REWARD. 

Cures all species of lameness, 
curbs, splints, contracted 
cords, thrush, etc., in horses. 
Equally good for internal 
use in colic, distemper,/oun- 
der, pneumonia, etc. Satis- 
faction guaranteed or money 
refunded. Used and endorsed 
by Adams Express Company. 
SOLD BY ALL DRUGGISTS. 
rUTTLE'8 FAMILY EUXIR Cures rheumatism, sprains, 
bruises, etc. Kills pain instantly. Our 100-page 
book, " Veterinary Experience, Free. 
TUTTI.E'S EUXIR CO., 52 Beverly St., Boston. Bass. 

Jlack i Co., Aponls. 13-15 Krpmont St., San Kra»rlsco, Cal. 
Beware of so-ealle.i Elixirs. futile' s only is glHUM. Aveza 
an blisters: they are only temporary rettef. 



Good Ones For Sale. 

\ S I HAVE NOT THE TIME NEEDED TO 
devote to my horses, I am offering the entire 
lot for sale, consisting of 

PflHip WfllHstfin 8 years, by Waldstein; 
I dlUC YYdlUSlCIU, dam Pattlel'. by Rich- 
mont. She Is heavy In foal to Nushagak and Is 
nominated In the Pacific Breedeis Futurity 
Stakes No. 5, 17000 guaranteed. She is a fine 
mare of excellent breeding and her foal should 
be a great prospect 

Prlnrp I yearling bv Prince Ansel; dam 
I I Mice L., p a ttieP. U entered In Breeders 
Futurity Stakes No. 4 and payments made to 
date. He Is a fine, large colt and a good prospect. 

THy V By Gold Rose; dam by Berger. She Is 
lll,v\. a na jf s i s ter to Advocatrix and is 
heavy In foal to a good son of Stam B and is also 
nominated in Breeders Futurity Stakes 
Hnitip I 5 years old; by Gold Rose: dam 
name L,. by Don. Is a half sister to Hattie 
B 2:20!4 by Alex Button. Is also heavy In foal 
to a son of Stam B. 

By Dictatus; dam 
Pattie P. 
Black Gelding by 
Geo. Washington; 
dam by Whippleton. 

The above are all well broken, good individ- 
uals and fine drivers. 
Send all communications to 

GEO. H. LENT, 
Isleton, Sacramento River, Cal 



Racing! Racing! 




One Two=Year-01d. 
One Five=Year=01d. 




FOR SALE. 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14 1-4 

TS A HANDSOME BLOOD BAY, WITH STAR 
In his forehead and one white foot. Stands 16 
hands and 1 inch; weighs 1250 lbs. Individually 
he is a horse of grand finish and plenty of sub- 
stance. Has a fine disposition, strong shoulders, 
stout back, very strong loins and stifles, strong 
bone, with good feet and legs He is sired by the 
great McKinney 2:11^ His dam, Lady Washing- 
ton 2:35, had 5 colts— Geo. W. McKinney 2: '.4 '4, 
El Molina 2.20. Washington McKinney (trial 
2:22 l /2>— was by Whipple, No. 8951; grandam Lady 
Mayberry, dam of Dubeo 2:16 and others. 

Horse is now at Hemet, Cal. For particulars 
address W. F. WHITTIER, 

20 Fremont St , San Francisco, Cal. 
Or F. H. HOLLOWAY, Hemet, Cal. 



McKINNEY STALLION WANTED 

rpWO-Y EAR-OLD PREFERRED. MUST BE 
good individual and well bred on his dam's 
side, and at a reasonable price. Address 

J. MCKINNEY, 
Care of Breeder and Sportsman, 
36 Geary St., San Franci-sco. 



New California Jockey CI 
OAKLAND TRACK 

COMMENCING SATURDAY, NOV. 12 

Racing Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

California Oaks 

$2000 ADDED 

To be Run SATURDAY, January 28. 

RACES START AT 3:15 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, ai 12,12:30,1, 
1:30 or 2. 

Returning, trains leave the track at 4:10 and 
4:45 p. m., and immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



1 A 



HIGH-CLASS MARE FOR SALE. 

RARV fi BAY MARE WITH BLACK 
DAD I U. points, foaled 1894, by Kebir 2:28 
(Reg. No. 13107); dam Olive by Prompter 2305; 
second dam Rachel by Wayland Forest; third 
dam Lightfoot by Flaxtail: fourth dam Fannie 
Fern by Irwin's Tuckahoe; fifth dam by Lefler's 
Consul, etc. BABY G. trotted quarters in 40 sec- 
onds as a yearling; is gentle and sound without 
even a windpuff. She has not been handled since 
her yearling form, but has been used as a brood- 
mare. Has a colt by Stam B 2:11M and a fllly by 
Barondale 2:11% that are very promising. 
Address ISAAC M. MODDISON, 

Marysville, Cal. 



Percheron Stallion 

FOR SALE. 

npv (REG. NO. 29793); FOUR YEARS 
rvCA j,j. dark j r0 n grey; will weigh 1800 or 
more when mature. Price $500. Address 

H. T. LILIENCRAN1 Z, 
Aptos, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 



Team For Sale. 

FINE TEAM OF YOUNG COLTS-STAL- 
lions— by a good son of Director. One 3 and 
one 4 years old. Well matched and well broken, 
gentle and drive well together. Good size, fine 
individuals dark brown in color. Address 
HENRY KLEMP, 
2917 G St., Sacramento, Cal. 



GOOD JACK FOR SALE. 

A FIRST-CLASS FOUR-YEAR-OLD JACK. 
L *- fine individual and sure foal getter. Address 
HENRY KLEMP, 
2917 G St., Sacramento, Cal. 



OPPORTUNITY OFFERED FOR AN IN- 
vestment of from $3000 to $5000, on which a 
profit of at least 10 per cent can be made within 
three months. Full particulars given on applica- 
tion. This is a legitimate proposition, and one 
that will bear the closest investigation. Address 
"OPPORTUNITY," Breeder and Sportsman 
Office, San Francisco, Cal. 



Two Prince Airlie Stallions For Sale. 

MILBRAE 3:16 M ^^w^lrl^W 
Fred Kohl 2:07Ji. Hulda 2:08^, Seymour Wilkes 
2:0854; 1st dam Fearless by Fallis 4781 (rec 2:23), 
sire of John R. Baldwin 2:17J<, Fallacy 2:17(4, Fal- 
rose 2:19, and dam of Janice 2-tl8'4; 2d dam Jean 
Perault by Signal 3327. MILBRAE has been in 
training just one year, getting a trotting record 
of2:16y, (trial 2:13) with first half in 1:05, a quar- 
ter in :31&. This is no measure of his speed. He 
is a seal brown, 16 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, 6 
years old. 

mbvi,, m»v TTiiti by Prince Alrlle 28045 by 
BOY 37401 Guy Wilkes 2:15^: 1st 
dam Signal by Del Sur 1098, grandam Lady Signal 
by Signal 3327. With very little work he has 
trotted in 2:29!4, quarters in :35. He is a brown 
with white pasterns, 16.1 hands, weighs about 
1170, and 5 years old. 
For further information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal 



CATTLE RANCH FOR SALE. 

17CA A„ roo SONOMA COUNTY, LYING 
1 1 0\J 2iLicb. west of Skaggs Springs; Gua- 
lala river runs through ranch; fine feed; scatter- 
ing timber and tanbark plentiful; numerous 
springs; 8 acres in fruit; 40 in grain; house, barn, 
corrals, chicken houses, etc.; grand trout stream 
and deer plentiful; 3000 acres fenced. Price of 
the 1750 acres deeded land, $12,000. 

D. M. HANLON, 
169 Crooker Bldg, San Francisco. 



Wanted to Train 



TROTTER OR PACER WANTED 

T WANT A GOOD-LOOKING INDIVIDUAL 
for a roadster, one that can show a good mile 
in matinee races. If any horseman has one that 
is not fast enougfl for racing purposes, but will 
make a good roadster, communicate with under- 
signed. Must be a good one and price must be 
right. JNO. T. SKELTON, 

1017 Second St , Sacramento. 



McKINNEY FILLY FOR SALE. 

A TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY SIRED BY Mc- 
Kinney; dam is a half-sister of Graoe Kaiser 
(the dam of Coney 2:02, McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 
2:21, Stipulator 2:11 and four others better than 
30). being sired by Kaiser, he by Geo. Wilkes. 
This Ally is now at the track, and with two 
months' work shows quarters In 35 seconds. 

W. H. YOUNG, 
337 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



A 



WANTED TO LEASE. 

A McKINNEY STALLION FOR P0BLIC 
use, on shares or otherwise. Must be a pure 
gaited trotter and out of a good individual mare. 
This is a rare opportunity for a horse of merit to 
make a reputation. Address M. L. L., in care of 
Breeder and Sportsman. 



A' 



FTER FEBRUARY 16th I WILL BE Lo- 
cated at the San Jose Race Track, and will 
take a few mote horses to train and, if desired, 
will campaign them next season. 
Present address: JACK CURRY, 

2605 Point Lobos Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



Sober up on Jackson's Napa Soda. 




McMURRAY 




FOR SALE. 

HANDSOME 4-YEAR-OLD BAY FILLY; 
paoer: stands 16. 254 hands; sired by McKin- 
ney, dam Mission Bell by St Nicholas. Full sis- 
ter to Mechanic. A smooth gaited filly, goes 
without straps or boots, and with less than a 
month's handling has paced a half in 1:11. Is sure 
to make a fast pacer. Address or apply to JOHN 
ROWAN, 1347 East South Street, Stockton, Cal. 



STOCK FARM FOR SALE. 

1,-iINE 3TOCK FARM, HIGHLY IMPROVED. 
" In choice location In California, for sale. 
Address Breeder and Sportsman. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE 2IBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Our Specialty: 
Boarding, Training and 
Handling all kinds of 
Fancy Horses. 

A few Nice Rigs always on hand 



Take any oar going 
to The Chutes 



McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

Standard the World Over. 
*J-Address for printed matter and prices. 

W. J. Kenney, 



531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Ca 



: 



Training, Boarding and Sale Stables 

Fulton St. & 241 h Ave., opposite the Casino. 

Hoarding and Training Iforses a Specialty. 

Horses for sale. Two Ideal roadsters now on 
hand. Will show a quarter in 32 seconds, pulling 
a buggy: Stand 16 bands, weigh 1200. Ready 
for inspection at any time. 

Telephone:. Park 377. T. C. CARNEY. 



Q0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEED FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PIOS 

for sale in lots to suit by 
EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 
308 California Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



14 



(The #x&&bttx mtfc &p&vt&xnaxx 



[January 28, 19(5 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of Johr Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEALY, Manager. 



A GREAT RACEHORSE AND A GREAT SIRE 

DIABLO 2:091-4 




FEE, 



S40 FOR THE SEASON. 
860 TO INSURE. 



Hls2:l5Hst IncludesSIr Albert S. 2:03%, Clipper 2:06. Dl 
abllto2-.0S'A Tom Cameal 2:08", Dacdalion 2:10 D odlte 
2:10J<. Dlawi.od 2:11, El Dlablo2:ll«, Tags 2:IIK.HI;0 
el Diablo 2:11H, Key del Diablo 2: and Inferno 2:15. 

Diablo's Sire, Chas. Derby 2:20, 

Don Derby 2:04tf. Much Better r:07X. Derby Princess 
2:08K. DIABLO 2:09 X, and 12 more with records better 
than 2:15 His grandsire, Stelnway 2:25%. bassired Ave 
in the 2:10 list, and his great grandsire, Strathmore, 
sired two and the dams of four 2:10 performers. 

Diablo's Dam, Bertha ^"b^riic 

California. She has three 2:10 performers and Ave 2:1s 
performers. Her sire has six in the 2:10 list and his 
daughters have produced eight in the 2:10 list. 

SEASON OF 1905 AT WOODLAND. 

Address 

C. D. CROOKHAM, 

WOODLAND, CAL. 



ZOLOCK 



Reg. No. 34471 

Eace Record 2:091 



SIKE OF 




Fee, $50 for the Season, 

Usual Return Privileges. 



DELILAH (2) 2:16 1-2, AMBUSH (2) 2:20. 

ZOLOCK 2:09H is by McKinney 2:I1M (sire of 11 in 
2:10 list): dam Gazelle 2:1 1 H (dam of Zolock 2:(>9>4 and 
Zephyr 2:11) by Go^lper 2: 14% (sire of Gazelle 2:11^, 
MiS3 Jessie 2:13%. etc ): second dam Gipsey (dam of 
Gazelle 2:11^. Ed Winshlp 2:15. etc ) by Gen. Hooth. 
From Zolock's first crop of colts came Delilah 2:1»X. 
wioner of two-year-old pacing division of Breeders 
Futurity of 1904 and fastest pacing two-year-old of 
1904, and Ambush, two year-old trotting record 2:20. 

Will Mike the 8eason of 1905 at 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles. 

For Tabulated Pedigree and further particulars 
address 

HENRY DELANEY. Agent, 

UNIVERSITY POSTOFFICE, CAL. 



HAL B. 2:04 



The Only High-Class "Hal" Stallion 
the Pacific Coast 



on 



HAL B. 2 04(4 was the sensation of the Grand Circuit In 1899, in wbloh he started nine times, 
winning all bis raoes. He was the largest money winner of that ssason. HAL B. is full brother to 
Fanny Dillard 2:03%, world's race record for pacing mares. At 11. years of age he Is the sire of fou r 
in the list. HAL B. is by Hal Dillard 2:04% (sire of Fanny Dlllard 2:03%. Hal B. 2:04'^, Hal Cllppe 
2:07!4. Cambina Maid 2:08'4, Young Hal 2:10M. Hallle Rackett 2:11, trotting, etc ), dam Ella (dam o T 
Fanny Dillard 2:03% and Hal B. 2:04V4) by Blue Boy, son of Blue Bull 75; second dam by Blue Bull 75' 

HAL B. is a handsome dark bay or brown stallion, stands 15.3'/4 hands and Is an ideal horse in 
every particular. Remember this Is your opportunity at home to breed to a distinguished represen t 
ative of the great Tennessee pacing family, "The Hals." 

Season at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until April 15, 1905. 

All correspondence concerning HAL B. while on this Coast should be addressed to 

OMER VAN KIRK, 
University P. O., Los Angeles, Cal. 



Terms, $50 Cash. 



Money refunded if mare proves not with foal. 
D, H. MAST, Owner, West Milton, Ohio. 



Reference: West Milton Bank. 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 



Reg. No. 
31706 



{Sire of Irish x:W<4, Fastest Four- Year -0M Pacer of ISM) 
By SIDNEY (Grandsire of LOU DILLON 1:5«H) 
Dam HATTIE (also dam of MONTANA 2:16). 
WILL MAKE THE SEASON OK 1005 AT 



SAN LORENZO 



SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS. 



MILPITAS 



WEDNESDAYS. THURS- 
DAYS and FRIDAYS. 



Fpp $S0 FOR THE SEASON. Good pasturage at $i per month. Best of care taken of 
UCC $o\J mares, but no responsibility for accidents or 



pedigree and full particulars. Address 



escapes Send for card containing 
P. .1. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



IRAN ALTO - 1-~> S, '>— Trotting Race Record 2:12}. 

The only stallion with so fast a record whose sire and dam held world's records. His sire is Palo 
Alto 2:08% by Electioneer: bis dam is Elaine 2:20, champion three-year-old of her day, and the dam 
of four and grandam of twelve in the list; second dam the great Green Mountain Maid, dam of nine 
la the list and also dam of the great Electioneer. 

IRAN ALTO'S first colt took a record of 2-.12H trotting, and he has sired fivemo.e in the list. 
Will make the Season of 1905 In charge of 

H. S. HOGOBOOM, Woodland, Cal. 



$40 for the Season. 




Old Age Is Incurable 

In man or beast, but almost all other common diseases of the horse can be 
prevented by the timely use of the best remedy on earth for distemper, epi- 
zootic colds, "grippe." catarrhal troubles, pinkeye, etc.— CRAFT'S DIS- 
TEMPER ft COUGH CURE the guaranteed remedy. It Is a liquid It 
kills germs, it saves horses. It is sold in $1 and 50c bottles; or direct, pre 
paid. Send for "Practical Pointers," a fine, new veterinary book, free. 



The Fastest Trotting Son of McKINNEY 

KINNEY LOU 2:071 

(WINNER OF S11.4SO IN 1903) 
Will make the Season of 1905 at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE. 

SERVICE FEE, $100. 

SEASON ENDS JULY 1. 1905. 

KINNEY LOU was one of the great race winners of 1903 
on the Grand Circuit, and is a high-class racehorse, game as 
a pebble and perfectly eaited. He is from race winning and 
producing families on both sides, his dam, Mary Lou 2:17, 
being a great race mare and own sister to the well-known 
racehorses Shylock 2:15^ and Ned Winslow 2:12%. Mary 
Lou is by Tom Benton out of Brown Jenny (dam of 3 in list) 
by Dave Hill Jr.; next dam by Black Hawk ?67 KINNEY 
LOU'S oldest colts are three-year-olds and all have size, 
good color, and are natural trotters with good dispositions. 
For further particulars and card containing Tabulated Pedigree, address 

BUDD DOBLE, San Jose, Cal. 




McKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STANDARD-BRED TROTTING STALLION 

MAC Dl RECT 

By McKinney 2 : 1 1 J ; dam Twenty-Third by Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15}) by Nutwood 600. 

Will Milo the Season of 1905 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 



Terms, $40 for the Season. 

To CI July 1st, 

Address or apply to 



Excellent Pasturage at Reasonable Rates. No 
barbed wire. Best of care taken of Mares, In 
any manner Owners may desire. 

CAPT. C. H. WILLIAMS. 

Hox 151, PALO ALTO, UAL. 



BREED TO A SIRE OF GRAND CIRCUIT WINNERS. 

STRATHWAY 21:9 

(REGISTER NO. 13214) 

Sire of Toggles 2:08;{, John Caldwell : i • , (in the money 13 times oat of IS start*). 
Homeward %tl&U i»lr« of Ueorge G 3:00 , , Strathmont .' : i : ; Cackoo 3:13, etc. 

Graham E Babaock. the owner, has decided to send STRATBVV AY. the greatest producing trot- 
ting son of the great Stelnway, to Pleasaocon for the season of 1905, beginning February 10th. 
STRATHWAY never had a chance till in the last couple of years, always being in a country where 
good mares were scarce; but ha is sure to be one of the greatest sires of California 

STRATHWAY H:19 is by the great Stelnway 2:25% and his dam is the great broodmare Countesa 
(the dam of Dawn 2:18%) by Whipple's Himbletonlau 725, sire of thedamof Azote 2:01%, Georgena 
2 07(4, etc Stelnway sired Klatawah fcUM champion three-year-old; W. Wood 2:07, Agitato 2:09, 
Cricket 2.10, Silver Coin 8:10 and 8 more with records below 2:15. His sons have produced Don Derby 
2:04M. Wiotield Stratton 2:05% and many mire with records below 2:10 His daughters have produced 
Stanley D'llon 2:07%, winner of the M. & M of I911; Tuna 2:08^4, fastest four-year-old trotting mare of 
190-1; Ben F 2.09'i, one of the best winners on the Grand Circuit of 1904, and many others in the 2:10 list. 

STKtTHWAY will make the Season of 1905 at SANTA RITA STOCK FARM, near 
PLEA SAN TON, CAL Fee 1*50 for the Season, with nsual return privileges. 

Plenty of Rood pasture for mares at $1 per month, at owner's risk. The veteran handler, 
Humphrey Sullivan, will have charge of the ho-se. Address 

S. CHRISTENSON, Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Cal. 

Or JAMES THOMPSON, Pleasanton, Cal. 



ZOMBRO 2:11 

Will make the Season of 1905, from February 1st to June 1st, 
At 4645 Agricultural Ave , adjoining Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 



GREATEST SON 
OP 

McKINNEY 2: Hi 



Fee, $50 for the Season, 



»Vlth return privilege If the 
Mare proves not with Foal. 



ZOMBRO is the sire of the fastest two-year-old trotting ally of 1901, sire of thewlnnerof two- 
year-old trotting division of Pacific Breeders Futurity, sire of the fastest two year-old in Oregon last 
year and of the wioner of the Oregon two-year old stake, in which the Zombros won first and third 
money. ZOMBRO has sired more 2:30 performers than all the rest of McKlnney's sons put together. 
He has seven In the list and thirty more ready to drop in His standard performers are Zephvr 2:11, 
Zombowyette 2:18. Tee Dee Gee 2:19*4, Hjllemont (2) 2:20!4, Italia 2:23H, Lord Kitchener 2:24>4, and 
Lady Zimbro 2:24'/4— all trotters. ZOMBRO Is the only horse living or dead that ever won 40 heats 
in standard time as a three-year-old. His get are all large, beautifully formed and endowed with 
great natural speed. The choicest pasture for mares. Address 

GEO. T. BECKERS, University, Cal. 



CAMPBELL'S 



FOOT REMEDY best" S5av 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and TILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
oompouDds. It Is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good services out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements. 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NESS quickly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS if directions are followed. 

It PRE.VENTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH. STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on race courses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for traek 
work nothing equals it. In many cases horses have reduced 
their records several seconds, due to its use. 

It is a CER'J AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 

We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICK8:-Quarts, tl 00; Half-Gallon, (1.75; Gallon, 13 00. 
2H-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, 110.00. 

Books giving full directions for its use and much valuable information as to shoeing are supplied 

Don't fall to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure in next 
Issue of this paper. It is the best and because of its merits Is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAriPBELL&CO.. Manufacturers, 4 12 VV.HadUon St., CHICAGO, ILL. 

Sold by all Dealers In Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for It 




paid. Send for "Practical Pointers, a fine, new veterinary book, free. ■ »i «■ ii* r p r IflflE 

Wells Medicine Co. SESSK 1 3 3d st, Lafayette, Ind J AdVBPtlSe YOUP StalllOll tOP Season Of 1905. 



January 28, 1 905 1 



X 



IF WE' COULD SEE YOU and take 
you into our FACTORY, WE could 
easily SHOW 



YOU WHY 



The Parken 



GUN is the BEST 



in the WORLD 




•■""■WE aim to iirikt- anil <lo make the IJKST possible production 
or the UUNHAKER'S A KT. WE are jnalonk-of our reputation 
and will not cheapen the quality of our GUN, no mttter wh»t 
others may do. IF you want a GUN you can coutlde In us. 
Write today. 



30 CHERRY STREET 



MERIDEN, CONN. 



NEW PRICE 



All Gun, No Extras, 



No. 00 Armour Steel 
L, C. SMITH GUN 




Send for Catalogue 



HUNTER ASMS CO., Fulton, N. Y. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




We Make 16 Oracle s, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., ITHACA, N. Y. 

?„ Coa st Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 

SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send tor 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

i Mailorders 
a Specialty 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Tie AHer and Ootii Trips 

One day's rido from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams In tho 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
In the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by Its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year in these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed in Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annually by the Company, Is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
Information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mail request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



T M LITCH FIELD & CO —Drivers' Suits, 
J • Colors and Caps, Ofllcial Badges. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 12 Post St.. San Francisco. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORN S— OjUINTO HEKD-77 pre- 
miums Cal State Fair 190J-3-4 Young stork for 
sale. Write us what you want Est. of W. H. 
Howard. 206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



SHIRK HORSES (four Stallions, foals of 
1902) sired by British Oak, No. 5687, A. S. H. A.. 
Sweepstakes Drafter at California State Fairs 
Estate of W. H Howard, 206 Sansome Street 
San Francisco. 

PETER SAXE & SON. Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
class breeding stock. Correspondence solicited 

HOL8TBIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners atStateand county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter contest since 1885 In 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOL8TEIN8 AND DORH AM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry Estab- 
lished 1876. William Nlles 4 Co.. Ins Angeles 
Oal. 




Photo Engraving Company 

II Kill CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 
bob Mission St., cor. First, SanFranclscu. 



AT STUD_ 

CUBA Ob KENWOOD 

(Qler.beigh Jr.— Stella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOGKDALE KENNELS 

R. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Rakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



Advertisement under thie head one ctnt per word 
per insertion. Cask to accompany order. 



JA8. L. FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROOS RROS. 

Outfitters 
to 



MEN 



25 to 27 



BOYS 
KEARNY ST. 

at POST 




Absorbine, Jr., 

Cures Boils, 
Abcesses, etc. 
Kills Pain, 
Absorbs Any Soft Bunch. 

If afflicted send $1 .00 for a bottle. 

Describe your case fully, and any 
special directions needed will be 
sent free. Address the Mfgr., 

W. F. YOUNG, P. D. F., 

SPRINGFIELD, • - MASS. 

For sale bv Mac»ACo Langiey AMiohaelsCo , 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kane and J. A. McKerron, 
all of San Francisco. 



THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of tho kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 
BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

l- It lit I, Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colls broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guarantied. Terms reasonable. Pbono: Page 1324 



T 
1 



mm 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 
24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal, 



COLLIES 



AIAGNIFICENTLY BRED PUPPIES AND 
1, -Brown stock. Five stud dogs in servlpx 



ST. BERNARDS. 



AT STUD-CHAMPION LE KING. QRAND- 
tr es' headed St. Bornard on the Coast. Fee tio 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE 
r„iir£Sii e Pu PP'es sired by Cb. Loyne Ruffian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History. Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Train i n g, Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc. apply 
toother breeds as well as lo Cockers, and it is a 
useful book for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach Inem to perform tricks. 

FOR 8ALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
CoUege of Turin 

Infumary and Residence— 811 Howard St.: 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco 
Telephone: South 456. 



X>r. Wm, F". Sjgan. 

M. R. C. V. S.. F. E. Y. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspector for New Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President oi 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office, 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco: 
Telephone Park 128. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 

Telephone Main ivu 

CALIFORNIA 



Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cured In 48 Hours. 



CAPSULES 



Hnperlor to Copaiba, Cnbeos or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Paolflc Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 80 toaohers; TO typewriters; over 800 students 
annually placed In positions. Send for oatalogue 

E. f. HEALD. President. [ 



And type written 
Ready for framing 
Write for prices. 

Breeder and Sportsman, 38 Geary Street 
San Francisco. Cal 



16 



[January 28, 1905 




ORSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Z,2\yz&* 



AN INVINCIBLE COMBINATION 




THE ALWAYS RELIABLE 
ALWAYS SATISFACTORY KIND 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 



BOTH 
THE 
BEST 

IN 
THEIR 
LINE. 

E. E. DRAKE, Manager. 
6-88 First Street, _ 
FRANCISCO. CAL 



Union Metallic Cartridge Company. ^ 



REMINGTON 
SHOT GUNS 



REMINGTON ARMS COMPANY. 



JttNCHESJm 



^nvjiitJixTivriTioixr, rifles, shotguns 

WERE AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE. 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



Laflin & Rand Powders 

"INFALLIBLE." 

"E, G." 

and 

"SCHULTZE" 

won everything in sight 
At the \V)\ Grand American Handicap. 
Now Is the time to get in line 
for the 1905 G. A. H. 
by shooting the powder 
The Champions shot. 



c. 



P. W. BR ANDS. 

SMOKELESS SHOTGUN SHELLS. 

PATTERN 

PERFECTION 

INVINCIBLE 

Loaded with Any Standard Brand of 
Smokeless Powder. 

When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 

and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg„ 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



DuPONT SMOKELESS 

During 1904 
Besides winning both the 
Professional and Amateur Championships 
was shot by 
Six out of the first ten high men. 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

Makes Shooting Stars. 



Clabrough, 

GUNS 
Gun Goods 

«-Send for Catalogue. 



Golcher & Go. 

FISHING 




Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 



You can get these Smokeless Powders in 

FACTORY ... CUT! I ^ 
LOADED. . OPl LLLd 
DU PONT SHOTGUN RIFLEITE 

"E. C." BALLISTITE 
SCHULTZE LAFLIN Sc RAND 

HAZARD 'INFALLIBLE " 

What More do vou Want? 




JT^Sf-..: ^. SAN FRANCISCO, SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 4, 1905. .hb^SSST™. 




KINNEY LOU 2:07| (TROTTING) 




ZOMBRO 2:11 (trotting) ' 

MENDOCINO 2:104 (TROTTING) 



A QUARTETTE OF WELL KNOWN CALIFORNIA STALLIONS 



2 



(The i^vcefcer anfr gtp&vt&tncm 



l February 4, 1905 



CAMPBELL'S 



IODOFORM GALL CURE 

""■Ketone CAN BE WORKED AS USUAL 

For BARBED VVIRK CUTS CALKS SCRATCH^ 
KS HLHOI) POISONED SORES anil ABRASIONS 
OF THE SKIN it has no equal. „.,„, 
It is very adhesive and easily applied to a waterj 
as well as a dry sore. nnn nnianv 

Its use will absolutely prevent BLOOD POISON 
ING. In this respeot there is do Gall Cure offeree, 
which can justly even claim to be a competitor. 
We placed it on the market relying wholly on its 
merit for success, and notwithstanding the fact that 
comparatively little has been done in the way of 
advertising the salesof 1900 were lUpp er cent i met- 
er than the aggregate sales of Gall Cure Preceding 
that year. This increase was entirely due to its 
M FRITS and from it we feel just i tied in saying that 
i t ™E O ALL CURE OF TH E 20TH CENTU BY. 

It is a auiok and sure cure fir those troublesome 
skin cracks under the f e -ck v flich injure and often 
lay up race horses. 
All Trainers Should Have It In Their Stables 

FK1CE: — 3 OZ. BOX, 25c; 1 LB. BOX, Sl.OO. 

Read our "ad." on Campbell's Horse Foot Remedy in next issue of this pap*-r. 

JAS. B. CAMPBELL & CO., Mfrs.,412 W. Madison St., Chicago, III. 

Sold by all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stook art thjtn to writs anyJobbertor it 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



3 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into whioh for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. This space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 
WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished in Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladies-the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numerous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 




Take It In Tune 

| t lf you have the remedy on hand, and are rea.ly to 
act promptly, you will find thai there is nolh:n< in 
the form of Spavins, Splints. Curbs. IVindRUffa and 
Bunches which will not yield promptly an J perma- 
nently to 

Qu inn's Ointment 



It has saved thousands of (rood horses from the ped'il-r'a 
eart and the broken-down horse market. Mr.!'. It l»iek- 
n». «»f Minneapolis Minn, who condiiets one of ihv largest livery stables in the Noithwest. 
I writes a- follows- I have been DStng Quinn's Ointment I or some time and with the nrv htMl 

■DCOeai I take plcarmrn In recommendlD g it to my friends. No horseman should be • ith- 
out it In his stable. For curbs, splints, spavins, wind puffs and all bunches it has i.<> .•.,i>:il." 
Price S 1 .00 per bottle. Sold by all druggists or sent by mail. V rite us for ein ulais, 

W. B. Eddy & Co., Whitehall, N. Y. 




VICTOR VERIL1IAC 

Proprietor 
JAMES M. HoGBATH 

Manager 



DEXTER PRINCE STABLES 

TRAINING, BOARDING AND SALE 

Cor. of Grove and Baker Streets, just at the Panhandle Entrance to Golden Gate Park 

(Tako Hayes, McAllister or Devisadero Street Cars) 

Best located and healthiest Stable in San Francisco. Always a good roadster on hand for 
sale. Careful and experienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters and prepare horses for 
track use. Ladles can go and return to stable and not have their horses frightened by automobiles 
or cars. 



0AKW00DS STOCK FARM 



PERCHERON, 
BELGIAN and 
COACH 
STALLIONS 

California's Largest Importing and Breeding Establishment. 

High-class Stock always on hand. Good terms. Moderate prices. Liberal guarantee Visitors 
always welcome. Address all correspondence to 

OAKWOODS STOCK FARM, Fbancis I. HODGKlJts, Prop., STOCKTON. C\L 



SINGMASTER 6t SONS.of Keota Iowa, 

BREEDERS AND IMPORTERS OF| 

PERCHERONS, SHIRES, BELGIAN AND FRENCH COACH HORSES 

Have a Branch Barn at 

127 St. John Street, San Jose, Cal. 

High-class stock always on hand. It will pay to call and Inspect stock If you are in need of a 
good stallion C. O. STANTON. San Jose Manager 



MANHAJTAg 



RED BALL BRAND. 

Positivelv Ci'res Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C F. KERTELL. Manager 



Awarded Gold Meda 
At California State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horseowner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of it on hand. It 
improves and keepe 
stock in the pink of 
condition. 

t\<inhaitaa Pood Co 

1 253 Folsom St., San Francisco 

ABk your grocers or dealers for it. 



Advertise Your Stallion for Season of IgOS. 



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Giving- Performances of the Get 
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Thoroughbred Pedigrees 



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Pedigrees and Performances :::: 



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Breeder and Sportsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



February 4, 1905] 



3 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Tjrf and Sporting Authority ot the Pacific oast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O BOX 2300. 
telephone: Black 686. 



Terms— One Year »3, Six Months SI .75, Three Months SI 
STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Keiaey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, February 4, 1905 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 



DIABLO 2:09H C D. Crookbam, Woodland 

HAL B. 2:0i</t Omer Van Kirk, University P. O., Los Angeles 

IRAN ALTO 2:12M H. S. Hogoboom, Woodland 

KINNEY LOU 2:07& Budd Doble, San Jose 

MAC DIRECT Capt. C. H. Williams. Palo Alto 

MENDOCINO 2:19H Pal ° Alt0 Stock Farm 

MCKENA 39460 Palo Alto Stock Farm 

MONTEREY 2:09H P. J. Williams, San Lorenzo 

STRATHWAY 2:19 James Thompson, Pleasanton 

ZOLOCK 2-.09H Henry Delaney, University P. O , Cal 

ZOMBRO 2:11 Geo. T. Beckers, University, Cal 



BILLS appropriating several millions of dollars 
more than can possibly be raised during the next 
two years by taxation have been introduced in the 
California Legislature to date, and the session is not 
yet half over. As nearly every measure introduced is 
backed by some interest more or less influential and 
energetic, that is working for its passage and also for 
its approval by the Governor, the outlook for any 
money being appropriated for district fairs is very 
poor, as no new bills uor amendment to the old bill 
which provided for them, has been introduced as yet 
and it is pretty certain that Governor Pardee will not 
favor the old measure, as he considers the amount it 
carries too great for the present condition of the 
State's finances. From those who have talked with 
the Governor about the district fairs, we learn that 
he favors them and also favors the State giving them 
financial aid, but thinks a better and more economical 
measure than the present law governing them can be 
devised that will make them of much greater benefit 
and value to all concerned. There does not seem to 
b9 any active or concerted movement on the part of 
breeders and agriculturists toward the introduction 
of any measure which will provide for the district 
fairs. The State Fair directors are alert and have 
already had bills introduced in both houses which if 
passed will put the State Agricultural Society on its 
feet and provide a spendidly appointed fair ground, 
but the district boards are taking no steps to 
induce the Legislature to provide for their fairs. 
The Board of Directors of the Pacific Coast TrottiDg 
Horse Breeders Association is the only body that has 
done any thing- along these lines, and as an organiza- 
tion of representative breeders, repre<enting interests 
that pay large sums annually into the State Treasury, 
they have done what they could to start a movement 
which will result in appropriations being made for 
district fairs. But while the Breeders Association has 
sent a committee to Sacramento which waited on the 
Governor and discussed the situation with several 
members of the legislative body, it is about the only 
organization that has shown any energy in tho matter. 
This being the condition that confronts the harness 
horse breeders of California, they should take im- 
mediate steps toward holding a series of race meetings 
in the State this year whether the district fairs are 
held or not. At Los Angeles, Fresno, Stockton, 
Pleasanton, San Jose, Petaluma, Santa Rosa, 
Vallejo and Woodland there are good mile tracks 
provided with the necessary stalls and buildings, 
and first class harness meetings can be held 
at each and every one of those places that will be 
well patronized and financially successful. There is a 
demand for the formation of a California Circuit of 
Harness Meetings, without waiting for the "aid or 
consent" of any district or State body. Ownorsor 
tesees of tracks and breeders of harness horses are 
the ones to organize such a circuit. The Breeders' 
Association Is willing to give one or two extra meet- 
ings in addition to Its regular annual event, but its 
officers prefer that the local people manage their own 
meetings, cannot a meeting be called within the next 
two weeks of representatives of the cities and tracks 



named above? We should like to hear from those of 
our readers who have ideas and views oa thesubject. 



DALO ALTO STOCK FARM still owns two stal- 
1 lions — Mendocino 2:19$, sire of Monte Carlo 
2:07}, etc., and the McKinney stallion McKena 39460. 
These stallions will stand for public service this year, 
Mendocino at S100, and McKena at $35. McKena is a 
grand, large horse 16.2 :ind weighs 1350 pounds. His 
dam is Helena 2:11} by Electioneer A more extended 
notice of these stallions will appear next week. In 
the meantime we ask our readers to look over the 
Palo Alto Farm's advertisement in thisissue. 



The Best Bred Colt. 

Chas. A. Durfee, tho former owner of McKinney, 
was looking over the exchanges in the Breeder and 
Sportsman office last week and noticed that several 
eastern breeders were claiming to own the "best bred 
colt." 

"I think I have an entry in that contest, " remarkc d 
Mr Durfee, "and on a showdown will come pretty 
near getting all the money. My entry is Galindo, 
and you know how he is bred." 

Mr. Durfee's claim is entitled to consideration. 
Galindo is by McKinney 2:11}, acknowledged to be the 
greatest sire of his age that ever lived. His first dam 
is the great broodmare Elsie, dam of Palita, two-year- 
old record 2:16, Rio Alto, three-year-old recoid 2:16$, 
Mary Osborne, yearling record i:37 and three-year- 
old record 2:28}, Novelist, two-year-old record 2:27, 
and Salvini 2:30. Four of Elsie's daughters have 
produced standard speed and her son Salvini is the 
sire of Easter 2:12$. Elsie is by Gen. Benton, whose 
daughters have produced Sunol 2:08}, a world's record 
at the time it was made, Serpol 2:10, Cobwebs 2:12, 
Azmon 2:13$, El Rami 2:14, and the pacers Lena N. 
2:05}, Rajah 2:10} and Colonel Benton 2:14$. 

The second dam of Galindo is another great brood- 
mare, Elaine 2:20, herself the holder of a world's 
record, and the dam of Iran Alto 2:12$, Palatine 2:18, 
Anelma2:29$ and Altoaine 2:29$. Elaine's son, Iran 
Alto, is the sire of Dr. Frasse (4) 2:12$, Thomas R. (4) 
2:15 and several more in the list. Herdaughters have 
produced eight in the list. Elaine is by Messenger 
Duroc 106, sire of 21 standard performers, 25 produc- 
ing sons and 50 producing daughters. 

Green Mountain Maid, one of the greatest of all 
great broodmares, is the third dam of Mr. Dur- 
fee's colt. She is the dam of nine standard per" 
formers and has four producing sons including Elec- 
tioneer 125, sire of more standard trotters than any 
other stallion, and five producing daughters. Green 
Mountain Maid's sons have sired such fast ones as 
Arion 2:07|, Sunol 2:08}, Palo Alto 2.08}, Swift 2:07, 
and Direct View 2:08J, and their daughters have pro 
duced Klatawah (3) 2:05$, Dolly Dillon 2:06f, Lisonjero 
2:08}, Cavaliero 2:09} and many more. 

If there is a colt whose breeding is any better than 
Galindo's, Mr. Durfee says he would like to hear of 
him. By McKinney 2:11} th^t ha6 34 in the 2:15 list, 
and with his first three dams the producers of a total 
of 18 standard performers, it does look as though 
Galindo has those eastern best bred fellows "skinned 
a block." 

Answers to Correspondents. 

Owen H. Wright, Davisville— The stallion Noon- 
day 10000, brown horse foaled 1883, by Wedgewood 
692; dam Noontide 2:20$, dam of Noonday 2:30 and 
Midi (p) 2:11, by Harold 413; second dam Midnight, 
dam of Jay Eye See 2:06}, Electricity 2:17:{ and Noon- 
tide 2:20$ by Pilot Jr. 12; third dam Twilight by 
thoroughbred Lexington. Wedgewood, the sire of 
Noonday was by Belmont 64 out of Woodbine by 
Woodford, thoroughbred. 

Clyde Mastellco, Oroville— Silver King 3622, 
chestnut horse, foaled 1881, is by Hambletonian 725 
dam Harvest Queen 2:29$ by Hambietonian 10; second 
dam Dubois Mare by Amorican Star 14; third dam by 
Abdallah 1. Silver King is the sire of Silver Queen 
2:19$, King of the Ring 2:21 and the pacer Yellow 
Jacket 2:20$. 

William Hashagen, Woodland— Brognoli 77 was 
by Mambrino Chief 11, dam Sally Woodford by 
Wood ford , second dam by Hunt's Commodore. He 
had a record of 2:29|. Ho did not sire any standard 
performers, but one of his daughtors produced Brig- 
noli Wilkes 2:14$ and several others with standard 
records. Cresco 4908, is by Strathmore, dam Alia by 
Almont 33, second dam by Brignoll 77. Liska 2:28} 
by Electioneer is the dam of Lunda 2:18} by Norris 
and Lisonjero 2:08}, Liso 2:20} and Princess Lesa 2:22 
by Dexter Prince. 

Jackson's Napa Soda Is sold in every city, town 
and hamlet in the State. 



Strathway 2:19 to High Wheels. 

Among the many well bred stallions that have 
forced their way to recognition in spite of the hacd : . 
cap of the lack of opportunity, Strathway, son of 
Steinway, is a notable example. Strathway was bred 
by A. L. Whitney who also bred his half-brother 
Dawn 2:18j{ that used to be known, when he was alive, 
as the fastest stallion that ever looked through a 
bridle. Mr. Whitney retired from the breeding ranks 
and his horses were sold, and neither Strath way or 
Dawn ever had the chances In the stud they were 
entitled to, but both achieved some fame, and now 
Strathway is just beginning to be recognized as one 
of the best producing stallions in California, and his 
owner, Graham E. Babcock, of Coronado, has sent 
him to this section of the State, that Strathway may 
have an opportunity to be mated with some good 
mares in this part of the country. Strathway will be 
at Pleasanton during the season, and parties wishing 
to breed to him should address James Thompson 
Pleasanton, or S. Christenson, Palace Hotel, San 
Francisco. 

Strathway made his record in 1892 to high wheel 
sulky over the Tulare track which was considered 
several seconds slow. He is a chestnut horse of fine 
proportions and bis get have uniform good looks and 
great natural speed. 

In 1901 Charles Clark of Fresno took Strathway's 
unsexed son Toggles across the mountains and started 
him in races against such fust ones as Dolly Dillon 
2:06|, Onward Silver 2:05}, Alcedalia 2:10}, Fereno 
2:05$ and others and beat them all in heats or races, 
quitting the season with a record of 2:08$. Last year 
John Caldwell, another gelding by Strathway, was 
one of the star trotters of the Grand Circuit in the 
green classes, winning about $7000 for his owner, and 
g jtting a mark of 2:1 1}. Another good trotting son 
of Strathway was Homeward that took a record of 
2:13} and is the sire of that sensational trotter George 
G. 2:06} that sold for $)5,000. Another son of Strath- 
way, achieved prominence this year as a sire. We 
refer to Stoneway 2:23| that is the sire of My Way 
2:22 and Stonelita 2:20. 

Strathway is by the great Steinway and out of a 
great broodmare by Whipples Hambletonian, 6ire of 
the dams of Azote 2:04^, Georgena 2:07}, and many 
others. 

In breeding to a stallion it is wise to pick those that 
have produced Grand Circuit winners, as that is the 
supreme test of a good trotter or pacer. One that 
can win there can win anywhere on earth. Few stal- 
lions can put five in the 2:15 list with the limited op- 
portunities Strathway has had. 



No Option on Mack Mack. 

Breeder and Sportsman: — A certain horse dealer 
having sta;ed that he holds an option on the McKin- 
ney gelding, Mack Mack, I hereby state that nobody 
has held an option at any time, and no option will bo 
given. Disposition of the horse remains with the 
owner, J. R. Bowles of Portland, Oregon. 
Yours truly, 

J. R. Bowles. 

Portland, Or., Jan. 31, 1905. 

The handsome and fast trotting mare Dollexa 2:21} 
by Alexis 18340, owned by Mr. C. F. White, of Wash- 
ington, died at San Jose last week. Dollexa was bred 
last year to Monterey 2:09}, was in foal, and had been 
nominated in Breeders Futurity No. 5. Her foal of 
tho previous year was also by Monterey and is a very 
promising yearling. 

A four-year-old brother to Fereno 2:05$ was sold at 
the Splan sale In Chicago two weeks ago for $700 The 
price was low for his looks and breeding, but the fact 
that he was consigned direct from the Walnut Farm 
led buyers to believe that he had been tried and 
found wanting in speed. Otherwise, says Henry 
White of thoChicago journal, the four-year-old would 
have brought $2000. 

Mr. Caplatzski of Santa Cruz, who owns a fino mare 
by Nutwood Wilkes 2:16$, has leased her to Mr. 
Henry Struve of Watsonville for breeding purposes. 
Mr. Struve will breed her to Welcome 2:10$ and the 
cross should bo a good one. 



Stam B. 2:11} will be at Pleasanton again this year 
and his service fee will bo the same as last year, with 
return privilege. He will be in charge of C. H. 
Gemmill. Further particulars next week. 



Tho old Kentucky Racing Association which first 
held a meeting in Lexington in 1826 is to be revived. 
Articles of incorporation have been filed, giving ex- 
istence to a new corporation at the head of which Is 
Captain S. S. Brown who owns the plant. The old 
association held meetings continuously between 1826 
and 1897 save during tho Rebellion. 



4 



|February 4, 1905 



JOTTINGS. H 



Budd 'Doble and Lou Dillon are having a good 
time at San Jose this winter. The famous reinsman 
was in San Francisco this week and told me be was 
jogging the daughter of Sidney Dillon from eight to 
fifteen miles a day on the roads and that she has taken 
on at least fifty pounds since she arrived Ic California. 
He says she is a bundle of nerves and will power and 
when he takes her out for exercise, walks her as much 
as possible, never calling on her to go faster, but coax- 
ing her back as there is no time she is not ready to 
jog or even trot fast if permitted. Mr. Doble says 
the trotting queen is "city broke" as she has never 
shied at street cars, bicycles or auto?, but goes by 
them as if she has been brought, up in a modern city 
and stabled in a round house. She wants to trot fast 
and show her speed on any and all occasions and it takes 
lots of that patience, which Doble possesses to as great 
a degree as any man, to keep her down to the prosaic 
jog that is in keeping with the manners of a mare 
that is simply in California during the winter for her 
health. 

Monroe Salisbury took a short sea voyage last week 
and came back to Pleasanton with a bay pacer that 
ia now a member of the Butler string and being 
worked by Cnas. DeRyder. They call this pacer 
Bolivar W. He is by Wayland W. 2:12$ and can show 
a 2:10 gait. It is said that Mr. Salisbury paid $2500 
for him and the Pleasanton horsemen who have 
seen the fellow go, say he is worth more money. Mr- 
Salisbury purchased him at Eureka, Humboldt Co., 
going up on the steamer Pomona, getting the horse, 
and returning with him on the same vessel. 



An incident happened at Pleasanton last Monday 
that is worth chronicling in this journal. W. J. 
Speers, of Oakland, who has used the handsome little 
mare Sadie Moor 2:26 by Grand Moor as a buggy 
mare for several years, drove over to Pleatanton that 
day to see a gentleman in regard to selling her. He 
drove her to his road buggy, and leaving Oak- 
land at noon reached Pleasanton, thirty or more 
miles distant over the hills, in four hours. Will 
Johnson, who trains for Messrs. Brace and Minor of 
Eureka, met Mr. Speers on his arrival, and it hap- 
pened that Mr. Brace was with him. Mr. Speers re- 
marked to Mr. B. that Sadie Moor would make a 
good broodmare, but the latter said he was loaded up 
with all the breeding stock he wantod and could not 
think of buying any more. Mr. Speers, however j 
suggested that Sadie be hitched to a cart and that 
Mr. Brace drive her around the track once or twice to 
see what a nice driver she is, and Mr. B reluctantly 
consented. So Sadie Moor was taken from the buggy 
she has just pulled for thirty miles and hooked to a 
cart. Mr Brace weighs 216 pounds, but is active, and 
mounting the cart took the lines and started the 
mare up. He drove her around the track once and 
then wont back up the stretch to the half-mile pole, 
turned her around, jogged to the three-quarter pole 
and called on her. Sadie Moor is fifteen years old this 
spring and has had three foals, but with all the fire 
and speed of her youth sbe trotted the quarter in les9 
than 36 seconds, several watches held by the spectators 
catching the time as 2:35$. Mr. Brace dismounted 
and told Mr. Speers that he wanted the little mare 
and the sale was made. Few mares of that age could 
equal the performance under like conditions. Mr. 
Brace will breed her to his young stallion Grecko, son 
of McKinney and Aileen by Anteeo, second dam Lou 
Milt in, dam of Lou Dillon l:58i. Mr. Speers owns a 
filly from her by Waldstein that is coming two years 
old and is a very handsome and well proportioned 
trotter with much promise as a road mare, the use to 
which her owner will put her, and Mr. Kohler of Oak- 
land owns a yearling colt from her by Guy McKinney 
that is an excellent prospect. 



Mr. Brace recently purchased a filly bv Waldstein 
out of a Grand Moor mare that trotted a quarter as a 
two-year-cld in 39 seconds. She is very large and 
weighs eleven hundred poimds, although but three 
years old. Mr. Brace paid $350 and will iireed her to 
Grecko. 

An interesting piece of news that comes from 
Pleasanton this week is that Mr. Isaac Minor, the 
owner of the trotter Morosco 2:12 refused a big 
offer for him last week — a person who should know 
the facts saying that the amount was $11,000. 
Morosco was undoubtedly the highest class trotter on 
the California Circuit last season, and a record below 
2:10 should be easily within his reach this year. Mr. 
Minor, who is a well-to-do lumberman of Humboldt 
county, states that he has not had a good vacation 
for many years and that he contemplates entering 



Morosco on the Grand Circuit this year and with his 
better half will make the tour to see the horse trot. 
If Morosco should make a good showing among the 
horses in his class on the big ring Mr. Minor will 
consider that he has been fully repaid for keeping 
him and refu ing the offer, although the winnings do 
not amount to the sum offered. 



James Thompson dropped in at the ofiice of the 
Breeder and Sportsman on Thursday of this 
week, looking as slick and prosperous as a frenzied 
financier. This was his first visit to San Francisco, 
In the daytime, since his return from the Grand Cir- 
cuit, where he campaigned Col. J. C. Kirkpatrick's 
good trotter John Caldwell 2:11 J, known to the 
Eastern scribes as the "best managed horse that 
went down the big line in 1904." Thompson has 
quite a string at the Pleasanton track and is handling 
several youngsters for the Colonel that have every 
symptom of the speed disease. I have never seen a 
trainer who knew Thompson who doubted his ability 
a-i a conditioner. His horses always look well when 
they are seen on the track, and they get to the races 
in condition to show something of their quality. 
"Jeems" speaks in the very highest praise of the 
Grand Circuit of 1904, but thinks that 1905 will be 
even better. George Hayt Is the right man in the 
right place, according to Thompson, who believes 
that the presiding judge of 1904 is a man of ability 
who tries to do right all the time, and that any mis- 
takes he makes are unintentional. When asked about 
the new Grand Circuit starter, Mr. Newton, he said: 
"Well, they say he is a high class man, and I think he 
must be, or they would not have engaged him, but I 
don't see how any one can beat Frank Walker very 
much." 

By the way, Mr. Thompson says he is in the market 
for good trotters or pacers that have class enough to 
race in the matinees over East or on the Grand Cir- 
cuit. So I advise all owners who have a crackerjack 
for sale (and their name is legion in California) to 
write to James Thompson at Pleasanton, giving a full 
description of their horses, and the lowest cash price, 
and I'll wager right now that Thompson's mail during 
the next two months will be the cause of a petition 
for a raise in the salary of the Pleasanton Nasby. 



Frank D. Colburn of Boston, and stepped an eighth in 
17 seconds last Monday. He is a nice gaited pacer 
and a very promising two-year-old. An own brother 
to this fellow is also a fast prospect. The black two- 
year-old pacer by Educator, dam Hulda by Guide, 
owned by Mr. Henry paced an eighth in 17$ seconds 
one day last week. This fellow is an inbred Director 
and his second dam is that good broodmare Alice R. 
by Naubuc. Selah a stud colt, four years old by Mc- 
Kinney out of Anna by Director trotted a quarter for 
Mr. Henry in 35} seconds the other day. He is owned 
by Mr. G. S. Langan of Haywards. Another very 
promising trotter in this string is John C. Henry, a 
Silver Bow colt that has only been brokenitwo months, 
but is fast. 



Every Zolock colt that is handled seems to show a 
lot of speed. Chas. Farrar, of Santa Ana, who sold 
one to Iowa parties for $2000, says he is the best colt 
he ever handled. Dr. Hazlett, of San Bernardino, 
owns a Zolock filly that can pace a two-minute gait. 
Ned Mosier, the horse shoer, of Los Angeles, has just 
bought a Zolock filly from Judge Shanklin of the 
same place, on account of her natural speed. Will 
Durfee is working three and they are all good ones. 
Mr. Vance has recently purchased a Zolock filly from 
Mr. Cole of San Bernardino that will make a race 
mare. Walter Maben has a sister to the $2000 colt 
that is owned by Mr. Bohan, the hotel man. Mr. 
Prescott, of San Bernardino ha9 a very fast colt by 
Zolock out of the dam of Roan Wilkes 2:12f . Several 
high class mares are already booked to the sire of 
Delilah 2:16A and Ambush 2:20 as two-year-olds. 
Among them are W. O. Bowers' Betsy B. by Silver 
Bee, dam a sister to Mary Lou, dam of Kinney Lou 
2:07$, and M. Silva's pacing mare Polka Dot 2:14} by 
Mendocino. Dr. Himelbaugti, of Salt Lake, has also 
sent a Patchen Wilkes mare out of Angie D. 2:07 to 
Zolock. 

Farmer Bunch wasdown from Pleasanton this week, 
taking ad vantage of the rainy weather which kept 
him off the track, to attend to a little business at the 
metropolis. The Farmer is working an even dozen 
trotters and pacers at Pleasanton track, and says that 
ho only wants the opportunity that meetings offer to 
show the boys that he has several good ones in his 
string. The mare Hattie Croner has fully recovered 
from her severe illness of last year, and Mr. Bunch 
believes she will step below 2:10 this year without 
much trouble. He has recently added to his string a 
bay mare called Petaluma Girl, owned by Mr. Offutt 
of Petaluma, that looks like a fine prospect. She is 
by Lynwood Wilkes 2:20 out of a mare by Anteeo, 
and looks like Sonoma Girl, the fast green trotter 
owned by Mr. J. Springer. Bunch is working several 
Iran Alto colts and fillies that are stepping as if they 
were after first money in the stakes they are entered 
in. They are coming three-year-olds and all worked 
miles better than 2:30 last year in their two-year old 
form. Iran Alto will be one of the leading speed sires 
of the Coast with half a chance in the stud. 



The Leading Son of McKinney. 

The question as to what trotting stallion Is the 
greatest sire is no longer debatable. All recognize 
that McKinney is entitled to that honor and from the 
Atlantic to the Pacific his praises are being sounded 
even by those who were his severest critics a few 
short years ago. 

Now that McKinney is lost to this Coast, breeders 
will look to one of his sons to fill the place he has 
occupied and naturally Zambro's name will be placed 
at the head of the list of those of his sons old enough 
to be sires of the standard performers. Zombro's rec- 
ord of 2:11 would have been reduced at least six sec- 
onds, had the horse not been unfortunate. He had 
the speed, but circumstances prevented his attaining 
that which was within his reach. He was undoubt- 
edly the greatest three-year-old ever seen on the 
Pacific Coast. C. A Durfee is authority for the state- 
ment that a mile in 2:08 was within Zombro'9 reach at 
the close of his three-year-old campaign, during whioh 
he won forty heats in standard time, a feat never be- 
fore or since accomplished by any three-year-old. 

In the stud Zombro ha3 been a decided success. 
He has seven in the list, all square and natural trot- 
ters, the fastest being Zephyr 2:11. a mare that won a 
heat in 2:06$ in a race, but unfortunately for her 
owner, the timers were not in the stand and no time 
was given out. The fastest green trotter that has 
shown this year in California is a Zombro. He is 
owned by Mr. M. A. Murphy of this city, and is in Al 
McDonald's string at Pleasanton. A mile in 2:12 is 
within his reach now. All the young Zombros are 
bays, browns or blacks, solid color and natural trot- 
ters. They are grand lookers like their sire, who is 
beyond all question one of the grandest looking of 
trotting stallions. 

Mr. Geo. T. Beckers, who bred and who still owns 
Zombro, will keep the horse for public service at Los 
Angeles until June 1st this year. Last year Zombro 
was taken Bast, and had a large number of high class 
mares bred to him, but Mr. Beckers thinks California 
is good enough for him as a d welling place and brought 
his horse back, glad to again be at home, where the 
sun shines and the flowers bloom the year round. Mr. 
B. has recently purchased a fine piece of property 
adjoining Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, whereon 
he is building a neat cottage for himself and family, 
and a home for Zombro. He has engaged some fine 
pasture for the mares and will give them every at- 
tention. The service fee for Zombro has been placed 
at the low figure of $50 and breeders should not miss 
the opportunity to ship their mares to him. It will 
be the best investment for the money one can make, 
as a colt or filly by Zombro can be 60ld for a figure 
that will bring a profit as soon as it is foaled. We 
suggest that the advertisement of Zombro be read 
carefully and Mr. Beckers corresponded with for any 
further information. 



Absorbine and Hard Bunches. 



Mr. M. Henry, of Haywards, who has quite a string 
of his own colts and fillies by his stallion Educator, 
working at Pleasanton track, is also handling a few 
young horses owned by others. One of the most 
promising is a colt by Gossiper 2:14}, dam by Algona, 
the sire of Flying Jib 2:04. This colt is owned by Mr. 



The lettbrs which follow tell their own story. The key to all 
successor this kind is patience and perseverance. The meat Id 
the cocoanut In these stories is that hard bunches have been re- 
moved with Absorbine, avoiding the unpleasantness of history: 
New Glasgow, N. S., Feb. 16, 1894. 
W. F. Young. Springfield. Maes. 

Dear Sir:— I have used your Absorbine for swollen tendons 
and windpuffs with results that surprised me. I can also recom- 
mend It as excellent for splints and bony enlargements. Very 
truly yours, John X. Cameron. 

W. F. Young, Springfield, Matt. 

Dear Sir:— 1 have taken off a splint with your Absorbine that 
was on my horse for six months, and am about to try it on ons 
with thick glands. If you can give me special instructions, 
would be pleased to have you do so. Yours truly, 

g. w fitzsimmons. 

Ocean Boulevard and King's Highway, 
Brooklyn, Jnne 18, 1897. 

W. F. Young, Springfield, Matt. 

Dear Sir:— I ,ake" pleasure In endorsing your Absorbine. It 
has entirely removed two ossiletsfrom a promising two-year old 
colt without turning a hair, and left his limbs as clean as ever. 
Very respectfully, John Kelly. 

Absorbine, %i per bottle, express prepaid. 

Address JV. f. YOUNG, P. D. F., Springfield, Mass. 



Bristol, N. H., June 21, 1885. 

Dr. S A. Tutlle, 

Dear Sir:— Having used your Elixir In the different diseases 
In horses, I consider it the best horse medicine In the market. I 
have never failed of obtaining good results In every oase where I 
have used it. Every man owning a horse should have a bottle of 
It in his stable. Yours very truly, G.G.BROWN. 



February 4, 1905] 



5 




Buffalo's $10,000 trot will probably be for the 2:11 
class. 



An advertiser offers a well-bred trotting stallion and 
two draft stallions for sale. . 



Isaac H. Pawling, of Philadelphia, has left for a 
trip to California in search of a McKinney for a 
wealthy Quaker City horseman. 



A high-class son of Electioneer with a fast record is 
for lease on shares to a reliable party who can give 
references. Apply at this office. 



Out of the twenty-one foals older than three-year- 
olds Joe Patchen has sired, fifteen have taken records, 
including the champion Dan Patch 1:57. Old Black 
Joe is a sure enough success in the stud. 



Dr. Russell A. Walker, of Chicago, has purchased 
the two-year-old filly by Neernut 2:12 J out of Hazel 
Kinney 2:09} by McKinney. She is a very promising 
trotter and will be taken East and trained. 



An Eastern exchange states that Mr. A. B. Gwath- 
mey, owner of the famous trotter Tiverton 2:04}, has 
recently recovered from a very severe attack of 
rheumatism as the result of having his afflicted arm 
pin fired. 

A plague of cerebro-spinal meningitis has struck 
the horses of St. Louis, Mo., and several other large 
cities of the South and West. The disease develops 
very rapidly, causes convulsions and severe pain and 
is usually fatal. 

Last Monday was a clear day at Pleasanton and 
about a hundred horses were out on the track, some 
of them showing speed and others being jogged. An 
hour of sunshine after a heavy rain puts this famous 
track in shape for working horses. 



In the article headed "Successful Youog Sire," 
which appeared in last week's B. and S., the name of 
the two-year-old trotter Athasham 2:20 was printed 
instead of Ambush 2:20. Athasham 2-20 is by Geo. L. 
Warlow's stallion Athadon 20990, while Zolock is the 
sire of Ambush. , 



It is announced that D. C. Paltneter, Berlin, Wis , 
has decided not to allow Barongale (2:11 J), the cham- 
pion three and four-year-old trotting colt of 1903 and 
1904 respectively, to perform stud service this season, 
but will have him especially pointed for the Transyl- 
vania next fall. 



The chances for the San Jose ti ack to be leased for 
a period of ten years are not so good as they were a 
few days ago, and the probabilities are that negotia- 
tions between the parties of the first and second parts 
will be broken off. 

Ex-Governor Morgan G. Bulkeley, now United 
States Senator from Connecticut, has for many years 
been prominently identified with harness racing in- 
terests in the far East. He was one of the founders 
of the old Charter Oak Park racing plant in Hartford 
in the early days. 

I learn that C. K. G. Billings intends to visit Cali- 
fornia next month and that he meditates shipping over 
three automobiles and several of his matinee horses 
now at Cleveland, that he may enjoy the drives in 
Golden Gate Park and spin along a little at Santa Rosa 
or Pleasanton. — Percy in New York Telegraph. 



From the quality of material on hand, Charles 
Marvin will spring one or more surprises on the boys 
the coming season. Last year he won a good race 
with Bon Voyage, and subsequently parted with the 
colt for $10,000. He now has a couple of youngsters in 
his stable that look to be every bit as good as the son 
of Expedition. 

Mr. H. McManus, who is located at Pleasanton, 
writes us that there are at least 200 horses work ing on 
the track there. "Mike" says Pleasanton climate 
agrees with him as he has gained fifteen pounds since 
going there. He will have two or three horses to 
work next month, the result of his advertisement in 
the Breeder and Sportsman. 



The Horse Jlevievj says: Sidney 2:19^, the renowned 
grandsire of Lou Dillon 1:58}, takes regular exercise 
at Oregon, 111 , and moves more like a four-year-old 
than a horse twenty years older. The old hero is 
sound and smooth, and the light of youth shines in 
his eyes. He shows little indication of his age and 
seems to be as vigorous as ever. 



The pacing mare Twinkle 2:05} by Mercury 2:21 
will likely be in the stable of Harrie Jones, of Rush- 
ville, Ind., the coming season. Harrie had the Mer- 
cury gelding, Kruger 2:15}, last season, and drove him 
a trial mile at Lexington in 2:05J, then sold him to A. 
McDonald in December. He thinks he will be able to 
retire Twinkle with a mark of 2:03 or better. 



Mr. G. W. Prescott, vice-president of the San Ber- 
nardino County Driving Club, writes us that the stock 
in that county is looking well at the present time. 
He has fourteen horses and colts in training aDd all 
are free from colds or influenza, and taking their 
work well. Mr. Prescott adds. "The North will see 
ua up there in force if the young things keep up their 
present improvement." 



Parties in search of stallions, roadsters or track 
animals would do well to consult our advertising 
columns. Several good horses are advertised thert>. 
If you don't see what you want, ask for it through 
this paper. 

There is much talk at Pleasanton of the new track, 
and the Pleasanton Times is boosting the proposition 
in good shape. Two tracks at Pleasanton would not 
be overdoing the business, as the probability is that 
both would be crowded all winter, although many 
stalls would be empty during the summer season. 



Henry Delaney, who campaigned Zolock last year, 
expects to have that stallion's good daughter Delilah 
2:16}, champion pacing two-jear old of 1904 in his 
string at Los Angeles soon. He already has the Mc- 
Kinney pacer Welcome Mac that won a matinee race 
at Los Angeles last Saturday in 209, 2:08}, reference 
to which is made in another column in this issue. 



William Hashagen, of Woodland, Yolo county, 
writes us that in his opinion there is no doubt but the 
mare Liska by Electioneer, bred at Palo Alto and 
now owned by Henry Cowell, will be the best produc- 
ing daughter of her great sire. Mr. Hashagen writes 
that there is another of her get by Nutwood Wilkes 
now in Hi Hogoboom's string that will be a 2:10 trot-' 
ter. Liska is now the dam of four standard trotters' 
the fastest being the sensational horse Lisonjero 
2:08}. 

Ed Geers has a two-year-old by Onward Silver 2:05}, 
out of Lady Geraldine 2:11}, that should prove stake 
material. As Geers had to do with the parents, it is 
to be hoped he will succeed with the royally bred 
youngsters. It will be recalled that he won the Bon- 
ner Memorial and Massachusetts stakes with Onward 
Silver, also the M. and M. stake, behind Lady 
Geraldine, in 1900. However, he did not train the 
Constantine marefor that event, that honor belonging 
to Ras Ecker. 

John Splan held a good sale in Chicago last month, 
but broodmares and young stock went for low prices. 
"Ready to use" speed seemed to be what the buyers 
were after and they paid fair prices. Button 2:13f, 
the mare by Gold that was campaigned on the Mon- 
tana circuit for the past two years and was unbeaten, 
brought $3200, the highest price of the sale. Irene 
W. 2:14}, the eight-year-old chestnut pacing mare by 
Waldstein, sold for $300, and is now owned by Henry 
Jacobs of Chicago. 

Al McDonald of Pleasanton, who is training Mr. F. 
Gommet's brown two-year-old colt by McKinney re- 
ports that an offer of four thousand dollars was made 
for him last week. This colt is a trotter and reckoned 
by several horsemen as the best trotting propect of 
his age in California. His breeding is top notch, as 
he is out of the yo^ng mare Zorilla by Dexter Prime 
Prince, second dam Lilly Thorn by Electioneer, third 
dam Lady Thorn Jr., dam of Santa Claus 2:17} by 
Williams Mambrino. 

Orville Jones of Los Angeles recently turned down 
an offer of $1000 for a yearling stud colt by Mr. Geo. 
Ford's stallion Neernut 2:12}. It is said that Don M. 
by Neernut is the fastest green trotter on the Los 
Angeles track. He stepped the last quarter of that 
track in 31} seconds recently and it is believed can 
show three heats now around 2:12. He is a full brother 
to Buirnut, the horse Mr. Ford has at Detroit in the 
hands of Frank Colby. Mr. Colby says Burrnut is 
the fastest snow trotter in Michigan. 



Mary Celeste, whose two-year-old record of 2:17} 
was made in 1898 when she was a two-jear old is now 
at the age of nine years, queen of the snow path at 
Pearia, Illinois. She was bred by the late William 
Corbett at San Mateo, and is by Oro Wilkes out of 
Fidelia by Director, and is -therefore a half sister to 
Alex Brown's good stallion Nushagak, sire of Aristo 
2:08}. Mary Celeste is now owned by the Danforth 
Farm, Illinois, that also owns the California bred 
champion Klatawah 2:05} at three years. 



Few horses have been campaigned so severely dar- 
ing four consecutive seasons as famous Effie Powers 
2:08}. Her late owner and driver, Larry Gray, is 
authority for the statement that during the past four 
seasons Etfiie Powers was started in seventy-two 
races, won first money in twenty-nine, second in 
twenty-five, third in ten and fourth in seven. She 
was behind the money only four t.mes in these seventy- 
two races and distanced once. It will be interesting 
to watch the career of the foals that she produces by 
Dan Patch 1:56. 

Hazel Patch, a black gelding by Hard Patch, re- 
duced his record in H04 from 2:12} to 2:05}, and has 
been trained and driven in his races by his owner, 
J. W. Flack of Milwaukee, who has been laughed at 
by other horsemen because he is what they call a 
"freak" trainer. Ho bandages the animal's legs from 
the body down, has placed weights on tho hind as 
well as the forefeet of Hazel Patch, and theso weights 
are of peculiar weight and shape. He never rubs his 
horses after a race and works tnem to the spoed limit 
as soon as he commences training. 



Owners of stallions deserving of liberal patronage, 
says the Western Horseman, have failed to make pro- 
fitable returns on their investments by being afraid of 
"printer's ink." An owner may believe that he has 
a great horse, one that is worthy a liberal patronage, 
and one that would secure a creditable list of standard 
performers if afforded an opportunity, but unless he 
educates the public to a similar belief the stallion will 
prove a failure. Tho owner who causes his stallion to 
bo talked about is the one that has started the horse 
toward popularity. Publicity is the only method 
known among men or "angels," for that matter, that 
will make business good. 



From Kentucky comes intelligence of the death, at 
J. E. Clay's Marchmont Stud, Paris, of the noted 
broodmare Zoraya, by Guy Wilkes 2:15}— Neluska, 
by Sultan 2:24, aged 19. She was the dam of the cele- 
brated filly Katharine A. (4) 2:11}, by Wiggins 2:19}, 
recently exported to Europe, and the winner of the 
two-year-old Kentucky Futurity of 1902 In 2:14, the 
world's record for her sex and age. 



Secretary W. G. Preuitt of the Montana State 
Board of Livestock Commissioners Includes this in 
his official report for 1904. "The shipments of horses 
out of the State during the year 1904 aggiegated 
37,984 head, all of which were inspected by stock in- 
spectors or sheriffs in the counties from which thev 
were shipped. This is a decrease over the previous 
year of about 20,000 head, and the range horses in 
Montana are being pretty thoroughly shipped out." 



Dave McClary's new purchase is ca led Red Pointer. 
He is a gelding by Star Pointer 1:59}, dam Alice M., 
the dam of Red Seal 2:10 In his time McClary has 
sold, green, Elastic Pointer 2:06}. for which he got 
$10,000 on showing a trial of 2:09}: Morning Star 2:04} 
he sold one year ago for $9000, and last August he 
sold the California bred three-year-old Rey Direct 
colt, Rey del Valle, for big money on showing a mile 
at Buffalo in 2:07J. Hs also cold Lord Revelstoke 2:12} 
for $J3,500. 

Lafe Shafer, trainer for Terrace Far ji, Titusville, 
Pa., is wintering several head at Memphis. Among 
the lot is the black filly Zelma by Beauseant (2.06} ); 
Zephyr (4) (2.11 by Zombro (2.11), that every one at 
Memphis is in love with. She is pronounced by Ed. 
Geers to be "one of the best and classiest two-year-old 
he ever saw." This filly has certainly a license to be 
fast as not only is her sire a sensationally fast horse, 
but her dam was also extremely fast and it will be 
remembered was the winner of that memorable heat 
at Hartford in 1902, when the judges claimed not to 
have snapped their watches and no time was hung 
out, but which was caught by numerous watches close 
to the world '8 four-year-old filly record. — American 
Home Breeder. 

Rather than not race him, Snow, who drives Lo- 
canda, would be willing to pit the little son of Allerton 
against almost any pacer, as he has supreme confi- 
dence in the speed and gameness of his pony, and 
when it comes to judging a pacer from every angle, 
Snow is the equal of any man. Locanda beat John 
M. at Syracuse last fall, taking his record of 2:03} in 
that race, and although John M subsequently paced 
to a mark below 2:03, Snow does not think he has any- 
thing on Locanda when (he latter is in order for a 
race. Locanda, by the way, is said to have been bid 
in at a recent Ne n Year auction. "Doc" Tanner, act- 
ing for Mr. Billings, bid something like $5300 for the 
horse, but Locanda's owner was not disposed to let 
him go at that price, and he stayed in Snow's stable 



C. H. Durfee son of C. A. Durfee went to Los 
Angeles last week and returned a day or two ago with 
the stallions Coronado 2:12} by McKinney and Peti- 
gru 2:10} by Kingward, son of Onward. Mr. Durfee 
will keep these stallions at the San Jose track during 
the breeding season and will also have Almaden 2:22} 
as a two-year-old by Direct out of Rose McKinney and 
Galindo, son of McKinney and the great brood mare 
Elsie, in the stud. Coronado which is without doubt 
more like McKinney than any of bis sons and Peti- 
gru will be in the stud at a fee of $50 each. The fee 
for the services of Almaden, winner of last year's 
Occident Stake will be $40 and Galindo will be per- 
mitted to serve a few mares at $30. Mr. Durfee will 
have the greatest quartette of trottiug-bred stallions 
under one management on the coast and breeders 
should be able to select one from them that will be 
the proper nick for almost any mare. 



There is an old story that in one of the old cities of 
Italy tho King caused a bell to be hung in a tower in 
one of the public squares and called it "the bell of 
justice." He then commanded that any one who 
had been wronged should go and ring the bell, and 60 
call the magistrate of the city, and ask and receive 
justice. And when, in the course of time, the lower 
end of the bell-rope rotted away, a wild vine was tied 
to it to lengthen it; and one day an old and starving 
horse that had been abandoned by its owner and 
turned out to die, wandered to the tower, and, in try- 
ing to eat the vine, rang the bell. And the magistrate 
of the city, coming to see who rang the bell, found 
this old and starving horse; and he caused the owner 
of that horse, in whose service ho had toiled and been 
worn out, to be summoned before him, and decreed 
that, as his poor horse had rung the bell of justice, he 
should have justice, and that during the remainder of 
the horse's life his owner should provide for him 
proper food and drink and stable.— Dumb Animals. 

When General Nogi admired General/ Stoessel's 
Arab horse after the fall of Port Arthur and the 
Russian commander promptly presented tho animal 
to his conqueror, the generous act increased the feel- 
ing of admiration which all the world has felt for the 
bravo defender of the fortress which eight months of 
vigorous land siege forced him to surrender. The 
cable dispatches do not say that the horse was the 
general's favorite steed, nor do they tell how much 
use Stoessel made of him during the long weeks of 
almost hopeless resistance. But Port Arthur's defenses 
extended over maDy miles, and tho animal undoubtedly 
did his part in carrying its commander from point to 
poif t in his daily tour of inspection. General Stoessel 
patted tho horse's neck in farewell as he turned him 
over to the Japanese, showing that be had the affec- 
tion which every general has for the animal that car- 
ries him through a campaign. General Nogi promised 
that the horse should receive tho best of care and at- 
tention, and in Japan, where pood horses aro raro, tho 
animal will probably become tho equine hero of the 
war. — Kentucky Stock Farm. 



[February 4, 1905 



LOS ANGELES MATINEE. 



Welcome Mack by McKinney Paces Two Heats 
Below 2.10. 



Forced finishes and phenomenal time— the fastest 
ever hung out at the Driving Club meeting— featured 
last Saturday's midwinter matinee at Agricultural 
Park. 

Id the dead of the calendar winter; on the twenty- 
eighth day of January when the telegraph is telling 
its frigid tales of the ice-fettered East — when horse- 
men beyond the Rockies are bundled up in furs taking 
occasional spins through the knife-sharp air in their 
cutters and living in hopes of the warmer months to 
come — when the "hot-stove circuit" is going down 
the "big ring" again— does it seem possible that with- 
in the confines of the same country in Southern Cali- 
fornia, a coterie of harness horse lovers and their 
friends could be complaining of the noonday warmth 
as they sat through two race miles, the one in 2:09 and 
the other in 2:08$? 

Yet these things were done, and more. In the pres- 
ence of many Eastern reinsmen each delighted with 
what he saw, the Driving Club successfully brought 
of the greatest afternoon's spo.-u in its history, and 
literally bathed itself in glory. Had two dollars ad- 
mission been charged and the show branded "profes- 
sional" none could have complained that full value re- 
ceived was not given. 

Out of a programme liberally studded with good 
things all worthy of note, the free-for all pace stood 
out, pre-eminent by virtue of the unprecedented per- 
formance of Ed. Delorey's brown gelding, Welcome 
Mack, who completely outclassed the other coo ten- 
ants for Byron Erkenbrecher's cup. Going to the 
half in 1 :04 after a lively pace set by Dr. Bryson's bay, 
Toughnut, Delorey let his prize out a notch and suc- 
ceeded in settiDg a new track record for Agricultural 
Park at 2:09— a figure that endured just half an hour 
before the doughty blacksmith took another fall out 
of his own work by establishing 2:08J as a mark for 
future owners of matinee pacers to shoot at. Neither 
Toughnut or Bruner's promising youngster, Stanton 
Wilkes, had any business in that kind of a race; Wel- 
come Mack pace^ as if he were jogging along in a 
workout, and came through the stretch with the easy 
swing of a scared jackrabbit by virtue of his victory. 
Mr. Delorey now shares the honors of Dr. C Bryson 
and W. M. Bartee, all three having two legs each on 
the Erkenbrecher cup. 

"Every heat a race" is a common expression in 
pool selling, but most rare in performance. Yesterday 
not only did the rule work to i„s words, but also every 
race was a race in fact, as well as in name; extra heats 
were required in two, and most of the rest were not 
decided until the drivers had passed the stand. J. H. 
Mitchel started the day by winning the new cup for 
the 2:30 trotters, taking the trophy with Albuquerque 
in straight heats. The five-handed debate for the 
Garland Cup proved every bit as exciting as had been 
predicted, and eventually resulted in a well-earned 
victory for William A. Clark, Jr , who signalized b | 
admission to the club by winning the first race he ever 
drove in a matinee. 

All hats came oil to John Reynolds after the fourth 
race had been driven off, for Reynolds had accom- 
plished a feat vouchsafed to no other man — not even 
Pop Henderson. He won two successive heats with 
Rozelle— the "pink gelding"of the programme. This 
Bturdy, homely old gray has long borne quite a repu- 
tation among local horsemen as a finisher, but his 
consistent unsteadiness has always shut him out of 
serious reckoning and classed him as one of those 
horses which are likely to win in 2:16 and be distanced 
in 2:28. Just what prescription Mr. Reynolds used 
on the old fellow he refused to state, but the Arabian 
talisman worked like Dr. Bryson's boot protectors, 
and Rozelle came through with the goods in a driving 
finish each time. 

The free-for-all trot bringing out Henry Berry with 
Briney K. and Dr. Ralph Hagan with Byron Erken 
brecker's pet Rita H. attracted the closest of atten- 
tion as it was labeled a sure enough horse race in 
advance. Rita was generally liked to win, and she 
started well by taking the first heat in 2:13* after 
collaring Briney and making him chuck it up in the 
stretch. The third leg of the Christopher Cup looked 
very dubious to Berry at that stage of the game, but 
a bad break by Rita H. at the turn in the second heat 
practically settled the race as Dr. Hagan committed 
the fatal "error of judgment of coming on and trying 
to win. The mare was game and made a brave bid, 
but it was asking too much of her, and she was "all 
in" for the third heat, finishing far behind after 
another tried break soon after the start. 

The 2:25 pace brought out five likely youngsters, 
and the dark horse — or to be exact, the brown mare-— 
won. C. A. Canfield, the man who says little but 
schemes much, has unearthed a very good one in Cloe 



and put her first cup to her credit yesterday, defeat, 
iog Dr. Dodge's colt Lohengrin, Berry 's Willie Jib, 
H. J. Myors' Gladys M. and P. B. Michel's Big Don — 
a quartet very well thought of by matinee enthusiasts. 

The novelty race was not decided until the night 
shift headed by "Dick" Bundrem reported for work. 
The afternoon's sport summarized as follows: 

Race one, 2:30 trot, Club Cup: J. H. Mitchel's c h 
Albuquerque (Mitchel), 1-1; L. P. Keller's ch m Glen- 
nita (Keller), 2-3; B. F. McKlhany's b h Red Ray 
(McElhany), 3-2. Time-2:27, 2:27. 

Race two, 2:20 pace, Garland Cup: W.A.Clark's 
blk h Daniel J. (Clark), 4-1-1; E. R. Guirado's bg 
Cas c y (P. B. Michel), 1-5-5; G. A. Pounder's s g Glen 
(Pounder), 5-2-2; C Cleveland's s m Virginia (Cleve- 
land), 2-3-3; J. G. McGinnis' br g Athais (McGinnis). 
Time— 2:143, 2:10, 2:15. 

Race three, free-for-all pace, Erkenbrecher Cup: 
E. J. Delorey's br g Welcome Mack (Delorey;, 1-1; 
Dr. C. W. Bryson's b g Toughnut (Bryson), 3-2; A. 
W. Bruner's s h Stanton Wilkes ( Bruner), 2-3. Time 
—2:09, 2:08$. 

Race four, 2:25 trot, Club Cup: J. H. Revnolds' 
g g Rozelle (C. Reynolds) 1-1; W. S. MeGiffert's bg 
Geo. Anderson (McGiffert). 2-3; W.A.Clark's blk n 
Master Delmar (Clark), 3-2; E. J. Delorey's b m Al- 
cetia (Delorey), 4-4. Time— 2:18}, 2:17$. 

Race fl ve, free-for-all trot, Christopher's Cup: W. 
H. Berry's b g Briney K. (Berry), 2-1-1; B. Erken- 
brecher's br m Rita H. (Hagan), 1-2-2. Time — 2:13}. 
2:17ii, 2:19$. 

Raca six, 2:24 pace, Club Cup: C. A. Canfield's br 
m Cloe (Canfield), 1-1; Dr. William Dodge's b g 
Lohengrin (Dodge), 2-2; W. H. Berry's b g Willie 
Jib (Berry). 3-3; H. J. Myers' s m Gladys M (Myers), 
4-4; P. B. Michel's b g Big Don (Michel), 5-5. Time— 
2:18, 2:18^. 

Race seven, 2:30 pace, W. H. Berry Cup: Gaorge L. 
Pierce's b m Laura G. (Pierce), 1-1; A. J. Munn's blk 
g Black Jim (RedDath), 2-2; M. B. Mosher's b g 
Artesia (Mosher), 3-3. Time— 2:29, 2:27$.— Los Ange- 
les Times. 

Race Horse Speed Sires. 

[Winfield James in Kentucky Stock Farm.] 
Some four or five years ago the revised table given 
below was wrought out and published in the Kentucky 
Stock Farm. Its object was to supplv, as nearly as 
mathematics can do, a demonstration from turf 
statistics of the greatest sire of racehorse speed in 
the light-harness family. Asa fair measure of speed 
of this class, 2:25 trotting and 2:10 pacing was adoptec'i 
the two being accepted as equivalents. All sires with 
as many as forty in standard time, and as many as 
five in the faster classification, are designed to be 
embraced, it being necessary to fix some definite limit 
to keep the table in compass, and to take in only those 
to be counted as belonging to the greatest. The 
highest value of the table undoubtedly lies in the 
estimated per cent of race horse performers shown as 
coming from the total in standard time produced by 
the various sires included, as given in the last line. 
The order in wh'ch sires are given is determined by 
this, as indicating their relative rank as producers of 
race hor6e performers. It unquestionably would be 
estetmed a perfectly fair basis of comparison between 
sires, if all their get frcm mares supposed capable of 
throwing speed could be ascertained, and the exact 
number put in training and developed for speed could 
be determined, and then balanced up in mathematical 
proportion. But such facts are clearly, in the majority 
of cases, wholly inaccessible, and all attempts to make 
computations from the relative ages of sires, their 
years in the slud and their opportunities equally balk 
and defy the statistician. The one thing given, and 
the only that is reliable, is the official list of per- 
formers making records as fast as standard time, 2:30 
trotting and 2:25 pacing. And this, on the whole, 
serves very well the purposes of comparison desired, 
as it is a fair indication of the number any sire has 
produced that money and pains sufficient fairly to 
develop have been expended upon. While no measure 
at all, so far as the possession of speed for racing uses 
goes, the standard list serves to show very well the 
number actually worked to an extent worth consider- 
ing, and is a good starting point to reckon a sire's 
real speed producing ability from. 

And as a sire should be valued in versely according 
to the total number produced in throwing one capa- 
ble of becoming barely a 2:30 performer, so should he 
be valued inversely according to the number going 
slower than 2:15 trotting or 2:10 pacing to get one in 
the faster, or race horse class. It is perhaps the case 
that a few owners still cling to the notion that a 2:30 
trotter or 2:25 pacer is fast enough, and that if their 
stallion can roll up enough of these each year to be 
heralded as "leading sire of the year" by this test, 
that that is glory sufficient, and so work tooth and 
toe-nail simply for these slow performers. But such 
are very few, and while they add some dead timber to 
the standard list of sires they own, yet they do not 
hinder performers of real merit sired by their horses 
from going on and taking credit in faster classes, and 
their hurrah and push serves to make sure that no 
one with the least chance of going fast fails for want 
of opportunity. So, after all, even sires with the 



worst padded standard lists may be accounted as hav- 
ing advantage sufficient in having everything worked 
that shows any speed at all to make up for the poor 
ones brought forward that can be barely squeezed 
and wriggled into the list. Then in the get of every 
sire there are some naturally of slow development 
that are discarded by others 6omewhat hastily, that 
these determined and persistent pushers to get a long 
list hold on to and eventually make something out of. 
Horses so handled assuredly have decided advantage 
over the larger class that are left entirely to scratch 
for themselves to get any performers, depending 
wholly upon outside and disinterested parties handling 
their get and making their credits for them. A large 
band of choice mares in a homo harem, a heavy purse 
to pay all bills with, and a princely driver to handle 
the reins of every foal count for not a little, though, 
for some reason, some of the foremost sires in this 
table won their places without having had these ad 
ventitious circumstances to aid them. 

It is worthy special remark, and speaks for the 
soundness of the principle on which the proportion 
basis is rested, that though many of the sires con- 
tained in it have increased theirnumberslargely their 
per cent in the faster classification has remained 
about the same, and their relative position little 
altered. McKinney 2:11}, who headed the first table 
with then only thirty in standard time, and a per cent 
of 33:3 of the fastest order, has maintained his posi- 
tion each year in the lead, with, at the close of 1904, a 
total of sixty-five performers, and a per cent of 44 6 of 
fast ones. Baron Wilkes 2:18, at that time second in 
raDk, with a total of ninety-two and a per cent of 22.5, 
holds third place now with a list of 120 and a per cent 
of 20 8 fast ores, the good young sire Prodigal 2:16 
having supplanted him with fifty in all and a per cent 
of 22. Patron 2:14} also has come forward for a place, 
as also have Anderson Wilkes 2:22} and Direct 2:05$ 
not then entitled to a place. Chimes, Mambrino King 
and Simmons have increased their proportion of fast 
ones and gone up in rank, as oave many others less 
conspicuously. The youngest sire at present em- 
braced is Expedition 2:15^ at fifteen years of age, with 
a list of forty-four and a per cent of 15 9, with next 
McKinLey 2:11} and Bow Bells 2.19}, both aged seven- 
t en, the ages given at the close of last season's work, 
1904. It is, probably on the whole, a little severer 
test to maintain the higher per cent when the number 
of performers has increased, though McKinney has 
each year ad van eed his proportion with his growing 
list and as Chimes and some others, and the holders 
of big numbers, like Onward, Red Wilkes, Alcantara 
and Gambetta Wilkes, have held their own and more. 
There is stronger argument that there has been a 
decided advance through the years of race horse 
speed, in the family, than any attempts at comparison 
with a Maud S. 2:08J performance can furnish, and 
the showing made by leading sires is most assuring. 
The horse has still to appear, of course, that will pro- 
duce a king-pin performer in every foal, but when a 
horse gets twenty-nine of Grand Circuit calibre out of 
sixty-five trained to go in racing classes, as did Mc- 
Kinney, breeders and developers are not going to 
break up handling them. And while he is the highest 
blossom on the topmost bough, the tree is rapidly ad- 
vancing and there are others coming on that may be- 
fore hardly realized be close up, or beside him. The 
results are just comitg to realization of the richer 
breeding, and the more rigid selections made in thete 
later years. 



NAMES AND RECORDS 



McKinney 2:11^ 

Prodigal 2:16 

Baron Wilkes 2:18 

Patron 2: MX 

Chimes 

Anderson Wilkes2:22K-- 

Direct (p) 2:054 

Mambrino King 

Simuions 2:28 

Guy Wilkes i:\h\i , 

Brown Hal 2:124 

Shadelanil Onward 2:lfc4 

Expedition 2:15^ 

Bow Bell»2:19M 

Wilton 2:lfli< 

Robert McGregor 2:1?4.. 

Steinway »:2b% 

Eagle Bird 2:21 

Wilkes Boy 2:844 

Axtell 2:12 

Alcyone 2:27 

Altamont 2 26X 

Anteeo 2:l«4 

Ashland Wilkes 2: \7H ... . 

Stamboul2:0?4 

Patchen Wilkes 2:894-... 

Dexier Prince 

C. P. Clay 2:18 

Onward 2:2. r >X 

Gambetta Wilkes 2: 19>4 . . 

Director 2: 17« 

Jersey Wilkes ' 

Allerion 2:(19J£ 

Pilot Medium 

Alcantara 2:23 

Young Jim 

Elyr'B 8:254. 

Red Wilkes 

Jay Bird 

Rourbon Wilkes 

Sphinx 2:204 

Electioneer 

Norval 2:14« 

Sidney 2:19ȣ 



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February 4, 1905 1 



Cite gtcettev cmi* Stporaamati 



7 



|! THOROUGHBREDS. I| 

One of the closest finishes of the meeting at Emery- 
ville was on Wednesday last between Southern Lady, 
I'm Joe and Abe Meyer two year-olds, and it was 
only when the numbers flew up that the onlookers 
could tell which had won. I'm Joe is probably the 
smallest galloper that ever appeared before our race, 
goers, being considerably under fifteen hands in 
height and weighing something like 800 pounds. He 
is the first of the get of Joe Terry to race, and as 
there are a number of promising youngsters by the 
Flambeau horse around Woodland, it is more than 
probable that T. P. Schwartz has in him a very high- 
class sire. Joe Terry is a half-brother to the most 
successful stallion, imp. Brutus, both being from imp. 
Teardrop by Scottish Chief. Terry is by Flambeau 
(son of Wildidle and imp. Flirt, by the Derby-winner 
Hermit), therefore bred on the most fashionable lines. 
Brutus was sired by McGregor, winner of the Two 
Thousand Guineas. Of the two I most fancy the 
breeding of Joe Terry. I'm Joe is an equine toper, 
being as used to his morning "horn" as any member 
of the human family, and he will take his whisky 
either from a tablespoon or from a bottle, but it 
must be forthcoming or there is trouble in the 
Schwartz barn. Perhaps this love of "booze" has 
stunted I'm Joe's growth, but at any rate it hasn't 
affected either his speed or 6toutness of heart. 

Greenock's win of last Wednesday was most satis, 
factory to bis owner, James Woods, who will now 
probably retire the grand old racer to the stud, where 
I predict he will make a great name for himself. He 
is a magnificent individual, a rich brown in color, and 
has won close to forty races in his day. Greenock is 
one of the very few Bramble horses on this Coast, 
Abalanzar being the only other one that I can call to 
mind. The stud success of Ben Brush, son of Bramble, 
has been phenomenal, and he is bred much as is 
Greenock. The latter won several stakes in the 
far East and Middle West in the colors of John F. 
Schorr, of Memphis, and last season at Los Angeles, 
Greenock defeated some of the best horses at Los 
Angeles and ran a number of very creditable races at 
nearly all distances. 

The turf situation in the Middle West and South 
has taken a curious turn. It now looks as if there 
would be no war; that the Western Jockey Club 
would take the "outlaw" ban off all the men and 
horses that participated at Union Park, St. Louis, 
and let horsemen go into either the American Jockey 
Club fold or race with them, as they see fit to do. 
Capt. P. J. Carmody of Union track, declares the 
Corrigan side (the American Jockey Clnb) holds the 
whip hand, and that the Western Jockey Club will 
aoon be but an unpleasant memory. Advices from St. 
Louis are to the effect that the Captain and his friends 
would have gone to $150,000 for the track if forced to 
do so, and when they secured the plant for $70,000 
there was a regular wine feast at Carmody 's place on 
Eighth street. The proposed repeal of the breeders' 
law in Missouri makes the Cella- Adler-Tilles crowd 
quake in their boots, but Capt Carmody says he has 
no doubt but that there will be racing in the Mound 
City under some sort of law. I believe the new law 
will curtail racing to thirty days per year over any 
particular track. The latest news from St. Louis is 
to the effect that Phil Chew is anxious to turn Kinloch 
Park over to the Carmody forces, and this would in- 
dicate there is a feeling among the "Magnates" in 
Missouri that the racing cloud has no silver lining. 
Mr. Chew has been identified with Cella, Adler and 
Tilles up to this time, and his change of heart might 
mean that he was desirous of "getting even" for some 
wrong or was still identified with the Mafia and de- 
sired to sell a gold brick to Capt. Carmody and his 
confreres. A meeting of the American Jockey Club 
is called for February 4th in the Monadnock building, 
Chicago, at which time officers will be elected and 
the adoption of laws governing the new body come up 
for passage. 

James Blute brought these horses up from Ascot 
Park on the 25th of January to race at Emery ville 
and these were Sais, Tramoter and Cincinnatus. Up 
to Thursday of this week, Sais had started four times, 
winning twice and being second the same number of 
times. Tramoter's record was three starts running 
respectively third, 3econd and first. Cincinnatus ran 
four times, winning once. If all horses ran as con- 
blstently as those of Mr. Blute there would be few 
bookmakers left to operate at local tracks. 

The $10,000 Burns Handicap is down for decision 
next today, and as a muddy track is now assured, 
It looks as if Claude, even with 137 pounds, would win 



the big race. W. R. Condon, with 111 lbs. looks to 
have a chance. Dainty has been declared it is under- 
stood, also Schoolmate, who has been goiDg great 
guns at Los Angeles. Horatius has a chance with 
109 lbs. up, for he ran a remarkable race in the Ascot 
Handicap the other day, winding up a good thiid 
after being twelfth at the half-mile ground. 

Ralph H. Tozer 



From Los Angeles. 

The meeting here is now just half finished and up 
to date has been an unqualified success; never before 
in the history of winter racing in California Las there 
been such an exceptionally good lot of horses brought 
together nor have the horses run closer to form than 
they have this season at Ascot Park. The result of 
this has been very disatrous to the bookmakers and 
several bank rolls have faded away to nothing. Many 
bookmakers have laid off from time to time and again 
tried their luck but always with the same result and 
it is a matter of record that no book now doing busi- 
ness in the ring is winner toany extent worth mention- 
ing. 

Morris McKight, who has been assistant to Starter 
Dick Dwjer for several years, will do the starting at 
the Oaklawn track at Hot Springs. Before leaving the 
Ascot Park track the jockeys and trainers presented 
him with a handsome diamond horseshoe scarf pin. 

Last Saturday the Ascot Handicap, the richest 
stake of the meeting, was run off and the race was 
worth going miles to see. The field that went to the 
barrier was without doubt the classiest bunch that 
ever breasted the tape on this side of the continent. 

The McLaughlin stable consisting of Oxford and 
Pasadena was installed favorite at twos and remained 
at those odds throughout, notwithstanding the heavy 




Piquante by Flambeau. 
A Napa Stock Farm Matron. 



play on its chances. The others were held at an 
average of sixes, although Bra^g, Nitrate, Horatius 
and the Yeager entry went to the post at long odds. 
Starter Holtman caught, them in line almost im- 
mediately after they arrived at the post and got them 
away to a perfect start; Pasadena at once went to the 
front and closely followed by Oxford set a heart break 
ing pace, running the first six furlongs in 1 : 1 3 J atd 
the mile in 1:39$; here Pasadena dropped out of it, 
and Oxford took up the running, finishing the mile 
and a quarter in 2:06. Schoolmate made a most de- 
termined challenge the last eighth, but was unable to 
get up, although Oxford had to be band ridden the 
closing strides to beat him a long head. Horatius and 
Requiter fought it out for the show money a length 
behind the leaders, the verdict going to the former 
by a head. Then came Pasadena, High Chancellor, 
Flo Bob, Fossil, Bragg, Glisten, Sidney C. Love. 
Watercuroand Nitrate. Oxford's performance was 
a most brilliant one, and stamps him a high class 
three-year-old ; he was conceding all the way from 
ten to thirty five pounds to first class horses over' a 
distance of ground early in the year and had little 
difficulty in disposing of them. Oxford's victory in 
this stake put his ownor, James McLaughlin, well in 
the load of winning owners up to date. 

Jockey Fuller seems to have recovered the form 
displaced by him two years ago and is now riding up 
to his former high standard of 1903. Speaking of 
jockeys, Tod Sloan says that "Pudden McDaniel, the 



eighty-pound boy now riding here, is the greatest turf 
find of the season and the most promising rider in 
America." "McDaniel," he said recently to a frienc", 
"reminds me of Danny Maher, he crouches far up on 
a horse's withers and has good control of his horse's 
head. He seldom, if ever, uses his whip and this is a 
good trait in a youngster as they are inclined to use 
the whip too freely. He is alert at the post and in a 
finish has often made Hilderbrand, the leading jockey, 
of last season look like a novice. I have an option 
on a two-year-old contract with Pudden's father." 

The jockey is a grandson of Col. McDaniel, the 
trainer of Harry Bassett and other great borees that 
Jimmy Ro /re used to ride when a boy. 

The steeple chases and hurdle races, of which one or 
more have been given weekly of late could be elimin- 
ated from the program and their loss would not be 
felt; speaking from either a speculative or a specta- 
cular point of view. There are no jumpers here 
worthy of the name and their numbers are so few that 
practically the same field goes to the post in each 
event. Ihe only novelty being that on each occasion 
there is a different favorite which generally succeeds 
in winning with a well backed second choice in the 
place. George B. Kelley. 

Pony Races Declared Oft. 

San Francisco, Cal., Ian. 31, 1905. 

Editor Breeder & Sportsman: In consequence 
of Saturday next being thedato for the decision of the 
Burn's Handicap it has been decided to declare off the 
postponed Matinee of the California Polo and Pony 
Racing Association on that date. The events sched- 
uled will, however, be decided this week prior to the 
commencement of the Polo Matches 

The Association is already making preparations for 
the mee ing to be given at Ingleside on February 22, 
Mr. Thos. H. Williams having kindly placed that 
Race Course at the disposal of the Association, the 
proceeds of which are to be divided between the 
Woman's Hospital and the Armitage Orphanage. 
The feature event of the afternoon's sport will be a 
two-mile Steeple Chase to be ridden by members of 
the Association on hunters that have been qualified 
with the San Mateo hounds this season. 

Yours truly, 

Robert Leighton, Sec. 



Brighton Handicap Weights. 

The weights for the Brighton Handicap, 1905, are 
as follows: Hermis 128 pounds, Irish Lad 126, Ort 
Wells 124, Delhi 123, Stalwart 123, Beldame 122,. The 
Picket 122, Broomstick 119, Bryn Mawr 119, Mc- 
Chesney 119, Africander 118, Lord of the Vale 117, 
Goldsmith 117, Hurst Park 116, English Lad 116, Fort 
Hunter 115, Santon 115, Runnels 114, Dainty 113, 
Major Daingerfield 113, Bondage 112, Dolly Spanker 
111, Alan-a-Dale 111, Tokalon 110, Moharib 109. Gra- 
ziallolOS, Burleigh 108, Ad bell 108, Pulsus 108, Sy- 
sonby 108, Monsieur Beaucaire 106, Israelite 105, Con- 
jurer 104, Tradition 104, Knight Errant 104, Artful 
103, Jocund 102, Tanya 102, Glorifi3r 100, Miss Craw- 
ford 100, Witfull 100, Jason 100, Dreamer 100, Little 
Em 100, St. Bellane 99, Ivan the Terrible 99, Ram's 
Horn 98, Sandria 97, May M. 97, Rose oT Dawn 95, 
Bedouin 95, Siglight 93, Marmee 92, Merry Lark 92, 
Ostrich 90, Bartender 90, Phaser 87. 

Track is Frozen at Hit Springs. 

Hot Springs, Ark., Feb. 2— On account ol a 
frozen track the races at Essex Park were today 
declared off. The Kentucky Club stakes will be run 
tomorrow, but all other entries will be decli.rcd off. 



Horsemen throughout the West have received let- 
ters from the New Orleans Jockey Club, slating that 
stakes to which entr ies had been made are void, and 
that within the next few days a new list of events 
would be announced. Racing will begin at Panama 
Park on Saturday, February 11. 

Increase Your Horse's Value 

By preserving Its health and ke< ping It constantly In (he pink or 
condition. Ordinary thougbtfulness concerning ihe diet of th a 
noble creature will accomplish much In Ihe direction above sug- 
gested. Pure food and water given at regular hours (■hould be 
remembered. There are. however, germ diseases whosecontagion 
Is not resisted by the most careful feeder. The Wells Medicine 
Co of Lafayette, Ind , have for many years supplied horsemen 
through druggists and direct from their factory a sure preventive 
against the geim piaguo in its many Hums, such as distemper, 
pinkeye. Influenza, epizootic, catarrh, colds etc., in their famous 
Craft's Distemper & Cough .Cure, the price of which 1m refunded If 
It falls to eure. It Is wiser to always use It regularly us a pre- 
ventive. 

P. H. McEvoy of Monlo Park is offoring two hard- 
Bono Prince Airli'e stallions for sale— Milbrae (trot- 
ting record 2: 16A ; and Menlo Boy 3741. For particu- 
lars see advertisement. *tf 



The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms, private baths, telephone, 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 



5Mte gireefter an* gspoirtentan 



ROD, GUN AND KENNEL. 

Wa Conducted by J. X. I>e WITT. 



Coming Events. 

Kod. 

Jan. 1-July 1— Close season for black bass. 

April 1-Sept. 10. Oct. 16-Feb. 1— Open season for taking stoel- 
nead in tidewater. 

Aug. I5-April 1— Open season for lobsters and crawfish. 

Sept. 1-May 1— Open season for shrimp. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 18 -Close season in tidewater for steelhead. 

Sept. 10-Oct. 16— Close season for catching salmon. 

Oct. 16-Nov. 15— Close season for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Nov. 1-April 1— Trout season closed. 
Nov. 1-Sept. 1— Open season for crabs. 

Nov. 15-Sept. 10— Season open for taking salmon above tide 
water. 

Can. 

Feb. 22— Blue rock tournament. Ingleside grounds. 
March 5— California Wing Club. Live pigeons. Ingleside. 
May 5, 6, 7— Los Angeles Gun Club. Blue rock tournament, 
Sherman grounds. 
July 1-Feb. 15— Dove season open. 

Sept. 1-Feb. 15— Open season for mountain quail, grouse and 
jage hen. 

Oct. 15-Feb. 15— Open season .'or quail, ducks, etc. 
Nov. 1-July 15— Deer season closed. 

liench Shows. 

Jan. 24. 26 Rhode Island Kennel Club. Providence, R. L H. 
M. French, Secretary. 

Jan. 25,28— National Fanciers and Breeders Association. 5th 
annuaishow. Chicago. W. K. L. rules. T A. Howard, Superin- 
tendent. Chicago, Ills. 

Feb 1, 2— Collie Breeders' Association. Inaugural show. Chi- 
cago. L. A. Woodward, Secretary. 

Feb. 13, 16— Westminster Kennel Club. New York City. Robt. 
V. McKim, Secretary. James Mortimer, Superintendent. 

Feb. 21,24— New England Kennel Club. Boston, Mass. Wm. B. 
Emery. Secretary. H E. Gero, Show Secretary. 

March 2, 3, 4— Colorado Kennel Club. Denver, Col. John David- 
son, Judge 

March 8, 11— Duquesne Kennel Club of Western Pennsylvania 
Pittsburg, Pa. Fred'k S. Stedman, Secretary. 

March 21, 24— Buffalo KennelClub, Seymour P. White. Secretary. 

March 29-Apr. 1— Long Island Kennel Club. Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Jos. M Dale, Secretary. 

April 19, 22— Atlantic City Kennel Club. Atlantic City,'. N.J. 
Thos. H. Terry, Secretary. 

May 10, 13— San Francisco Kennel Club show. Mechanics' Pa- 
vilion, San Francisco. 

Field Trials. 

Oot. 30— American Field Futurity Stake. For Pointers and 
Setters whelped on or after January 1, 1904, whose dams have 
been duly qualified. Am. Field Publishing Co., Chicago. 



On Performing Dogs. 

Scientific investigation reveals that the dog was the 
first animal domesticated by man. In the dim ages 
before wriUen history commences, pre-historic man 
bad tamed the dog, whoever since has been the friend 
and servant of man. The training of dogs for public 
performance is not so ancient, for that came about a 
few thousand years later; still it can boast a very 
respectable antiquity, and that performances by ani- 
mals, including the dog, were favorite amusements of 
the ancient Greeks and Romans, is known to every 
student from the frequent allusions made to such 
entertainments in the writings of classic authors. 
During the Middle Ages animal performers were vastly 
popular in every civilized land, and to the present 
day afford entertainment and instruction to the 
people of every county "from China to Peru." In 
England such entertainments are increasingly popu- 
lar, and scarcely a month passes in London but that a 
new dog "turn" forms an attractive item in the pro- 
grams of one or other of our chief theaters of varieties, 
states the English Kennel Gazette. At the present 
moment such performances are nightly given at 
three of the principal West End establishments, 
and to these theators visits were made in order 
to learn something of the methods employed 
in training dog3 for public performance, and to 
describe tbe performances themselves for the 
benefit of our readers. In carrying out this inten- 
tion we have received kind assistance from Mr. 
Charles Morton, of the Palace Theater; Mr. Frank 
Allen, the general manager, and Mr. Henry W. 
Garrick, of the London Hippodrome, and Mr. Philip 
Yonke, of the Tivoli, all o: whom at their respective 
places of entertainment, were good enough to arrange 
for interviews with trainers. 

Before speaking of each individual performance, it 
may be well to summarize one or two impressions 
which we received from these interviews. In the first 
place, the performances themselves, like all other 
mundane things, have undergone modification. For- 
merly the stage was filled with a troupe of dogs, each 
with his own part to play in some trick or interlude. 
The tendency nowadays is for one dog only to be used, 
and. although Mr. Herbert's entertainment at the 
Hippodrome is given by a troupe of highly-trained 
dogs, in each of the other three entertainments we 
have to describe, one dog only occupies the stage. 
"George"," in our interview with him, stated that it is 
much more difficult to train one dog to go through an 
acceptable performance than to train many, as the 
tax upon the memory of a single dog is greater, and 
we readily believe it. 

Many people have the idea that in the case of all 
'performing animals cruelty is the medium by which 
the performers are made to entertain the audience. 
In the past this was undoubtedly true. It is not so 
lung ago chat learning was imparted to our boys and 
girls by the aid of the stick, but we doubt whether in 



many cases such methods are in vogue now, either in 
dealing with children or with animals. It is certainly 
not the case in any of the performances we are about 
to mention. The dog is particularly responsive to 
kind treatment. Any observant eye, especially one 
quickened with sympathy for dumb animals, will soon 
detect whether cruelty has been, or is being used, and 
dogs especially will exhibit unmistakable signs of the 
treatment accorded them. It is easy to distinguish 
between the dog which performs from fear. 

From each interview we gathered that there is no 
breed of dogs that cannot be taught to perform tricks, 
though, as in the human race, various members of 
the same breed vary greatly in their sagacity and 
ability to receive instruction. 

At the present time Great Danes, Wolfhounds, 
St. Bernards and other large breeds are being em- 
ployed upon the stage, but the trainer generally pre- 
fers the smaller varieties, for among other reasons 
that they are more attractive, and more agile, and, 
especially in the case of troupes of dogs, occupy less 
room upon the stage. There also appears to be a 
general, though not. unanimous, opinion amoDg 
trainers that thoroughbreds are not usually so in- 
telligent as crossbreeds, and the latter are therefore 
more frequently employed. This, of course, only ex- 
emplifies the physical law with regard to in-breeding, 
inter marriage with blood relations frequently pro- 
ducing similar want of mental alertness and capacity 
in the human race. Our first visit was paid a few 
weeks ago to the Palace Theater, where a remarkable 
performance was given by Mr. Michael Braham and 
his dog Mickey In this case there was none of the 
paraphernalia to which one is accustomed in exhibi- 
tions of performing animals, and the whip, or indeed 
any implements of correction, as in all other perfor- 
mances we shall mention, was conspicuous by its 
absence. Mickey, who acted with Mr. Braham, is a 
white B-ill Terrier with quite fair points judged from 
the show bench standpoint. Briefly, the following 
comprised the performance: 

On the curtain rising Mr. Braham walked on to the 
stage, stating that he was expecting an assistant, who 
had failed to put in an appearance. A ring at the 
bell and the door opened. Mickey walked in most 
demurely, with a letter in her mouth, which her 
master took. While breaking the seal, he, in a con- 
versational manner, remarked that it was usual to 
shut the door after one, which Mickey, walking over 
to the door, immediately did. 

After this Mr. Braham talked to the bitch in a 
quiet way upon several matters, and she, in the course 
of this conversation, went through her performance. 
Thus when the action of a baby just beginning to use 
its legs was mentioned, Mickey crouched on her chest 
and pushed herself along by her hind legs. At the 
mention of a rainstorm, asked what she would do, as 
she had no umbrella, she walked under her master's 
coat. Most striking was the conversation about pho- 
tography. Mr. Braham suggested that it would be 
well to have a photograph taken, and placed a mirror 
upon the floor to guide him as to the best pose. He 
sat in his chair in front of the glass, and then told 
Mickey, who was some little distance away, that he 
wanted her in the picture. She walked across and sat 
some little Jistance away. Mr. Braham said, "No, 
really, you will be out of focus there; come and sit on 
on my right side;" this she also did immediately; still 
this was not satisfactory, and it was suggested to 
Mickey that she should go under the chair. The 
bitch sat with her forelegs straight before her, and 
Mr. Braham told her to cross them, which she did. 
She was then told to put the underneath leg on top, 
etc. All this was done with no apparent effort or fear 
of result. 

In giving an illustration of how she would move if 
lame, she walked with her foreleg out straight, which 
is natural The entertainment concluded by Mr. 
Braham holding a handkerchief before Mickey who 
was seated upon a chair, and on raising it, she had 
disappeared. She had jumped off the chair on to a 
ledge strapped to her master's back. 

At our subsequent interview with Mr. Braham, who 
is an American, and evidently a lover of animals, and 
possesses the power of influencing them, he stated 
that he used no instruments of torture when training 
his dogs, and that his achievements are arrived at by 
patience, perseverance and sympathy alone. He must 
like a dog for itself or he will acquire no influence 
over it, and prefers to have it when two months old. 
Mickey is just three years of age, and the present was 
her first performance in public. It has therefore 
taken nearly three years to train her. 

When training he finds that the greatest strictness 
is required, but that any ill treatment is fatal to the 
chance of ultimate success — at any rate, with Well-bred 
dogs. His experience is, unlike that of some others 
that well-bred degs are much better than mongrels — 
the former being better for training properly and 
humanely and the latter better for a beating! He 
contends that a well-bred dog as a rule bitterly resents 
ill treatment, it feels it for a considerable time, and it 
is doubtful if it ever forgets it; but a mongrel will 
taee a lot of bullying. He further stated that it can 
always be detected when the whip has formed a con- 
siderable part of the training, and instanced "walking 
lame." Many dogs in performing this trick carry 
their legs with the paws curled, a sign that the said 
paws have had many a hard rap with the stick. 

He gave several instances within his own know- 
ledge where cruelty was indulged in d uring training. 
He finds that in the course of training that as the 
dog improves the sagacious expression increases. 
Training, however, makes dogs extremely jealous, 



[February 4, 1905 



and he can never allow another dog into the room 
while his pupil is engaged at his lessons. As far as 
breed goes, he does not consider one breed more 
sagacious than another, and is certain by proper 
training one selected specimen would be as good as 
another. He has been told that a Bull-dog makes a 
difficult pupil and is anxious to get one given him 
upon which he may try his hand Before leaving 
Mr. Braham, we went into his dressing room and was 
introduced to Mickey herself. Mr. Braham asked 
whether we did not think the performance a stereo- 
typed one which she went through daily from end to 
end. We acknowledged that was our impression, and 
we were asked to talk so the dog ourselves. On enter- 
ing the room, Mickey was sitting upon a chair. We 
said: "Will you be good enough to close the door," 
and she at once did so. 

We were also given a small performance, not on the 
bill. A number of colored cups were placed upon the 
floor and we were allowed to select the colors the 
bitch was to bring. She made no mistake, and what 
is more extraordinary, when asked to bring the same 
colored cup she had just picked up, she simply sat 
down and gazed up into the face of her owner. This 
performance seemed to us a proof that she did really 
discern the colors. 

[Concluded Next Week] 



Concerning Scotties. 

The predominant feature in a Scottish Terrier 
should be power and proportion; he should show 
great muscle and strength in every part, without 
number, and this strength should be in proportion. 
The short, compact body, with broad, deep chest and 
muscular loin, must be balanced by a powerful head 
and jaw. The standard is emphatic on the subject. 
Muzzle, very powerful; nose, a good size; neck, thick 
and muscular, 9t-ongly set; chest, broad, proportion- 
ately deep; body, exceedingly strong in hindquarters; 
legs, very heavy in bone; thighs, very muscular; feet, 
strong, general appearance, compact, possessed of 
great muscle in hindquarters; and, lastly, that excel- 
lent conclusion: "In fact, a Scottish Terrier, though 
essentially a Terrier, cannot be too powerfully put 
together." So many breeds have gone astray 
through exaggerating desired qualities that the par- 
enthetic clause in this conclusion is of great import- 
ance. "Essentially a Terrier." must be held to 
signify alertness and activity and that there is a 
limit to the breadth of chest or the strength of head. 
If a dog is to retain its proportion excessive breadth 
of chest would necessitate undue heaviness in hind- 
quarters with the resulting clodiness; while, if we get 
the skull too thick, it is out of proportion with an 
active, compact body. On the other hand, we must 
equally avoid a too fine head, as it will appear weak 
in comparison with the muscular body, and to retain 
correct proportion would require a narrow chest and 
weak hindquarters, with the consequent loss of the 
characteristic of power. It is not an uncommon 
event in most breeds that a judge should conlese to 
never look behind a moderate head, or even to admit 
that he makes his awards mainly on the merits of the 
head. This method is most absurd in a breed like 
Scots, where great strength in small compass is de- 
sired, as, unless the head is in proportion to the body, 
it may be described as a bad head, whatever its 
merits may be were it decapitated, for without pro- 
portion we are likely to get abnormality. We do not 
want a pocket Hercules, but an active muscular dog, 
quick, keen and strong, and a sense of proportion 
saves us from either strength without beauty or 
beauty without strength. 

That the framers of the standard were of this 
opinion is shown, by the scale of points, for the skull 
receives 5 points and muzzle 5 — one-tenth of the whole 
between them — and if we add 5 for eyes and 10 for 
ears, one-quarter of the whole is made up. The Eng- 
lish standard deducts 5 points from ears, and divides 
them between muzzle and skull, but both agree in 
considering the head, including eyes and ears, should 
only be valued as one quarler of the total points. 
Size and coat are considered of as much value yet few 
judges place the same importance upon size as they 
do upon skull and muzzle combined, which is the 
Scottish standard's appreciation of their respective 
merits. Body receives 15 points, neck 5, chest 5 and 
legs and feet 10, in all 35 points, or as 7 is to 5 in com- 
parison with head properties. The remaining 40 points 
include 15 for coat, 10 for size, 10 for general appearance 
and 5 between tail and color; and, classing these to- 
gether, we get the relative values as 8 to these, " to 
body and 5 to head. Judging by points has never 
been popular, as it is impractical, but this is no reason 
for neglect of the standard and scale of points and the 
value of the latter in showing the comparative im- 
portance of the various parts should not be overlooked. 
According to the Scotch scale, the following are con- 
sidered of equal importance, each being valued at 10 
points, or one-tenth of the whole — skull and muzzle, 
ears, neck and chest, legs and feet, size and general 
appearance. The two individually most important 
points are body and coat, each valued at 15. Though 
eyes only rt ceive 5 points light eyes are usually a very 
severe handicap in the show ring, but, even judged 
by points, it is open to the judge to consider that a 
light eye ruins the general appearance, and so to de- 
duct a further 10 points These points for general 
appearance are a fluctuating quantity, and a judge 
who desired to give different features the values 
attached to them in the standard could make use of 
thpm to emphasize his objection to any particular 
failing. But, as has been said, judging by points is 
obsolete for many excellent reasons, one of which is 
that a dog might exist which would scope heavily 
point by point and yet be a perfeci horror. So that 
if the scale of points were used in judging, it would be 



February 4, 1905J 



9 



necessary to give a larger number to general appear- 
ance, and a good percentage toexpression. The value 
of the scale of points i8 to keep us free from faddiness, 
or getting carried away by one particular feature; the 
dog, for instance, is not a part of the head, and good 
size is a virtue, which should influence position in the 
prize list as much as good ears. 

I may appear to have wandered from power and 
proportion, but power must be more definitely dealt 
with when the standard i9 examined, and all I have 
written regarding the scale of points is circumstantial 
evidence of the necessity of proportion. — Macsiccer in 
English Illustrated Kennel Xeios. 



DOINGS IN DOGDOM. 



BENCH SHOW LORE 

The first bench show in America was held in Mine- 
ola, N. Y , in 1874, in connection with the Queens 
county agricultural fair. It wa9 principally made up 
of shooting dogs. The first Westminster Kennel Club 
show was held in New York 1876 and that association 
has since been recognized as one of the leading factors 
in bench shows. The New England Kennel Club held 
its first show just 21 years ago, and in importance it 
ranks a close second to the New York dog show. 

The first bench show held in this city took place in 
1877. 

PACIFIC BULL TERRIER CLUB. 

Bull Terrier circles are astir and indications are 
bright for a warm showing of the breed here in May. 
The Pacific Bull Terrier Club has been recently re- 
organized and will soon become a very strong specialty 
club if the list of new members and prominent fanciers 
identified with the success of the club is a mark to go 
by. Ed Attridge and W. J. Tiernan are the tempor- 
ary chairman and secretary. A meeting will soon be 
held to complete final re-organization. 



HARES SCARCE FOR LE ASHMEN. 

Coursing throughout this State has been brought 
almost to a standstill through lack of hares and the 
situation should be an object lesson to the men who 
think game birds and animals need no protection. It 
is found that the hares which overran the San Joa- 
quin valley some years ago and were a menace to the 
farmers have been almost exterminated. 

Twenty years ago the fields were so thickly covered 
with hares that when the latter were disturbed the 
whole face of the earth seemed on the move. The 
hares did not mind passing vehicles and drivers used 
to flip them with their whips as they drove past. 
This is all changed now. The spectators at the recent 
Bakersfield field trials covered a large area of ground 
each day and saw comparatively few hares. 

There has been a systematic campaign against the 
little pests for years in addition to the building up of 
the country. They also command a good price in the 
market for food and havethus driwn the professional 
hunters upon them. These conditions and the con- 
stant draft on the visible supply for the coursing 
parks have about cleaned out the 'jacks" from a dis- 
trict that was literally overrun with them. 

The men who have the appliances for catching 
hares for the coursing parks have gone to Oregon in 
quest of hares. The expressage on each hare shipped 
from the north will be 48 cents, which, with the ex- 
penses of the men sent after them, will make them an 
expensive luxury. 

A report from the north states that the famine in 
hares, which threatened for a time to put a stop to 
coursing on this coast, is over, and from present ap- 
pearances the question of supply will not come up 
again for some time. 

There has not been such a determined campaign of 
extermination waged against the little pests in Oregon 
and in Idaho, from which places they will be secured 
in the future. The expense will be doubled owing to 
the extra cost of securing them and the increased 
transportation on the longer haul. 

The hares from Oregon will be caught at Echo, 
about 130 miles from Portland. 



IRISH WATER SPANIEL KENNELS. 

We are pleased to note the enterprise of Mr. Win. 
Bay of this city in establishing a kennel of Irish 
Water Spaniels. Several years ago the breed was 
represented here by as good specimens as, at that 
time, could probably be found in the United States, 
among them were Ch. Dennis O, and a grand dog he 
was in his prime, peerless on the bench and a good 
worker to the gun; Ch. Dan Maloney, Belle Marsh 
and others in the Williams' kennels and numerous 
good ones bred from the trio mentioned To quite an 
extent the breed here has been too closely inbred, in 
fact this might be said to quite a degree, of the breed 
throughout the United States, the same crosses show- 
ing up repeatedly. 

Mr. Bay is the owner of Mike B. (first novice S. F. 
1904) who is by Ch. Dennis C. ex Belle Marsh and an 
all round good one. He received this week Irom 
Burrard Kennels, Vancouver, B. C, that sterling 
good bitch Rowdy Girl (Assiniboine Tim-Assiniboine 
Bodega). Girl ha9 been a consistent winner at the 
northwest shows and as we saw her this week is a very 
classy bitch, albeit a little out of coat. Being in whelp 
to Ch. Our Chance offers the possibility of a good out- 
cross. Chance was bought by Mr. Rolston when visit- 
ing the "old country." He was the winner of many 
firsts both in England and Ireland and was looked 
upon by Mr. Roteton as a particularly fitted dog for 
an outcrossin breeding his bitches. 

Irish Water Spaniels are dogs that are in favor of 
sportsmen of the whole Coast and it is rather surpris- 
ing that the breed has been temporarily, at least, 
overlooked by local fanciers. Dennis C, is still in use 
.here as a stud dog an while the breed has a strong 
following here we believe there should be every en- 
couragement given for a revival of this particular 
fancy and trust that the Bench Show Committee of 
the San Francisco Kennel Club will do the handsome 
thing for the "rat tailed span'els," at the coming 
show. 



ENGLISH BETTERS IN TRIALS, 

A private field trial will soon take place, near 
Bodega cross roads, Marin county, to determine the 
respective merits of Attorney McWade's, of Oakland, 
English Setter Tonopah, a son of Clipper W., and Jas. 
Dunham's Plumas (Cavalier-Lovcknot). The race 
will be judged by the veteran sportsman William 
Dormer and bids fair to be an interesting running. 



BREED TO A GOOD SIRE. 

Glen Tana Bounder (.only litter brother to Ch. 
Anfield Model, the greatest living sire of the day) is 
regarded as one of the best stud dog9 on the Coast. 
This dog is worthy the attention of owners of good 
bitches. 

Mr. Griffiths writes us about a piece of bad luck in 
the recent loss of his good brood bitch imp. Glen 
Tana Laura Lea (winner of five firsts and dam of 
the Philadelphia winner Glen Tana Talent and 
Balmoral Duchess). She was in whelp to Rippowam's 
Archer. 

Glen Tana Collie Kennels have at present for sale 
fifteen grandly bred brood bitches in whelp. 



CH. CATO JR. STOLEN. 

J. M. Golobeck of Crockett had the misfortune to 
lose his well-known prize winning English Setter 
Ch. Cato Jr. last weed. The dog disappeared one 
day and despite a vigorous search all trace of him has 
been lost. It is supposed he was stolen and shipped 
out cf this State, a fate that has heretofore befallen 
more than olo good dog. 

The disappea rance of Constable Moiles'Collie puppy 
from Crockett and subsequent recovery from the 
sailors who stole the pup, gave rise to a suspicion that 
Cato had been secreted on one of several wheat ships 
that were berthed at the Eckley warehouses. This 
suspicion was so strong that a search of one vessel, 
the Max, was made last Sunday morning whilst the 
ship was lying in the bay awaiting a tug to take her 
outside "the heads." The search of the ship was 
futile, and the Setter is still missing. 



GOLDEN WEST COLLIE CLUB. 

Collies will undoubtedly be one of the feature breeds 
at the eighth S. F. K. C. show. The newly formed 
specialty club members are taking active interest in 
the coming exhibition, and propose to make a record 
Coast entry of Collies The membership list of the 
Club is steadily increasing, and contains the names of 
the leading Collie fanciers of the Coast. 



YOUNG DOGS WANTED. 

Several communications have been received by the 
Kennel Editor in which the different writers state 
that they desire to purchase — two Newfoundland 
puppies; a Gordon Setter, puppy or dog one year old ; 
an Airedaile Terrier, young dog; and an Irish Water 
Spaniel dog puppy or young dog. 

Particulars desired, by anyone having one or more 
of the dogs listed above, may be obtained from the 
Kennel Editor. 

JUDGES FOR THE BOSTON SHOW. 

Miss Anna H. Whitney, Lancaster, Mass., — Blood- 
hounds, St. Bernards, Mastiffs and Deerhounds. 

James Mortimer, Hempstead, N. Y. — Great Danes, 
Russian Woolfhounds, Poodles, Dachshunds, Bull 
Terriers, Smooth Fox Terriers, French Bulldogs, 
Miscellaneous 

Harry W. Lacy, Wakefield, Mass. — Retrievers, 
Manchester Terriers, Maltese Terriers, Toy (except 
Boston) Terriers, Pomeranians, Engli»h Toy Spani-ls, 
Old English Sheep Dogs, Dalmatians, Toy Black and 
Tan Terriers, Japanpse Spaniels. 

J. M. Jowett, Spipley, England — Greyhounds, Eng- 
lish Foxhounds, Airedale Terriers, Irish, Scottish, 
Welsh, Wire-haired Fox Terriers, Yorkshire Terriers, 
Whippets. 

Marsh Byers, Grand Rapids', Mich. — Setters and 
Pointers. 

John Black, Harrisburg, Pa. — Collies. 
Joseph M. Dale, Brooklyn, N. Y. — Boston Terriers. 
Frank F. Dole, New Haven, Conn. — Sporting 
Spaniels. 

R. D. Perry, Ashburnham, Mass. — American Fox- 
hounds. 

Tyler Morse, Boston, Mass.— English Bulldogs. 
C. W. Barney, New Bedford, Mass — Beagles. 



A son of Edgecote Peer, now five months old, is 
said to be one of the best looking Bull Terriers ever 
bred here. 

Mr. Spencer, a well known local Collie fancier, 
brought with him on hia recent return from "across 
the water" a son of Balgreggie Hope. 



Referring to Collies reminds us that Hugh Mc- 
Craken has a handsome youngster by Ch. Hanover 
Monarch out of Presidio Lassie. This youngBter, his 
owner believes, will rip off a few ribbons at the com- 
ing show. 

INFLAMMATION OF THE CLAWS. 

It is frequently asked as to the best way to deal 
with a troubl i which is a very common one amongst 
some breeds of dogs. Fox Terriers In particular 
suffer from it, especially if they are kopt indoors, and 
that is inflammation of the claws, set up either by 
overgrown nails or perhaps by the dog's foot being 
trampled upon. There are swellings and inflammation 
between the toeB, which, if neglected, become chronic, 
and the dog is perpetually suffering from something 
of the kind. First of all it may be remarked that 
dogs which are kept out of doors and have plenty of 
liberty require very little attention to their claws. 

Rnnning about on hard roads prevents the claws 
from growing too long, whereas in the case of pet 
dogs kept indoors, running about on carpets, etc., 
all day, the disposition is for the claws to grow very 
long and to curve over, and very soon they will begin 



to grow inwards into the flesh. To prevent this, of 
course, they must be cut from time to time, and should 
any one have become overgrown and curved round in 
the manner described, this cutting will have to be 
done by slow degrees. For soreness and inflammation 
between the claws there is nothing much better than 
the liquid extract of witch hazel, which can be used 
diluted with four or five times Its own bulk of water, 
and is very soothing, as well as antiseptic. — Field and 
Fancy. 



The Late Horace H. Briggs. 

The sad sequel to the reported disappearance of 
Horace H. Briggs, noted in last week's issue, was an- 
nounced in this city by a telephone message last 
Wednesday stating that the remains of poor Briggs 
had been found in the San Joaquin river near Sher- 
man island by two fishermen. 

Briggs had been missing since January 3d, and until 
recently the hope was indulged in that he had gone 
on a hunting and fishing trip. But now the worst 
fears of his friends are confirmed. When last seen 
alive he was in a skiff on the river. Later the skiff 
was found empty on the shore of the mainland, and 
at one time suspicions of foul play were entertained. 

The deceased wa9 50 years of age and a native of 
San FVancisco. He leaves a mother, Mrs. Ellen G. 
Briggs, and three brothers — A. G. Briggs of Merced, 
A. H. Briggs and H. F. Briggs, who live at 2954 Van 
Ness avenue, this city. At one time he was field editor 
of the Breeder and Sportsman and president of 
the Olympic Club. 

Horace Briggs was not only a brilliant writer on 
topics of interest to sportsmen, but had as well a 
gifted, pen for general topics. He was a man of strong 
personal character, congenial in disposition and had 
a host of staunch friends. His untimely fate is re- 
gretted sincerely by all who knew him. 



AT THE TRAPS. 



The Ingleside grounds were open last Sunday and 
a number of shooters were present. R. C. Reed ran 
up some clever scores. 

The initial shoot for this season will probably take 
place on Washington's Birthday under the auspices 
of the Union and Golden Gate Gun Clubs. 



The biggest bluerook tournament ever pulled off In 
in the south is now being planned by the executive 
committee of the Los Angeles Gun Club. 

Greater added money will be hung up than ever be- 
fore, there being now $200 in the treasury with which 
to start. Using this as a nucleus, it is thought likely 
that at least $300 additional can be raised in the* vari- 
ous ways open to the club, and a flat offer of $500 
added money is to be made as inducement to distant 
shooters. 

The tournament will be another three days' affair 
similar to that of last May, and will occur on practi- 
cally the same dates — Friday, Saturday and Sunday, 
May 5, 6 and 7. In addition to the cash inducements, 
the usual trophies will be shot for, and the merchan- 
dise traditions of the game preserved with a big 
twenty-five bird wind-up in which gunners will be 
able to win all manner of goods for which they have 
not the slightest use on earth. 

Within afewweeks announcements will be mailed 
to all the leading trigger knights now on the Pacific 
Coast, and it Is thought extremely likely that the big 
shoo.t that is to come will prove a banner event not 
only in numbers of contestants, but also in class. 

The Pacific Coast bluerock program for this spring 
is an extensive one embracing a number of tourna- 
ments in the big cities, mostly occurring within six 
weeks. An organized effort is being made by San 
Francisco sportsmen to get the Grand American 
Handicap decided in this city and should this come to 
pass California will be visited by the best bluerock 
breakers in the business. In tbis case Los Angeles 
may rest assurfd of its share of "saucer sharks" at 
the three days' trap carnival. 

The Los Angeles shoot will be an open one aud 
handicaps will bo dispensed with altogeteer. No 
amateurs are to be barred and the better they come, 
the better local gunners wili be pleased. The money 
is to be put up to be shot for, and it makes very little 
difference who gets it. 



GOSSIP FOR SPORTSMEN. 



BIRDS WERE PLENTIFUL. 

It is the concensus of opinion on the part of a num- 
ber of gentlemen who were in attendance at there- 
cent Bakersfield trials that more birds were found 
during the running of the Derby stake than wero pos- 
bly found for the dogs to work oh in all of last sea- 
son's trials In the United States put together. It will 
be remembered that there was almost a genenal lack 
of birdsin theEast; in fact, onetrials was run through 
without finding a bird in any stake. 

The quail, however, were not so remarkably numer- 
ous that people had to be careful to avoid stepping on 
them. They had been protected from molestation 
for months prior to the trials, the breeding season 
had been a good one, eover was never in better shape, 
and favorablo weather conditions, all together, made 
a plentiful supply of quail. 

As a rule in casting off tho dogs, judge and handlers 
knew where birds were; dogs were put down and 
then ranged far and wido until they reached the 
birds. In this mannor ideal work was performed. 

A noticeable incident of the All-Age occurred— the 
wholo cavalcade, horsemen, vehicles and pedestrians 
wero bunched on a knoll watching a brace ranging 
somedistanco away. Everybody was quiet and un- 
demonstrative, for the dogs were doing spirited work. 
Of a sudden a handsome cock quail walked out from 
a bunch of cover almost under a buggy's wheels. 
The bird was not apparently frightened but walked 



10 



[February 4, 1905 



leisurely out 25 feet from the circle of intensely in- 
terested sportsmen and came to a halt, standing 
proudly erect and beautifully defiant. The audience 
with one accord, seemed suddenly merged into rigid 
statues, so careful was each individual not to disturb 
the bird. The brace of dogs meanwhile were working 
up to the knoll, suddenly one dog snapped into a 
staunch point, backed by the other, on the game little 
cock— the incident taking place within 25 feet of the 
spectators. We will venture to say that this occur- 
rence is unparalleled in the history of field trials. It 
need not be supposed that the quail on these grounds 
were tame and stall fed, they were all found lively and 
game to the core. 

GOOD BHOOTING AT Tl LAKE LAKE. 

That question of supreme moment to many sports- 
men - "where are the sprigs?"— has at last been 
answered. The white-breasted beauties are at Tulare 

^Gunners who have sat in blinds morning after morn- 
ing waiting for old-time ilights that never came; who 
have strained their eyes watching the horizon until 
patience ceased to be a virtue may be glad to learn 
that notwithstanding the lawless depredations of the 
market hunters, there are still countless thousands of 
big ducks on the Tulare, and splendid sport there for 
all. 

Guy Lovelace, a prominent Los Angeles sportsman 
and crack trap shooter, who recently returned from a 
week's trip to his ranch near Hanford, put in five 
days on the lake shooting ducks and killed the limit 
every time he started, picking the birds. Fine, fat, 
grain-fed sprigs and plump teal, were his choice and 
the killing was shipped each night to friends in this 
city says the Los Angeles Times. 

There are now around Tulare a number of outfits 
hunting for the San Francisco market. Thevmay 
be divided roughly into two classes: the "wing shots" 
and the "bull hunters." These last are about the 
lowest of human creation permitted to shoulder a gun. 
They stalk sitting Hocks by using a steer as a moving 
blind and stepping in unison with him on his "off 
side" so as not to alarm the unsuspecting fowl. 
Armed with four-bore muzzle loaders these fellows 
dump half a pound of shot into a flock at one rise and 
often pick up more than the limit to both barrels. 
But limits do not go in Tulare. One pair of duck 
murderers, hunting behind the same steer, boasted 
proudly of having picked up 204 sprigs as the result 
of four shots, but the story is a bit too strong for even 
that land of unrestrained, unmitigated duck butchery. 

Big ducks are always plenty around the lake, but 
this year they are exceptionally well represented. 
This is partly because the Buena Vista marsh south- 
west of Bakersfield is dry; doubtless in some measure 
it is due to the poor food conditions south of the Te- 
hachepi, which cause the birds to return to the land 
of plemty after starving a week or so on the depleted 
fields in this end of the State. There is no attraction 
to keep ducks here, and they cannot be blamed for 
betaking themselves to a place that offers all the 
'comforts of home" to wildfowl as Tulare now does. 
The drowned wheat fields and plenty of freshwater 
create a heaven for webfeet. 

The best way of making the trip is to take the train 
to Lemoore or Hanford, and engage a team for the 
long twenty-mile drive to Tulare lake. If one knows 
the market hunters accommodations can usually be 
arranged for, and the "wing shots" will be found 
good fellows, willing to treat a visitor "right, " and 
show him the modus operandi of the game, which 
differs somewhat from duck shooting in other parts 
of the State. The engaging of one of these keen-eyed 
chaps for guide might prove a paying venture. 

Three days is the shortest practicable time, and a 
week is better for the journey. 

The big wing shots are a different class. One of 
them is J. H. Carlisle the veteran who always attends 
Los Angelestrap tournaments. Mr. Carlisle puts in 
his winters shooting for the market and pays expenses 
by selling his birds. He hunts like a sportsman, and 
has his own camD established on dry ground near the 
lake. Lovelace staid with him while shooting there. 

The wing shots around Tulare have blinds sunken 
in the shallow water at ad vantageous places — "cans" 
they call them. The flight is a noon affair, caused by 
the much despised "bull hunters" who begin their 
nefarious operations about ten o'clock, starting the 
feeding sprigs off the drowned wheat fields where 
they resort to gorge to their neck's capacity. 

From 11 o'clock until 2, the sport is as fast as any 
man can desire, and a good shot could easily kill a 
half hundred birds an hour. Sprigs, teal and spoon- 
bills are the prevailing bird; the festive spoonie has a 
picnic at Tulare, and is generally passed up except by 
those who prowl along the ditches jumping ducks. 
The wing sho'^s use big stands of decoys. 

Sentiment against the "bull hunters" has run high 
at times The wing shooters charge the ground sluic- 
ing element with crippling hundreds of birds, and say 
that the lake is now literally dotted with wounded 
sprigs feebly crawling about through the weeds hunt- 
ing a place to lay down their poor miserable little 
lives. The "bull hunters" are too busy hunting pot 
shots to pick up their cripples clean; that takes more 
time than bombarding another flock. The "arm of 
the law" doesn't seem to be long enough to stop the 
indiscriminate violation of the limit, aud the statute 
might as well not be on the books so far as observance 
of it around Tulare is concerned. 



NETTING DUCKS. 

As a sample of past legislation and what may turn up 
against the effectiveness of many proposed changes 
as well as new clauses added to the game laws we call at- 
tention of sportsmen to the clause in which the taking 
of wild ducks with nets is made a misdemeanor. This 
part of the law was aimed particularly at the net 
fishermen who follow the vocation of taking fish, for 
the markets, in San Francisco, San Pablo and Suisun 
bays as well as the Sacramento and San Joaquin 
rivers— in fact all tributary waters to San Francisco 
bay. 

This measure in its present form is absolutely use- 



less. The nets used are the same as the ones for taking 
fish. In legitimate net fishing wild fowl are frequently 
enmeshed, in such a case the fisherman has the repu- 
tation of keeping the drowned birds for what he can 
make by their sale. What is the manner of determin- 
ing whether a fisherman is out for ducks or fish? How 
can the arresting officers determine whether birds 
have been illegally taken, unless they apprehend the 
law violators in the act of seining wild ducks? A 
fishing boat may come in with less than 50 birds, the 
legal limit is 50 ducks, in such case the men are im- 
mune from interference. That many ducks are caught 
by the net fishermen seems to be pretty well established 
If there was any change in the laws needed, it would 
seem as if this particular clause could stand some 
effecient renovaiion. 

WATCH THE GAME IMPORTER. 

Well meaning persons sometimes inflict great 
damage on communities by the importation of game 
and fish. Much money has been spent in some sec- 
tions in an endeavor to rid the country of the English 
sparrow imported to this country by a kind-hearted 
philanthropist some years ago. The planting of 
German carp in the waters of the United States was a 
move made with the best of intentions no doubt, but 
with disastrous results. It was a kind-hearted in- 
dividual who imported rabbits into Australia, and the 
natives have been spending fabulous sums to rid the 
country of what has proved to be the worst of pests. 
British officers in Jamaica imported the mongoose to 
exterminate snakes. He did, also pretty much every- 
thing else. Now the islanders want something to ex- 
terminate the exterminator. The moral is easily 




Claude H. Smith 
Secretary of the Ithaca Gun Company 



noticeable. Great caution should be exercised in the 
importation of foreign birds, fish or animals into a 
country already at its wits ends to preserve its game 
and game fish. 

STEELHEAD ANGLING OVER. 

On Thursday, close season for steelhead trout began 
and will be in order until the opening of the trout sea- 
son April 1st. 

The last Sunday of the season at Point Reyes (Jan- 
uary 29th) was enjoyed by about three score of anglers. 

A number of fish were caught, most of the large 
ones, however, were spent fish 

According to the Santa Rosa Press Democrat last 
week, prospects for steelhead angling next season are 
evidently first class as fish will be plentiful: 

"It was learned yesterday, Jan. 2Uh, that never be- 
fore in the recollection of the oldest inhabitant around 
Cloverdale have the streams tributary to the Russian 
River contained as many steelheads as at the preset t 
time. The anglers are reported to have had excellent 
sport and have landed some fine large fish." 



NEW SOUTHERN GUN CLUB. 

Los Angeles sportsmen seem to be happily off for 
good shooting preserves. With a number of well 
established clubs now enjoying the shooting in that 
district there will be next winter a new club on the 
Ballona— the Del Rey. C. A. Winship, W. H. Stim- 
son, Henry W. Keller, William Banning, J. W. A. Off, 
and five others are the members. The institution is 
named after Playa Del Rey, and Mr. Winship, who is 
superintending the preliminary arrangements, ex- 
pects to put some novel features into operation when 
the ponds are built. The club has already developed 
150 inches of pure water, acd seems independent in 
in this regard. 

A long sprig pond, whose dimensions will be a mile 
or a mile atid a quarter long by several hundred yards 
wide, is one of Mr. Winship's original ideas. Its 
unique feature is to be an island thrown up in the 
middle upon which will be all the blinds. This patch 
will contain about an acre and is to be sewed with 
Egyptian and Kaffir corn for the ducks, thus dis- 
pensing with the need of artificial feeding. 

There is also considerable water on the Del Rey 
grounds, and the birds bitch in there by thethou6and. 
Members of the club feel very much encouraged at 
the prospect, and think they will have splendid sport 
next winter. The preserving of this bit of marsh 
completes the chain, and now the birds will be let 
alone five days each week throughout a space of terri- 
tory triangular in shape and containing roughly some 
eight square miles. This may reasonably be expected 
to afford a considerable refuge for the wild fowl, and 
is likely to make the Ballona good ducking ground as 
long as any. 

Foxhunting as a sport setius to be growing in 
many sections of this country and has a strong follow- 
ing of enthusiastic sportsmen and sportswomen. Fox 
hunters have been, by an observing devotee of the 
chase, divided into the following classes: 

"There are four kinds of fox hunters. The object 
of the first is to destroy the fox A farmer's boy with 
a shotgun lies in ambush on a runway and pots him as 
he trots by. This from the English point of view, is 
a little worse than murder and as bad as poaching. 
The man who shoots foxes enjoy an ignominy, at least 
in the minds of other hunters, which is unique. 

"Fox hunters of the second class find their sport in 
watching or listening to native hounds trail a fox. 
They go afield on foot, and post themselves on high 
groutd commanding the runway. In Kentucky and 
in parts of New EDgland that is a deservedly popult r 
sport offering, as it does, an opportunity for testing 
the remarkable nose of the American bound. 

"In fox hunting of the third kind, the object is to 
purf ue a fox with hounds and to follow the hounds 
across country with horses. To meet fox hunters of 
this category, the following is the most important 
part: It requires horsemanship, a good horse and 
lasting enthusiasm to ride well and hard to hounds. 

"The fox hunters of the fourth class, to make an 
Irish statement, do not hunt a fox at all, but a drag ; 
nevertheless, they ride to hounds, and this allies them 
to those who ride to hounds after a wild fox." 



GEESE SHOOTING WITH A RIFLE. 

The old custom among South Carolina market 
hunters was to use a monster "duck gun," carrying a 
charge of shot which would practically slaughter an 
entire flock at one shot. This threatened to extermi- 
nate the finest game from those waters, and the state 
took a hand in the matter and stopped the threatened 
war of extinction. The "duck gun" has been super- 
seded by the rifle. The Confederate sharpshooter, 
who is 9aid to have been able to hit a button on an 
enemy's coat as far as he could see it, is not in it with 
the Carolina wild goose shot. A majority of the 
geese and swans coming from thatsection have asingle 
shot through the head. The sound gunners are re- 
ported as being able to make fifty strikes of a goose's 
head with a rifle at 200 yards. That means that he 
brings down his game from asinkbox or boat, which 
is tossed by the waves, while his target, the head of a 
goose not two inches square, is itself moving up and 
down on the water. This method avoids the mutila- 
tion of tho game, and adds to its sightly appearance. 



Annual Election ot Officers. 



The annual meeting of the stockholders of the 
Savage Arms Company, Ulica, N. Y., was held on 
January 25tb, and the following officers were elected. 
President, Berj. Adriance; Vice-President, Walter 
JeromevGreen; Secretary and Treasurer, J. DePeyster 
Lynch. 

Mr. Arthur W. Savage is no longer connected with 
the company in the capacity of Managing Director 
and is therefore not authorized to make any trans- 
actions for the company. 

An Eastern Sportsman Here. 

Mr. Claude H. Smith, Secretary of the Ithaca Gun 
Co. is an enthusiastic admirer of California and Call- 
fornians, and he is now in San Francisco, whence he 
expects soon to make a shooting expedition with Mr. 
Phil B. Bekeart, the Pacific Coast representative of 
the celebrated Ithaca Gun. 

Mr. Smith is an enthusiastic sportsman and is 
especially fond of yachting. He is the owner of the 
25 footer "Orphan" formerly of Boston, now, for sev- 
eral seasons, the champion of the New York Lakes 
Mr. Smith always sails his own boat, and is consider-, 
ed the best skipper in Central New York. 

After a short stay in California, he is expecting to 
sail for Honolulu in company with Mr. Frank Jermyn, 
the millionaire horseman of Scranton, Pa. 



A Runaway Race. 

In "hoss racin" when one horse beats the field so 
badly as to make explanations and excuses impossible, 
those versed in the vernacular of the turf call it 
"a runaway race. " Sporting Life's "Trap Shooting 
Review for 1904" shows that the shooters who shot 
Winchester "Leader" and Winchester "Repeater" 
shotgun shells made "a runaway race" of the contest 
for premier honors for the year. Out of the 29 
shooters who made 90?o, or over, shooting at least 
3000 targets in competition during the year, 17 shot 
Winchester "Leader" and "Repeater" shells. These 
17 include Messrs. Gilbert and Crosby, who lied for 
first professional average; Mr. John W.Garrett, who 
won first amateur average; C. B. Wiggins and C. M. 
Powers, who tied for second amateur average, and 
nine of the first thirteen leaders. Another coveted 
honor won by Winchester shotgun shells was the 
Grand Prize at the St. Louis Exposition, Winchester 
shells being the only ones to receive such an award. 
These triumphs on the firing line and in the strife of 
international competition prove that Winchester shot- 
gun shells are in a class all by themselves, and that 
class is the first. Those that desire to be in the first 
class should shoot first class shells, the kind that won 
all the honors in 1904, as they did in 1900, 1901, 1902 
and 1903. 



February 4, 19C5] 



11 



THE FARM. 



Farm Notes. 



A writer says : The advent of the Tarn- 
worth swine lhto the United States makes 
a new departure, if not a new era in the 
Bwine industry of this country, for the 
Tamworth is pre-eminently a bacon hog 
as against the lard-producing qualities of 
his immediate predeces'ors. Though a 
comparatively new breed on this side oi 
the Atlantic, theTamworth has long beet 
reared in England and more recently ii 
Canada and the Northwest. He is now 
coming South 

Quick growing stock are the most 
profitable because they are ready for the 
market sooner, and thus the money is 
turned more frequently. 

Few understand what a balanced ration 
is. But stock must be fed in g >od pr< - 
portion to get the be6t results. 

If a colt gets stunted during the first 
winter he will hardly recover from it it) 
the sprin The only safe plan is to keep 
him under the best conditions possible 

Hogs are not indecently filthy if they 
have a good chance to be otherwise. 

If a horse is nervous and fiery, he should 
be calmed by frequent slow driving 
Fiery horses ate never safe. It is possible 
that they should never be used as draft 
horses ; their idea of doing things is fasltr 
than in a walk. Much trouble is caused 
by using horses in places to which tl.ey 
are not adapted. Thus some horses are 
spoiled, others woik but fret all the 
time. 

Healthy conditions are such that ani- 
mals will not need much medicine. 

Sows that are kept too fat will prob- 
ably bring lew pigs, and they will not be 
very healthy 

Haste in breeding may gain a few 
months in the coming of the foal, but the 
profit will be greater if animals are not 
bred too early. 

Pastures are one of the best and most 
economical feeds for Btock. In fact, much 
of the profit is taken away by not having 
some grazing place. 

Nothing makes a better pasture for hogs 
than alfalfa . 

Pigs make their most rapid growth 
when fed upon grain while running in 
pastures. 

When stock of any kind has scours it is 
an indication that they are getting som' 
kind of food that does not agree witl 
them. Some change should be made, and 
plenty of soft charcoal or aBhes should be 
put within easy reach. 

Few feeds are more nourishing than 
corn fodder, if it is cut green and put in 
condition for stock to eat. Bright, greer 
fodder, if shredded or cut fine, makes fim 
food The stock enjoy the stalks as 
much, or more, than the leaves, as the 
stalks are sweeter. 

The lambs that come earliest are the 
most profitable, as well as being the most 



trouble. They need warm quarters, and 
must be forced to grow. At first, warmth 
is of more importance than feed. Unless 
they have the warmth they will be 
checked in growth and will not be in 
good ( ondition when the time to market 
arrives. Afler they get a gocd start they 
will be no more trouble, if the mother 
gives plenty of milk. 

Oats are an ideal grain food for the 
horse. The kernel proper contains a 
large amount of the nutriment. The 
hulls surrounding the grain give the 
material bulk that tends to prevent over- 
feeding and at the same time makes the 
food light and easy of digestion by the 
duids of the stomacli. Where horses are 
lard worked one should leave the oat 
ation with a great deal of caution and 
•'arn by experience what can le accom- 
plished otherwise. 

As a partial substitute for oats, bran 
and gluten feed may be used. Bran is 
light and partially inert and takes the 
place of a small portion of hay. It fur- 
nishes the hors3 probably three-fifths cr 
three-fourths as much nuttiment as the 
same weight of oats, dluten feed is con- 
siderably higher in protein and almost, or 
quite, as rich in carbohydrates as oats. 
In changing feed reduce oat ration one- 
third, substituting mixture of bran and 
gluten fted equal to oats by weight. 

While corn can always be fed to horses 
with satisfaction, there is a limit to its 
use, and in ordinary cases the supply 
should not be latge. Allow two pounds 
of corn to a feed as a substitute for two 
poinds of oats. Corn causes horses to 
sweat if fed in very large quantities, and 
is a better winter than summer food. 
Corn is a strong food and is much appre- 
ciated by hard worked horses, because it 
furnishes so much actual energy. A com- 
bination of corn and oats will be found 
mote economical and much better than to 
feed either one exclusively —Pro], W. A. 
Henry, Wisconsin Agricultural College. 



Ground and Cut Foods. 



One may argue that nature intended 
animals to tear their food apart and 
grind it for themselves. This is so, be- 
yond doubt, so far as wild animals are 
J concerned, but long years of domesticity 
have dulled some of the masticating 
powers of the farm animal. This may 
not ba good science, but all who have 
experimented intelligently know that 
mo3t farm animals, with the possible 
exception of the horse, do best when the 
food is ground before feeding and the 
roughage cut into short lengths. 

The writer experimented with corn 
stover along th ; s line last winter, cutting 
the tender part of the stalks into pieces 
six or eight inches long and the heavy 
parts cutting crosswise with a hatchet. 
In feeding, the mass was sometimes mois- 
ened with warm water and then a little 
rjran sprinkled through it. A forkful 
of nice clover hay was then placed in one 
corner of the manger and this mass of 
corn fodder in the other corner, with 
the result that the corn fodder was in- 




variably eaten first. This to see which 
they preferred; then, by careful records, 
it was found that our grain ration could 
be reduced 20 per cent and the same re- 
sults obtained in milk both as to quality 
and quantity. We figured this paid for 
the labor in preparing the cut fodder. 
Try it. 

Age to Feed Cattle. 



It requires ? bout one-half as much grain 
to produce a hundred pounds of gain on 
calves as on two year-olds. The woik of 
the Missouri Agricultural College has 
definitely demonstrated that the most 
profitable age to fatten cattle is while 
they are still young. The older the ani- 
mal the more food is required to produce 
a given gain. Other stations have also 
investigated this question and have ar 
rived at the same result. 

The Central Experiment Station Farm 
at Ottawa, Canada, found by comparing 



Feeding Barley Pulp. 



■■■■■■■ 

Hazel Kinnev 2:09i 



Assemblyman Atkinson of San Francis- 
co has introduced in the legislature, un- 
der the "pure food" classification, a bill 
which is designed to atop the feeding of 
barley pulp to milch cows. 

The bill proposes to amend section 382 
of the penal code, relating to the adulter- 
ation clause: "Every person who feeds 
his cow, or cows with refuse grain from a 
brewery or any malt house, after the 
same had been used in the manufacture 
of beer, ale or malt, and offers for sale for 
human consumption, and milk, butter or 
cheese, which is a product from such cow 
or cows, is guilty of a misdemeanor." 

It is a well known fact that many of 
the dairymen of San Francisco purchase 
the tarley pulp thrown out by the San 
Francisco breweries and use it as fodder 
for their cattle. The arrangement is 
satisfactory to both them and the brew- 
ers, and the trade in this class of food 




Dollexa 2:21} by Alexis 
Died at San Jese last week. Owned by C. F. White of Cosmopolis, Wash. 



one thousand pounds live weight in the 
case of calves, yearlings, two and three- 
year-olds, that the profit for each one 
thousand pounds was: 

For calves $31 00 

For yearlings 27 00 

For two-year-olds 19 10 

For theee-year-olds 12 80 

When all of the cattle of all ages were 
purchased at 4 cents a pound and sold fat 
at 5 cents a pound, the profit on $1000 in- 
vested in feeding cattle was : 

For calves $557 50 

Foryearlings 284 00 

For two-year-olds li'H 75 

For three-year-olds 17' 50 

Nirre-tenths of all the cattle fed in the 
Middle West are two-year-olds at the be- 
ginning of the feeding period. When 
these cattle are in thin condition at the 
beginning of the experiment, they are 
often fed with profit; but starting with 
calves in the same condition it is unques- 
tionably true that calves return more 
profit for each thousand dollars invested 
than older cattle.—^, li Mumford. 

Feeding Hogs Under Cattle. 

The practice of feeding hogs under 
cattle is doubtless profitable, and, while 
we would not condemn the practice, we 
think every one so engaged should, in 
consideration of the consumer, feed them 
on a clean ration of corn for awhile before 
consigning them to the butcher. Meat 
is undoubtedly tainted to some extent by 
filthy food, and nature should be given an 
opportunity to clean up — Farmer's Advo- 
cute. 

o 

Succulent feed increase the How of milk 
and an increased (low of milk show an in- 
crease in butterfat. More is the reason 
why you should alwava look ahead for 
keeping the cows in milk provided with a 
seasonable succulent food. 



runs up, in the aggregate, to many thou- 
sands of dollars annually. 

So far as known there has never been 
any complaint against the practice. 
Many persons acquainted with the sub- 
ect say that the grain pulp could not 
possibly injure cattle unless it had passed 
into a ttate of fermentation, and they add 
that cattle will not eat it after it haB fer- 
mented. It is pointed out that many 
farmers use largo quantities of beet pulp 
thrown out of the sugar factories, and 
that their cattle thrive exceedingly well 
upon it. — Watsonville Paiaioniun. 
o 

Butter as food is worth ten to fifteen 
cents a pound and the other ten or fifteen 
cents is the tribute for cleanliness, pains- 
taking and careful attention and exact- 
ness. It pays to go after the tribute. 



The early laying pullet is a good one to 
save. 

Sober up on Jackson'B Napa|3oda. 



There may be a look of sentimentality 
in donning a clean, white milking suit be- 
fore doing the milking, but there are 
greater evidences of cleanly intent in ap- 
pearances and that goes a long ways in 
creating the value of any commodity we 
consume. 

o 

What amount of experimenting with 
feeding have done this season and to 
what extent the results ? Have yoii ex- 
perimented any ? If you have, we ven- 
ture it has learned you something new. 
o 

A cow isn't healthy or in right condition 
that will not require from six to nine 
gallons of clean, fresh water every twenty- 
four hours, providing she can get it aa 
she wants it. 



McKINNEY GELDING 
FOR SALE. 

n r ; nrp Mark Hav Welding by McKlnncy; 
I IIIILC JTIdlR ltt hands; weighs 1100 pounds. 
First dam Princess Nona (full sister to Nance 
O'Nell &09M and Lady Rowena second 
dam Nona V 2:25 (dam of 3 In the 2:20 list); third 
dam Mack Flora (dam of 4 In the 2:30 list). 
PRINCE MACK is a lino park horse; has been 
driven by a lady He is a good prospect fora 
fast trotter if trained. For particulars call or 
address DAN LIliOINGER, 

801 Dovlsadero Street. 



12 



[February 4, 1905 



Lewis & Clark Exposition Nearing 
Completion. 

[By Frank I>. Herrlol!.] 

Portland, Jan. 25, 1905-Work on the 
grounds and buildings of the Lewis A 
Clark Exposition, which will be held at 
Portland, Oregon, this summer, opening 
June 1 and closing October 15, is progress- 
ing rapidly. Eight exhibit buildings 
have been completed and the installation 
of exhibits begun, while the remaining 
structures are nearing the stage where 
the finishing touches w.ll be applied. 
The mild Oregon winter has permitted 
the work to progress without an interrup- 
tion and when the President presses the 
button on opening day everything will be 
ready and waiting— something unusual in 
expositions. 

Not only are the buildings far advanced, 
but the landscape picture also The grass 
is green and roses bloom in the open air 
all the year round in Portland. Thousands 
of rose bushes have been set out on the 
lawns and terraces and theee, Kept fresh 
by the winter rains-Oregon knows no 
frost bites or sun strokes— are awaiting 
the spring sunshine to bring forth a riot 
of color. 

The Lewis & Clark Exposition although 
not so large as other expositions, will be 
a world's fair in every sense, reflecting 
the progress of all participating nations, 
and particularly of Western America. It 
will be quite unlike its predecessors in 
that it will combine with its broad scope 
the idea of compactness without crowding 
in the laying out of the grounds and the 
housing of the exhibits. There will be 
no dreariness of architecture to tire the 
eye, no miles of aisles to weary the limbs. 
All will be perfection, or at least the 
nearest thereto ever achieved by an ox- 
position. 

The Centennial, which is the first in- 
ternational exposition ever held under 
the patronage of the United States Gov- 
ernment west of the Rocky Mountains, 
will celebrate the 100th anniversity of the 
exploration of the Oregon Country by an 
expedition commanded by Captains Meri- 
wether Lewis and William Clark, and 
planned by President Jefferson. The 
sentiment which inspires the people of 
the Pacific Northwest in the preparation 
of this exposition is one in which every 
American must share. The result of this 
expedition is one in which every American 
must share. The result of this expedition 
the acquisition of the great Oregon 
Country by right of discovery, extended 
our frontier to the Pacific Ocean, adding 
a vaBt and rich territory to our domain. 
It was one of the direct causes of the ac- 
quisition of California and the subse- 
quent acquisitions of Alaska, Hawaii, 
Guam and the Philippines are related to 
it. 

The beauty of the exposition site and 



Warranted to CIve Satisfaction. 

Gomhault's 

Caustic Balsam 




Has Imitators But No Competitors. 

A Safe, Speedy and Positive Cure for 
Curb, Splir.t. Sweeny, Capped Hock, 
Strained Tendons, Founder, Wind 
Puffs, and all lar.nncss from Spavin, 
Ringbone and other bony tumors. 
Cures all skin diseases or Parasites, 
Thrush, Siphthena, Removes all 
Bunches from Horses or Cattle. 

As a Human Remedy for Rheumatism, 
Sprains, Sore Throat, etc., It Is invaluable. 

Brer; bottle or Caustic Balsam sold fs 
Warranted to (rive satlsiaction. I'rlce $1 60 
per bottle. Sold by druggists, or sent by ex- 
press, chanres paid, witn full directions for 
its use. t^TSend for descriptive circulars, 
testimonials, etc. Address 

The Lawrence-Williams Co., Cleveland, 



the superb view to be had from it, coupled 
with the artistic grace of the buildings in 
the style of the Spanish Renaissance, will 
be an agreeable surprise to all visitors. 
Nestling at the base of the foothills of the 
Cascade Range, on the gentle slopes and 
terraces overlooking the Williamette 
river, with an unobstructed view of 65 
miles which embraces the snow-capped 
peak of Mt. Hood and Mt. St. Helena. 
The sight presents a picture entirely 
original in exposition building. 

Of the gross area of the site, 180 acres 
are on the mainland and GO acres form a 
peninsula extending out from Guild's 
Lake, a fresh water body 220 acres in ex- 
tent and the largest mere ever enclosed 
within an exposition fence, which is sep- 
arated from the Williamette river by a 
narrow strip of land. The exposition 
grounds are made up of hill and dale, and 
n one portion a natural park of trees and 
shrubs affords an opportunity for land- 
scape work of amoBt attractive character. 
In the arrangement of the buildings 
thorough consideration has been given to 
the convenience of visitors and the attain 
tnent of a rich and beautiful architect- 
ural effect. The main group of exhibit 
palaces consisting of eight structures, oc- 
cupies the ground bordering on the lake, 
and forms nearly a straight line with 
their short sides facing the water. Around 
these structures on the outer edge, cluster 
the state, territorial and other minor 
pavilions. The administration building 
in which the executive offices of the Fair 
are located, stands at one end of the 
ornate colonnade entrance, the main gate- 
way to the grounds. 

On the peninsula in thecenter of Guild's 
Lake is located the United States Govern- 
ment displav. Here an imposing Govern- 
ment building with two towers each 260 
feet high, is in course of construction. 
Besides the main building there are 
several minor structures, among them 
being the Forestry, Fisheries und Irriga- 
tion pavilions and the Life Saving Station. 

All the main exposition structures are 
in the style of the Spanish Renaissance 
except the Forestry building which is a 
true American type, being constructed of 
huge logs in their virgin state, thus ex- 
emplifying in its composition the timber 
resources of the Columbia river region. 
The structure is 200 feet in length by 102 
feet in width and its extreme height is 70 
feet. In its construction two miles of five 
and six foot fir logs, eight miles of poles 
and tons of shakes and cedar shingles 
were used. 

The central features of the Exposition 
are Columbia Court and Lakeview Terrace 
These two spots have been made the 
object of elaborate embellishment. The 
former is situated between the Agriculture 
and the European exhibits buildings and 
consists of two wide avenues, between 
which are spacious sunken gardens. 
Lakeview Terrace is located on the slop- 
ing ground leading down to the lake and 
here is the Grand Stairway, flanked on 
either side with flower beds and beautiful 
lawns. 

The "Trail," which is the gaiety boule- 
vard of the Centennial, corresponding to 
the Pike at St. Louis and the midways of 
other expositions has an entirely original 
environment for this feature of a world's 
fair. It is situated upon an ornate bridge 
which spans the lake and connects the 
mainland with the peninsula. With the 
unrivaled water facilities thus offered 
much attention <vill be directed to con- 
cessions for aquatic features. 

The railroads have made exceptionally 
low rates to Portland from the Western 
World's Fair and many people in the East 
and Middle West are expected to take 
advantage of them to see the great Pacific 
Northwest. 



Modern Dairy Methods. 



Generally speaking, there is almost an 
entire lack of facilities for holding cream 
on the western farm. The majority of 
farms have wind pumps at or near the 
house. The pump furnishes an excellent 
location for an ideal milk house. On many 
farms visited the owner had built around 
the windmill tower or at one side of it a 
building, usually 6 by 8 feet, in which was 
placed a tank deep enough to set the 
milk cans and have water come up to their 
necks. All of the water pumped for 
stock and other purposes of the farm is 
run through the tank and then out into 
the stock tank. This room often contains 
the separator and a work table. In fact, 
here is done the dairy work of the farm. 
With an arrangement of this kind and a 
good thermometer the cream should be 
kept without difficulty from forty-eight 
to seventy-two hours in the hottest 
weather. Such a building costs but little 
and the convenience of having a place for 
the milk, cream and dairy utensils is in 
itself enough to justify the expense of 
building it. As a matter of fact, the 
farmer who is going to get the best price 
for his cream will have to provide himself 
with a place to keep it cool until it can be 
delivered to the station. Keep it just as 
cool as is possible without freezing up to 
the time it is delivered. 

There are some points besides the im- 
mediate cooling and holding at a cool 
temperature that must be observed in 
order to insure good cream. The different 
skimmings of cream should never be 
mixed until both are of the same tem- 
perature. The cream when cooled down 
keeps fairly well, but if some warm cream 
should be mixed with it the temperature 
will be raised. At once the germ life be- 
comes more active, and souring takes 
place very quickly. No vegetables or 
other produce having strong odors should 
be kept in the same room with the cream. 
It takes such odors very readily and re- 
tains them tenaciously. In fact, keep the 
milk room for milk and nothing else and, 
above all, have plenty of windows to admit 
sunshine when wanted and use plenty of 
"elbow grease" in keeping it sweet and 
clean. 

In many instances all the good work 
done is entirely spoiled because the cream 
is not cared for in delivery. The writer 
has observed many thousand cans in 
process of delivery, and in nearly 99 per 
cent of them the work was done in such 
a manner as to damage the cream. For 
some reason, probably through lack of 
better information on the part of the 
person delivering the cream and also on 
the part of the man receiving it, the 
cream was bandied as though no damage 
could come to it after it was taken away 
from the farm. It mattered not whether 
the heat of the summer's sun or the cold 
blast of the winter's storm was on, the 
can of cream was exposed to it all. With- 
draw the lid of a can of cream that has 
been expose to the heat for one or more 
hours, and the first whiff is a sour one. 
The cream will be found to be several 
degrees warmer than when taken from 
the water tank at the farm. 

It is a simple thing to cover the cream 
can with a wet sack or blanket and throw 
over this a dry one, which will effectually 
stop the mischief. With this precaution 
the cream will arrive at the station as 
cool as when taken from the farm. The 
same precaution, except that the blanket 
should be kept dry, is a sure protection 
against freezing in winter. 



Poor or musty grain isn't the cheapest 
for poultry even though it costs less than 
the other kind. 

o 

Too much poultry is hard to get on a 
farm where there is plenty of open range. 
o 

The best incubator made won't run 
itself. 



Read the manufacturers' directions for 
using the incubator. It's to his interest 
to tell you the best he knows. 

o 

A ditch around the coop may save a lot 
of young chicks. Dryness is to be con- 
sidered in poultry raising. 



An ointment of one part kerosene and 
two parts of lard is recommended by some 
breeders for scaly leg. 



Coops containing broods of chicks 
should be moved frequently. 



Tell 

Eastern 
Friends 

of the low rates 
which will be made to 

California 

March 1 to May 15, 1905 



$50 from NEW YORK 
$33 from CHICAGO 
$32 from ST. PAUL 
$25 from KANSAS CITY 

Similar rates from other points. 
Deposit cost of ticket with 
agent here, and ticket will be 
furnished passenger in the 
East. Tell your friends that 
now's the time to come cheaply 
If they buy their tickets via 

Southern Pacific 



ASK FOR PARTICULARS 

San Francisco Office 
613 Market Street 



Racing! Racing! 




New California Jockey Clib 
OAKLAND TRACK 

Burns Handicap 

$10,000 

To be Run SATURDAY, February 4. 

Racing Every Week Day 

RAIN OR SHINE. 

BACKS START AT 2:15 P. M. SHARP. 

For special trains stopping at the track take 
S. P. Ferry, foot of Market street, a) 12,12:30,1, 
1:30 or 2. 

Returning, trains leave the track at 4:10 and 
4:45 p. m., and immediately after the last race. 

THOMAS H. WILLIAMS, President. 
PERCY W. TREAT, Secretary. 



Any standard breed of poultry is good 
if you like it. 

o 

Sponges. S. Adderly, 307 Market St. 



# At the gt 
Tongues Endfl 

STOCK GET JUST ENOUGH 4! THE RIGHT TIME 

CDMPRE55CD PURE-SALT BRICKS. 
AND PATENT FEEDER! 

No wdste. no neglect.dll convenience 
Yourdtilerhisit Write us for the booh 

BELMONT STABLE SUPPLY CO. 

PATENTEES MANUFACTURERS 

Broohlyn. N.Y. 



February 4, 1905J 



18 



An Original Idea About Dairying. 

Several years ago a man of my ajquaint- 
ance decided to go into the dairy business 
quite extensively and took a novel way of 
getting a herd of good milch cows It is 
often said, you know, that it is impossible 
to buv a good cow. He went to eveiy 
auction sale held within fifty miles of his 
home and found out from the owner which 
were the best cows in his herd. Then, 
when they were sold, he was prepared to 
bid a trifle higher than aDy other man 
and thus secure the best cow or cows. 
Within a short time he got a herd of forty 
cows that were the best in the entire 
community, judging from the amount of 
milk which they gave. 

Another way, although not quite as 
rapid, is to purchase at an auction sale 
the calves and yearling heifers and take 
the chances that such calves are from tie 
best cows. In a few years a herd of 
splendid cows may be built up and the 
expense will not be excessive. Within 
the last ten years or so experiments have 
been carried on at the different stations 
to determine the cost of keeping a milk 
cow for a year and it has varied all the 
way from $30 to $60. It all depends on 
bow the figures were kept and whether 
the price of the hired help was figured 
into the account In one experiment it 
was claimed that butter could be made as 
low as eight cents a pound. This was one 
of the cases where the manure was taken 
for the help's pay and the price of mak- 
ing the butter was left out entirely. This 
should have been added certainly and 
would have made it from two to four 
cents a pound higher at least 

I never knew of but one instance where 
a man tried the experiment of buying 
everything at the market price of feed and 
selling his butter at the prevailing butter 
prices and he found it impossible to make 
any moneyat the business and butter was 
never as low as eightcents a pound either. 
But one icicle does not make a winter in 
this country and one experiment does not 
prove much, especially with a cow and if 
there was as large a margin of profit 
in dairying as some of these experiment 
stations claim it would seem as if there 
would be plenty of people who would go 
into the business even if they did have to 
buy everything they fed their cows at 
market prices and take the prevailing rate 
fo butter. The facts are that as few if any 
people practice this method it proves most 
conclusively that a great many of thesa 
experiments have little value attached to 
them. 

But here is an example of the highest 
excellence in dairy farming which I be- 
lieve will hold true every time and that 
is that at the present so many men with 
plenty of money are engaged in the dairy 
business that if a dairyman, large or 
small, is only possessed of the ability to 
raise a herd of dairy cows of high excel- 
lence he will have no trouble in selling 
the calves from these cows for far more 
money than he will be able to obtain for 
the butter these cows will make during 
a year and not only sell them for higher 
prices, but will in a great many cases be 
able to sell the calves in advance of their 
birth. If there is any other industry 
where ability is better remunerated than 
the dairy business I have failed to dis- 
cover it as yet. — A. C. Stiles in Field and 
Fancy. 

If you are "trading" your farm male 
butter at the grocery store for coffee, 
sugar and tobacco, you are encouraging 
the manufacture of "renovated" or 
"process" butter, which you pretend to 
despise and hold up as a thorn in the 
path of dairy butter. Don't encourage 
the industry by making butter of such a 
grade that the only demand and market 
for it is at your grocers. If you can't 
make a grade of butter that you can con- 
tract in advance to the consumer, you 
had better read up a little more on dairy- 
ing and subscribe for a few dairy papers. 
o 

No matter what breed you have it takes 
care to make fine fowls. 



it 



A5 THEY 

SONfTIMES 

ARE 



SAVE-THE-HORSE" SPAVIN CURE 

Send for Copies and Booklet. B 



REGISTERED TRADE MARK 

SCORES OF LETTERS TO 
CONFIRM AND CONViNCE 



Absolute and overwhelming evidence and certainties as to the marvelous and unfailing 
power of "SAVE-THE-HORSE" on every kind and condition of case. 



Coach Service Telephone 116 

For All Occasions. 

BENNETT'S STABLES 
LIVERY AND BOARDING 

66 West Main Street 

Mlddletown, N. Y., 12-8, 1904. 
Gentlemen:— 'Sate- the-Horse" m a sure 
thiog. Send me 3 bottles more aton;e. 
Goods are as you represent. 

Yours truly, 

C. F. Bennett. 



VVM. F. SELLERS 
Practical Horseshoeing 
614-16 Jefferson Street 

Philadelphia, Pa., Nov 20. 1904. 
I cured a bad bone spavin with less than 
half a bottle or "Save-the-Horse"; gave 
the rest of tho bottle to another party who 
also cured a spavin with it. "Save-the- 
Horse" certainly is a marvelous remedy. 
Yours truly, 

W. F. Sellers. 



5AVE THE-H0RSE 



' Save- the- Horse" is indicated for any enlargement caused by an injury which leaves a thickened condition of the tissues 

POSITIVELY AND PERMANENTLY CURES BONE AND BOG SPAVIN, THOROUGH PIN, RINGBONK „,„.„„„,,, rimn 

SPLINT, CAPPED HOCK, W1NDPUFF, SHOE BOIL, WEAK AND SPRAINED AND RUPTURED TENDONS |, LAMENESS ' 

Can apply in all conditions and extremes of weather. Horses may be worked as usual with shin or ankle boots, as no harm can result from destruc 
tion of hair or scalding of limb. »5 per bottle with written guarantee. All druggists and dealers or express prepaid by 

TROY CHEMICAL CO., Manufacturers, BINGHAMTON, N. Y, (formerly of Troy, N. Y.) 

D. E. NEWELL,, Pacific Coast Agent, 519 Mission St., San Francisco. 



Good Ones For Sale. 



Sonoma Boy. 



A beautiful Hambletonian 
bred stallion by Romeo, he 
by Ulster Chief; dam by Washington; 2d dam by 
Williamson's Belmont. Ten years old, sound, in- 
telligent, and so gentle that a child can drive him 
by day or night. He is a very sure foal getter 
and has sired many of the best road horses in the 
country out of common-bred mares. 

Clydesdale Stallion SSlln^SSM! 

when matured. A magnificent specimen; hand- 
some dappled mahogany bay in color: sired by 
the great sire and prize winner, Pollock by imp. 
Model Prince; dam sired by imp. Capt. Sefton; 
2d dam by imp. Pride of Cree. 
DnWnrh- ° ne ° r tne handsomest and finest 
rUIIUllt Clydesdale Stallions on the Coast, 
and a very desirable animal in every respect A 
big prize winner and a sire of prizewinners. A 
sure foal getter. Excellent disposition, good 
action and good color. 
For further particulars see or address 

DR. T. A. HOFER, 
Box 133, Petalnma Cal. 



Good Ones For Sale. 

AS I HAVE NOT THE TIME NEEDED TO 
devote to my horses, I am offering the entire 
lot for sale, consisting of 

Pflttip Wflldsfpin 8 years, by Waldstein; 
raillC WitlUMCill, dam PattieP. by Rich- 
mond She is heavy in foal to Nushagak and is 
nominated in the PaciSo Breeders Futurity 
Stakes No. 5, J7000 guaranteed. She is a fine 
mare of excellent breeding and her foal should 
be a great prospect 

Pflnrp I yearling by Prince Ansel; dam 
rilllbC L., PattleP. Is entered in Breeders 
Futurity Stakes No. 4 and payments made to 
date. He is a fine, large colt and a good prospect. 

TriYV By Gold Rose; dam by Berger. She is 
IIIaj. a na |{ s igter to Advocatrix and is 
heavy in foal to a good son of Stam B. and is also 
nominated in Breeders Futurity Stakes. 
HqHia I 5 years old; by Gold Rose; dam 
HdlUC U. by Don. Is a half sister to Hattie 
B. 2:20!4 by Alex Button. Is also heavy in foal 
to a son of Stam B. 

One Two- Year-Old. Ke c p atus; dam 
One Five=Year=01d. %T 

dam by Whippleton. 

The above are all well broken, good individ- 
uals and fine drivers. 
Send all communications to 

GEO. H. LENT, 
Isleton, Sacramento River, Cal 



Wanted to Train 

A FTER FEBRUARY 15th I WILL BE Lo- 
cated at the San Jose Race Track, and will 
take a few mote horses to train and, if desired, 
will campaign them next season. 
Present address: JACK CURRY, 

2605 Point Lobos Avenue, 
San Francisco, Cal. 



CATTLE RANCH FOR SALE. 

1 7Kfi A nroa SONOMA COUNTY, LYING 
Lt'jyj iiLlCS. west of Skaggs Springs; Gua- 
lala river runs through ranch; fine feed; scatter- 
ing timber and tanbark plentiful; numerous 
springs; 8 acres tn fruit; 40 In grain; houso, barn, 
corrals, chicken houses, etc.; grand trout stream 
and deer plentiful; 3000 acres fenced. Price of 
the 1750 aeri.s deeded land, 112,000. 

D. M. HANLON, 
169 Crocker Bldg, San Francisco. 



STOCK FARM FOR SALE. 

l^INE 3TOCK FARM, HIGHLY IMPROVED, 
" In choice location in California, for sale. 
Address Bkbkder and Sportsman. 



672-680 11th Ave. 
Back of The Chutes. 



All kinds of Horses 
bought and sold. 



THE ZIBBELL STABLE 

Z1BBELL & SON, Proprietors 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Our Specialty: 
Boarding, Training and 
Handling all kinds of 
Fanoy Horses. 

A few Nice Rigs always on hand 



Take any car going 
to The Chutes 



Percheron Stallion 

FOR SALE. 

ppv (REG. No. 39793); FOUR YEARS 
* VL, -' V old; dark iron grey; will weigh 1800 or 
more when mature. Price $500. Address 

H. T. LILIENCRAN1 Z, 
Aptos, Santa Cruz Co., Cal. 



McKINNEY FILLY FOR SALE. 

A TWO-YEAR-OLD FILLY SIRED BY Mc- 
Kinney; dam is a half-sister of Graoe Kaiser 
(the dam of Coney 2:02, McZeus 2:13, Grace McK. 
2:21, Stipulator 2:11 and four others better than 
30>. being sired by Kaiser, he by Geo. Wilkes. 
This Ally is now at the track, and with two 
months' work shows quarters in 35 seconds. 

W. H. YOUNG, 
337 S. Hill St., Los Angeles, Cal. 



WANTED TO LEASE. 

^ McKINNEY STALLION FOR PUBLIC 
use, on shares or otherwise. Must be a pure 
gaited trotter and out of a gcod individual mare. 
This is a rare opportunity for a horse of merit to 
make a reputation. Address M. L. L., in care of 
Breeder and Sportsman. 



A 



GOOD JACK FOR SALE. 

FIRST-CLASS FOUR-YEAR-OLD JACK, 
fine individual and sure foal getter Address 
HENRY KLEMP, 
2917 G St., Sacramento, Cal. 



OPPORTUNITY OFFERED FOR AN IN- 
vestment of from $3000 to $5000, on which a 
profit of at least 10 per cent can be made within 
three months. Full particulars given on applica- 
tion. This is a legitimate proposition, and one 
that will bear the closest Investigation. Address 
"OPPORTUNITY," Breeder and Sportsman 
Office, San Francisco, Cal. 



| McMURRAY | 



POINTS: 

Perfect Construction 
Light Weights, 
Great Strength, 
Easy Running, 
And LOW PRICES. 

McMURRAY SULKIES 

and JOGGING CARTS 

STANDARD THE WORLD OVER. 

*J-Address, for printed matter and prices, 

W. J. KENNEY 

531 Valencia St., San Francisco, Cal. 



Can You Shave? 

Rub a little "3 in One" 
on your razor strop till 
leather becomes soft and 
pliable ; draw razor blade 
between thumb o:id finder 
~ moistened witli "J In One"; 
j then strop. The razor cuts 
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holds the edge longer. "A 
Razor Saver for Every 
Shaver" which gives the 
scientific reasons, and a, 
generous trial bottle sent I 
free. Write to-day. 
I. W. COLE CO. 
128 WsshlnHlon Life BM« > 
New tort 



FOR SALE. 

GEO. W. McKINNEY 2:14 1-4 

TS A HANDSOME BLOOD BAY, WITH STAR 
"~ in his forehead and one white foot. Stands 16 
hands and 1 inch; weighs 1250 lbs. Individually 
he is a horse of grand finish and plenty of sub- 
stance. Has a fine disposition, strong shoulders, 
stout back, very strong loins and stifles, strong 
bone, with good feet and legs He is sire* by the 
great McKinney 2:11K His dam, Lady Washing- 
ton 2:35. had 5 colls— Geo. W. McKinney 2:!4W. 
El Molina 2:20. Washington McKinney (trial 
2:22!4)— was by Whipple, No. 8951: grandam Lady 
Mayberry, dam of Dubeo 2:16 and others. 

Horse is now at Hemet, Cal. For particulars 
address w. F. WHITTIER, 

20 Fremont St , San Francisco, Cal. 
Or F. H. HOLLOWAY, Hemet, Cal. 



STALLIONS FOR SALE. 

Dictator Wilkp« son of tne great Dicta- 
isiwaiui YY1IK.CS, torand Manola by Geo. 
Wilkes, second dam the great broodmare Lizzie 
Brlnker by Drennon. DICTATOR WILKES is a 
dark bay horse with size, style and excellent con- 
formation He stands 15 3 and weighs 1100. Was 
never worked for speed except a little as a two- 
year-old, when he was very promising. He is the 
sire of Monroe S. 2:13y and other very fast trot- 
ters and pacers. 

Tpmpsml son of p » l0 A 't° 2:08?* and Telle 
luiicstdi, (dam Qf Truman 2:18 and two 

others in the list) by Gen. Benton. TEMESCAL 
is a handsome chestnut, stands 16 2, weighs 1250 
pounds, has an excellent disposition and size and 
style. But one of his get has ever been worked, a 
Ally out of a Dexter Prince mare, and she shows 
much speed and great promise. 
For prices and further particulars address 



oc22eow 



W. A. SHIPPEE, 
Nelson, Butte Co, Cal. 



Two Prince Airlie Stallions For Sale. 

MILBRAE 3:16 IS ^^^l^sfre^f 
Fred Kohl 2:07^, Hulda 2:08!4, Seymour Wilkes 
2:08!4; 1st dam Fearless by Fallls 4781 (reo. 2:23), 
sire of John R. Baldwin 2:17^, Fallacy 2:17(4, Fal- 
rose 2:19, and dam of Janice 2-0854; ™ dam Jean 
Perault by Signal 3327. MILBRAE has been in 
training just one year, getting a trotting record 
of 2:16!* (trial 2:13) with first half in 1:05, a quar- 
ter in :3l<4. This Is no measure of his speed. He 
is a seal brown, 16 hands, weighs 1200 pounds, 8 
ycarsold- 

UENLO BOY 37401 by Prince Alrlle 28015 by 
Guy Wilkes 2:15*: 1st 
dam Signal by Del Sur 1098, grandam Lady Signal 
by Signal 3327. With very little work he has 
trotted in 2:29!^, quartors in :35. He is a brown 
with white pasterns, 16.1 hands, weighs about 
1170, and 5 years old. 
For further information apply to 

P. H. McEVOY, Menlo Park, Cal 

FOR SALE. 

A HANDSOME 4-YEAR-OLD BAY FILLY; 

paoer; stands \S.2% hands; sired by McKin- 
ney, dam Mission Bell by St. Nicholas. Full sis- 
ter to Mechanic A smooth-gaited filly, goes 
without straps or boots, and with less than a 
month's handling has paced a half in 1:11. Is sure 
to make a fast pacer. Address or apply to JOHN 
ROWAN, 1347 East South Street, Stockton, Cal. 



Team For Sale. 

A FINE TEAM OF YOUNG COLTS— STAL- 
lions— by a good sofa of Director. One 3 and 
one 4 yearsold. Well matched and well broken, 
gentle and drive well together. Good / slze, fine 
individuals dark brown in color. Address 
HENRY KLEMP. 
2917 G St., Sacramento. Cal. 



Training, Boarding and Sale Stables 

Fulton St. & 24th Ave., opposite the Casino. 

Hoarding and Training Horses a Specially. 

Horses for sale. Two Ideal roadsters now on 
hand. Will show a quarter In 32 seconds, pulling 
a buggy. Stand 16 bands, weigh 1200. Ready 
for inspection .at any time. 

Telephone: Park 377. T. C. CABNEY. 



C0C0ANUT OIL CAKE 

THE BEST FEEO FOR 

STOCK, CHICKENS AND PldS 

FO It SALE IN 1.0TS TO 8DIT BT 

EL DORADO LINSEED OIL WORKS CO 
308 California Street, Ban Francisco, Cal 



14 



(.February 4, 1905 




THE BAYWOOD STUD 

THE BUNGALOW, SAN MATEO, CAL. 

(Property of Jobs Parrott, Esq.) 
Devoted Exclusively to the Breeding and Training of 

High Stepping 
Hackney Bred 
Harness Horses 

WALTER SEAL!, Manager. 



A GREAT RACEHORSE AND A GREAT SIRE. 

DIABLO 2:091-4 




Hls2:151tst IncludesSir Albert S. 2:03»i, Cllpper2:06 Dl 
abllto gtOBK, Tom Carneal 2:08'/ 2 Daedallon 2:10. Diod ne 
2:10*. Diaw..od2:ll. El Diablo 2:1 1«, Tags 2:11*. Hijo, 
el Diablo 2: 1 1 %. Rey del Diablo 2: MM aDd Ioferno 2: 15. 

Diablo's Sire, Ctaas. Derby 2:20, ^01 

Don Derby 2:04>4. Much Better »:07M, Derby Princes* 
2 08!4 DIABLO 2:09M. and 12 more with records better 
tharj 2:15 Hfs grandaire, Steinway 2:25?£. hassired Ave 
In the 2:10 list, and his great grandsire, Strathmore, 
sired two and the dams of four 2:10 performers. 

Diablo's Dam, Bertha 

greatest broodmare in 
California. She has three 2:10 performers and five 2:15 
performers. Her sire has six in the 2:10 list and his 
daughters have produced eight in the 2: 10 list. 

SEASON OF 1905 AT WOODLAND. 



Address 



FEE. 840 FOR Till: SEASON. 
S60 TO INSURE. 



C. D. CROOKHAM, 

WOODLAND, CAL. 



ZOLOCK 



Reg. No. 34471 

Eace Record 2:091 



SIRE OF 




Fee, $50 for the Season, 

Usual Return Privileges. 



DELILAH (2) 2:16 1-2. AMBUSH (2) 2:20. 

ZOLOCK 2:09* is by McKinney 2:11* (sire of 11 In 
2:10 list): dam Gazelle fcUVt (dam of Zolock2:09'4 and 
Zephvr2:Il) by Gosslper 2:14*£ (sire of Gazelle 2: 11 V„ 
Miss"jessle2:i:Pi.ctc ): second dam Glpsey (dam of 
Gazelle 2:11M. Ed Winshlp 2:15, etc ) by Gen. Booth. 
From Zolock's first crop of colts came Delilah 2:IS*, 
winner of two-vear-old pacing division of Breeders 
Futurity of 1901 and fastest pacing two-year-old of 
1904, and Ambush, two year-old trotting record 2:20. 
Will Make the Season of 1905 at 

Agricultural Park, Los Angeles. 

For Tabulated Pedigree and further particulars 

address 

HENRY DELANEY. Agent, 

UNIVERSITY POSTOFFICE, CAL. 



HAL B. 2:04 



The Only High-Class "Hal" Stallion 
the Pacific Coast 



on 



H AX B 2 04'/a was the sensation of the Grand Circuit In 1899, in which he started nine times, 
winning all his races. He was the largest money winner of that season. HAL B. is full brother to 
Fanny Dlllard 2:03«, world's race record for pacing mares. At 11 years of age he Is the sire or rour 
in the list. HAL B. is by Hal Dlllard 2:01?i (sire of Fanny Dlllard 2:03*. Hal B. 2:04 H, Hal Clipper 
2:07'4. Camblna Maid 2:081-4", Young Hal 2:10*. Hallle Rackett 2:11, trotting, etc ), dam E la (dam of 
Fanny Dillard fcOS* and Hal B. 2:04'/,) by Blue Boy, son of Blue Bull 75; second dam by Blue Bull ,r> 

HAL B Is a handsome dark bay or brown stallion, stands 15.3V4 hands and is an ideal horse in 
every particular. Remember this is your opportunity at home to breed to a distinguished represent 
ative of the great Tennessee pacing family, "The Hals." 

Season at Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, until April 15, 1905. 

All correspondence concerning HAL B. while on this Coast should be addressed to 
T t^ft filch OMER VAN KIRK, 

1 ermS, JtfU Lasll. University P. O., Log Angeles, Cal. 

Money refunded if mare proves not with foal. 
D. H. MAST, Owner, West Milton, Ohio. Reference: West Milton Bank. 



MONTEREY 2:09 1-4 

(Sire of Irish 2:(WX, Fastest Four-Year-Old Pacer of 1904) 
By SIDNEY (Oraudslre of LOU DILLON 1:58V4) 
Dam HATTIE (also dam of MONTANA 2:16). 
WILL MAKE THE SEASON OF 1905 AT 



Reg. No. 
31706 



SATURDAYS, SUNDAYS, 
MONDAYS, TUESDAYS. 



SAN LORENZO 

Fee $50 * 

pedigree and full particulars. Address 



MILPITAS 



WEDNESDAYS, THURS- 
DAYS and FRIDAYS. 



Caa tCO FOR THE SEASON. Good pasturage at $3 per month. Best of care taken of 

ree *«JU ma rus, but no responsibility for accidents or escapes Send for 



card containing 
P. J. WILLIAMS, San Lorenzo, Cal. 



IRAN A LXO 24586— Trotting Race Record 2:12}. 

The only stallion with so fast a record whose sire and dam held world's records. His sire Is Palo 
Alto " 08X by Electioneer: his dam is Elaine 2:20. champion three-year-old of her day, and the dam 
of four and grandam of twelve in the list; second dam the great Green Mountain Maid, dam of nine 
in the list and also dam of the great Electioneer. , . „ 

IRAN ALTO'S first colt took a record of 2:12V4 trotting, and he has sired five mo.-e In the list. 
Will make the Season of 1905 In charge of 

$40 for the Season. H. S. HOGOBOOM, Woodland, Cal. 




INFLUENZA, DISTEMPER, EPIZOOTIC, 
COUGHS, COLDS and Similar Diseases 

Are just waiting for a chance at your horses. IT IS UP TO YOU to fool 
tbem all with CRAFT'S DISTEMPER & COUGH CURE the time-tried 
and stable-tested remedy It is guaranteed to oure. You take no risk! A 
few doses often cube. Used as a tonic in advance will always prevent the 
above-named diseases. Free booklet, ' Practical Pointers," for the asking. 
At druggists, or direct, 50c and J! a bottle. 

Wells Medicine Co. SSTiu* 13 3d st, Lafayette, Ind, 



The Fastest Trotting: Son of McKINNEY 

KINNEY LOU 2:071 

(WINNER OF 811,450 IN 1903) 

Will make the Season of 1905 at 

AGRICULTURAL PARK, SAN JOSE. 

SERVICE FEE, $100. 

SEASON ENDS JULY 1, 1905. 

KINNEY LOU was one of the great race winners of 1903 
on the Grand Circuit, and is a high class racehorse, game as 
a pebble and perfectly eaited. He is from race winning and 
producing families on both sides, his dam, Mary Lou 2:17, 
being a great race mare and own sister to the well-known 
racehorses Shylock 2:15V4 and Ned Winslow 2:125£ Mary 
Lou is by Tom Benton out of Brown Jenny (dam of 3 in list) 
by Dave Hill Jr ; next dam by Black Hawk ?67 KINNEY 
LOU'S oldest colts are three-year-olds and all have size, 
good color, and are natural trotters with good dispositions. 
For further particulars and card containing Tabulated Pedigree, address 

BUDD DOBLE, San Jose, Cal. 




MENDOCINO 22607 

RECORD (THREE-YEAR-OLD) 2:19H 

Sire of Monte Carlo 2:07* (to wagon 2:0854); Idoiita (2 y. o.) 2:2t*. (3 y o ) 2:12, (a) 2:09*, etc. Bay 
Stallion. 15 34 hands; weight 1 190 pounds; hind feet and ankles white; foaled April 24, 1889. 
Bred at Palo Alto S ock Farm. 

Sire, ELECTIONEER 125. son of Hambletonian 10. First dam. M AND (dam of Mendocino (3) 
2:19V,. Electant2:19V4, Morocco (3 y o trial) 2:22) by Piedmont 904 , 2:17*; second dam. Mamie 
(dam or Mamie W. (3) 2:17*. Hyperion 2:21^, Memento 2:25*. Mitbra (p) 2:14*) by Hamble- 
tonian Jr. 1882; third dam, Gilda (thoroughbred) by imp Mango. 
MENDOCINO is one of Electioneer's youngest and best sons With very limited opportunities 

in the stud he has proven his worth by producing such racehorses as Monte Carlo and Idolita. His 

foals are good size, fine lookers, bold and pure gaited and easily developed. 

SERVICE FEE for Season of 1905, 8100; usual return privilege. 

MCKENA 39460 

Brown Stallion; 16 2 hands; weight 1350 pounds; foaled April 1 1, 1900. Bred at Palo Alto Stock Farm 
Sire, McKINNEY 8818 (record 2:11*. First dam. HELENA 2:11* (dam of Wildnutling 2:11*« 
Dobbel2:22, Hyita (trial) 2:12) by Electioneer 125; second dam. Lady Ellen 2:2914 (dam of six in 
list, including Helena 2:11*. Ellen Wood 2:14*) by Mambrino 1789; third dam, Ida May Jr. by 
Owen Dale; fourth dam, Ida May by Belmont ( Williamson's). 
McKENA was bred to fifteen mares in 1934 and has proven a sure foal getter. He should make a 
great sire as he is a fine individual and bred right. His sire, McKlnney , a game and fast racehorse 
and sire or game and ran rassnorses His dam. Helena one of the fastest and gamest daughters of 
Electioneer, the greatest sire of trotters the world has yet known. His second dam, Lady Ellen, was 
one of the best of her day. and as well as ner daughter Helena is a great brooJmare. 
SERVICE FEE for Season of 1905, 835; o«ual return privilege. 

MENDOCINO and McKENA will make the season at PALO ALTO STOCK FARM. Mares 

may run on pasture at $5 per month. No responsibility assumed by the Palo Alto Stock Farm for 
injury or escapes Address all communications to 

PALO ALTO STOCK FARM, 
Stanford Uulverslty. Santa Clara Co., Cal. 



ZOMBRO 2:11 

Will make the Season of 1905, from February 1st to June 1st, 
At 4645 Agricultural Ave., adjoining Agricultural Park, Los Angeles, Cal. 



GREATEST SON 
OP 

McKINNEY 2:1 li 



Fee, $50 for the Season, 



With return privilege If the 
Mare proves not with Foal 



ZOMBRO is the sire of the fastest two-year-old trotting ally of 1904, sire of the winner of two- 
year-old trotting division of Pacilie Breeders Futurity, sire of the fastest two year-old in Oregon last 
year and of the winner of the Oregon two-yearold stake, in which the Zombros won first and third 
money. ZOMBRO has sired more 2:30 performers than all the rest of McKinney's sons put together. 
He has seven in the list and thirty more ready to drop In His standard performers are Zephvr 2:11, 
Zombowyette 2:18, Tee Dee Gee 2:19*. Uellemont (2) 2:204. Italia 2:23H, Lord Kitchener 2:24V4. and 
Lady Zombro 2:24!4— all trotters. ZOMBRO Is the only horse living or dead that ever won 40 heats 
In standard time as a three-year-old. His get are all large, beautifully formed and endowed with 
great natural speed. The choicest pasture for mares. Address 

GEO. T. DECKERS, University, Cal. 



BREED TO A SIRE OF GRAND CIRCUIT WINNERS. 

STRATHWAY 2:19 

[Recoup Made to High-Wheel Sulky] 
(REGISTER NO. 13214) 
Sire <>f Toggles 2:08'$, John Caldwell mi, (In the money 12 times out of 15 starU), 
Homeward 2:13* (aire of George G. 2:O0*), Strathmont BtLSJfi Cuckoo 8:13, etc. 

Graham E Baboock. the owner, has decided to send STRATHWAY, the greatest producing trot- 
ting son of the great Steinway, to Pleasanton for the season of 1905, beginning February 10th. 
STRATHWAY never had a chance till in the last couple of years, always being in a country where 
good mares were scarce; but he is sure to be one of the greatest sires of California. 

STRATHWAY 3: 19 is by the great Steinway 2:25*i and his dam is the great broodmare Countess 
(the dam of Dawn '2:18^) by Whipple's Hambletonian 725, sire or the dam of Azote 2:043£, Georgena 
2:074, etc Steinway sired Klatawah 2:05'j champion three-year-old; W. Wood 2:07, Agitato 2:09, 
Cricket 2:10, Silver Coin 2:10 and 8 more with records below 2:15. His sons have produced Don Derby 
2 04*. WinQeld Stratton 2:05^ and many more with records below 2:10. His daughters have produced 
Stanley Dillon 2:07^, winner of the M. & M of 190); Tuna 2:084, fastest four-year-old trotting mare of 
1904; Ben F.2:09*, one of the best winners on the Grand Circuit of 1904, and many others In the 2:10 list. 

STRATHWAY will make the Season of 1905 at SANTA RITA STOCK FARM, near 
PLEASANTON, CAL Fee »60 for the Seaion, with nsual return privileges. 

Plenty of good pasture for mares at S4 per month, at owner's risk. The veteran handler, 
Humphrey Sullivan, will have charge or the ho-se Address 

S. CHRISTEN SON, Palace Hotel, San Francisco, Cal. 

Or JAMES THOMPSON, Pleasanton, Cal. 



McKINNEY DIRECTOR NUTWOOD 

THE STANDARD-BREW TROTTING STALLION 

MAC DIRECT 

By McKinney 2:11}; dam Twenty-Third by Director 2:17; second dam Nettie 
Nutwood (dam of Hillsdale 2:15}) by Nutwood 600. 

Will Make the Season of 1905 at PALO ALTO, Cal. 



Terms, $40 for the Season. 

To Close July 1st. 

Address or apply to 



Excellent Pasturage at Reasonable Rates. No 
barbed wire. Best or care taken of Mares, in 
any manner Owners may desire. 

CAPT. C. H. WILLIAMS, 

Box 161. PALO ALTO, CAL. 



February 4, 1905 1 



15 



NEW PRICE 



No. 00 Armour Steel 
L. C, SMITH GUN 



All Gun, No Extras. 




1 EKS ONLY. 

Send for Catalogue 



HUNTER ARMS CO., Fulton, M. Y. 





NEW MODEL 
AUTOMATIC 
EJECTOR 




NO, i List. 



WARRANTED SUPERIOR TO ANY OTHER 
C MAKE COSTING. 25S MORE 



We Make 16 Qrades, $17 75 to $300. 



Write for ART CATALOG to 



THE ITHACA GUN CO., Ithaca, N. Y. 

° r Coa st Branch, PHIL B. BEKEART CO., 114 Second St., San Francisco 

SHREVE & BARBER CO. 



PIONEER DEALERS 



739 
Market St. 

Send for 
Catalogue 




521 
Kearny St. 

Mailorders 
a Specialty 



GUNS, AMMUNITION, FISHING TACKLE AND SPORTING GOODS 



SAN FRANCISCO, 



CALIFORNIA. 



YOU obtain more Real Value in the 
PARKER GUN 

than any other. 



NEVER 
MISSED FIRE 
YET 

BEST 

EVER 

MADE 




Do yon Intend to buy a Gun in 1905? If you do, you will do well 
to keep In touch with Parker Bros. You can have the benefit of 
their experience by asking for it. Send today for Catalogue. 



30 CHERRY STREET MERIDEN, CONN. 



T M. LITCHFIELD & CO —Drivers' Suits, 
" • Colors and Caps, Official Badges. Corre- 
spondence solicited. 12 Pont St., San Francisco. 



Mark Levy & Co. 



BREEDERS' DIRECTORY. 



SHORTHORNS— QUINTO HERD— 77 pre 
mlums Cal State Pair 1902-3-4. YouDg stork for 
sale. Write us what you want. Est. of W. H. 
Howard, 206 Sansome St., San Francisco. 



SHIRE HORSES (four Stallions, foals of 
1902) sired by British Oak, No. 5687, A. S. H. A., 
Sweepstakes Drafter at California State Fairs 
Estate of W. H. Howard, 206 Sansome Street 
San Francisco. 



PETER SAXK & SON. Liok House, S. F..Cal. 
Importers, Breeders and Dealers for past 30 years. 
All varieties Cattle, Horses, Sheep, Hogs. High- 
olass breeding stock. Correspondence solicited 



HOLSTEIN8— BUTTER BRED FAMILIES. 
Work herd; 90% winners at Stat.! and county fairs, 
show ring, and every butter content since 18851c 
California No reservations. Stock near S. F 
F. H. Burke, 30 Montgomery St., San Francisco. 

JERSEYS, HOLSTEIN8 AND DURH AM8. 
Dairy Stock specially. Hogs, Poultry. Estab- 
lished 1876. William Nlles & Co.. I.os Angeles 
Oal. 




Onlt lh«' 
Br.i ll,tp 
''Employed... 
All worK . 
Annt on (he . 



36G«ry St.. 5 F. t{„omt 19 20 . PhoncGrjnl I5S 



Photo Engraving Company 

HIGH CLASS ART 
IN 

Half Tones and Line Engraving 
Artistic Designing. 
SOB MlMlon St., cor. First, San Franctaou. 



CALIFORNIA 

NORTHWESTERN RAILWAY 

Through Picturesque California. 

The Ideal Route for 

Ttie ADEler and Ontioc Trips 

One day's ride from San Francisco will take 
you to some of the finest Trout Streams in the 
State. Along the line and within easy distance 
are many of the best Springs and Summer Resorts 
In the State. The Company maintains a Fish 
Hatchery and annually stooks the many streams 
reached by its road. One million Trout Fry were 
planted last year In these streams. 

Black Bass Fishing can be enjoyed In Russian 
River near Guerneville, Guernewood Park and 
Camp Vacation, in season. 

The best Striped Bass Fishing waters on the 
Coast reached by the Tiburon Ferry. 

VACATION FOR 1904 

Issued annualls by the Company, is now ready. 
This is the standard publication on the Coast for 
information regarding Mineral Springs, Resorts, 
Country Homes and Farms where summer board- 
ers are taken, and Select Camping Spots. 

Beautifully illustrated, 150 pp. and can be had 
In response to mall request or at ticket offices. 

Ticket Offices— 650 Market Street (Chronicle 
Bldg) and Tiburon Ferry, foot of Market Street. 

General Office— Mutual Life Ins. Bldg., cor. 
Sansome and California Sts., San Francisco. 



AT STUD 



CUBA OF* KENWOOD 

(Glenbeigh Jr.-8tella) 

SAM'S BOW 

(Plain Sam-Dolly Dee II) 

STOCKDALE KENNELS 

K. M. DODGE, Manager, 
Bakersfleld, Kern Co., 
Boarding. Pointer Puppies and well-broken 
Dogs for sale. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENTS 



JAS. L FRAZIER, 
Gen. Mgr. 



R. X. RYAN, 
Gen. Pass. Agt. 



ROOS RROS. 

Outfitters 
to 



MEN 



25 to 27 



BOYS 
KEARNY ST. 

at POST 



ABSORBINE 

. . Removes the Inflamma- 
tion and Bunch. Restores 
the Circulation in any Bruise 
or Thickened Tissue. Does 
not remove the Hair. 

Pleasant to use. 
§2.00 per bottle. 

Testimonials free. 
W. P. YOUNG, P. D. F., 
Springfield, .Mass. 



For sale by Mack&Co.. Langley &MichaelsCo 
Redington & Co., J. O'Kaoe and J. A. McKerron 
all of San Francisco. 




THE BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

IMPROVED 



(POCKET SIZE) 

100 Pages. Price $1, postpaid. 

Most Complete Book 
of the kind published. 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN, 
36 Geary St.. San Francisco. 



DOC WILLIAMS' 
BOARDING AND TRAINING STABLE 

Elehth Avenue, near Fulton Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

Colts broke and trained to trot and satisfaction 
guaranteed. Terms reasonable. Phone: Pago 1324 



HEALDS 



BUSINESS COLLEGE 



24 Post Street, San Francisco, Cal. 



The oldest, the largest, the most popular com- 
mercial school on the Pacific Coast. 20,000 gradu- 
ates; 80 teaohers; 70 typewriters; over 300 students 
annually plaoed in positions 



Send for oatalogue. 
P. IIKALD, President. 



Advertisements under this head one cent per word 
per insertion. Cash to accompany order. 



COLI.IKS 



~j\T AGNIFICENTLY BRED PUPPIES AND 

h7 ^.?, r< J wn ». slock - Flve S,U(1 d °S« In service. 
GLEN TANA COLLIE KENNELS. P. O Box 
1907 Spokane, Wash. u- B0X 



ST. BERNARDS. 



AT STUD — CHAMPION LE KING. GRAND- 
est headed St. Bernard on the Coast. Fee ICO 
W. WALLACE, 58 Boyce St., San Francisco. 



IRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS. 



TRISH AND SCOTCH TERRIERS FOR SALE 
x Scottle Puppies sired by Ch. Loyne Ruflian 
and Crimson Rambler. Best Irish stock on the 
Coast. Mrs. BRADLEY-DYNE, Saturna P. O., 
B. C. 



T he Cocker Spaniel 

Its History, Points, 
Standard, Care, 
Training, Etc. 

PRICE, POSTPAID, 50 CENTS 

The instructions on Care, Training, etc., apply 
toother breeds as well as to Cockers, and it is a 
useful bock for the dog owner. Tells how to 
teach them to perform tricks. 

FOR SALE BY THE 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



VETERINARY. 



DR. C. MASOERO 

VETERINARY SURGEON 

Graduate of Royal Veterinary 
College of Turin 

Infirmary and Residbnce— 811 Howard St : 
between Fourth and Fifth Sts., San Francisco 
Telephone: South 456. 



X>r. 'XWxx*., IF". EJgan. 

M. R. C. V. S., F. E. V. M. S. 
VETERINARY SURGEON. 
Member of the Royal College of Veterinary 
Surgeons, England; Fellow of the Edinburg 
Veterinary Medical Society; Graduate of the New 
Veterinary College, Edinburgh; Veterinary Sur- 
geon to the S. F. Fire Department; Live Stock 
Inspeotor forNew Zealand and Australian Colonies 
at the port of San Francisco; Professor of Equine 
Medicine, Veterinary Surgery, Veterinary Depart- 
ment University of California: Ex-President ot 
the California State Veterinary Medical Associa- 
tion; Veterinary Infirmary, Residence and Office. 
San Francisco Veterinary Hospital, 1117 Golden 
Gate Avenue, near Webster St., San Francisco - 
Telephone Park 128. 



BLAKE, M0FFITT & T0WNE 



-DEALERS IN- 



55-57-59-61 First Street, S. F. 
Telephone Main 100 

CALIFORNIA 
Chronic Bronchitis and Catarrh of the Bladder 

Cored In 48 Honrs. 



i 



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CAPSULES 



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Superior to Copaiba, Cubebs or Injection 



PEDIGREES TABULATED 



And type written 
Ready for framing. 
Write for prices. 

Breeder and Sportsman, 36 Geary Stree, 
San Francisco, Oal. 



I February 4, 1905 



TELEPHONE, 

South 640 




VRSE BOOTS 



San Francisco, Cal.^^- 



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Acknowledged by all sports- 
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Can always be enjoyed by com- 
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with the greatest 
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Write for Illustrated Catalogue. 

PACIFIC COAST DEPOT: 
86-88 First Street, 

SAN FRANCISCO. 

E. E. DRAKE, - - Manager. 

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REMINGTON 
SHOT ^^^GUNS 




A revelation in perfect balance and finish, 
killing power and extreme accuracy. 



ft 



^3VE^iTjnvriTioiNr, rifles, shototjkts 

WEBB AWARDED THE 

ONLY GRAND PRIZE. 

BY THE SUPERIOR JURY AT THE ST. LOUIS EXPOSITION, 1904. 



190B. 1903. 1904. 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

won the Professional Championship. 
Mr. Fred Gilbort. 
1903. 1904. 

DuPONT SMOKELESS 

won the Amateur Championship. 
Mr. L. B. Fleming. Mr. John W. Garrett. 
Is It uniform? 



C. P. W. BR ANDS. 

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When ordering from your dealer mention OUR BRANDS 
and kind of Powder wanted. 

We guarantee our loading. 

California Powder Works 

Wells-Fargo Bldg„ 49 Second St. 
SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. 



Don't forget that 

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(Made <n America by Americans) 
combines all the qualities of 

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with 

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LAFLIN * RAND POWDER CO. 



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GUNS 
Gun Goods 

4VSend for Catalogue. 



Bolcher & Go, 

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Tackle 

538 MARKET STREET, S. F. 




You can get these Smokeless Powders in 



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(The $v&eh&c ant* : §p$vi&man 



I February 11, 1905 



$20,800 SALT LAKE CITY on ™ 

150 STALLS WESTERN RACING CIRCUIT 

MAY 30, Purses $1200 

mA " |200 ?§• DECORATION DAY, MAY 30 *5» 

l»i PROGRAM 

JULY 15, 17, 18, 19 8000 « PlirqpNn , **..•'««-•» ifinn S 

(Western Racing Circuit Dates) SR ' NO. I trot & pace 3>0UU *fc 

JULY 24, Purses 1200 & Purse No. 2 ^iTe 400 & 

SEPT. 4, " 1200 I Purse Ho. 3 "^ e K 100 g 

OCT. 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 8000 & Purse No. 4 H rl^ 100 * 

(State Fair iuce 8 ) M 81200.00 & 

$20,800 W^m^mm^m^. 

UTAH RACING ASSOCIATION ADD w"s. jones, 

W. S. JONES, MANAGER. GRAND THEATRE, 

WRITE FOR ENT RY BLANK FOR MAY 3Q Salt lake City. Utah 

Fourth Payment each 

Due and Must Be Paid By 

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 1, 1905 

ON YEARLINGS. 

Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes No. 4, $6000 

Uutranteed by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse Breeders Association. 

For Foals of Mares covered in 1903. To trot or pace at two and three years old. Entries closed 
November 3. I9U3. NOTHING MOKK TO PAY BRFOKE IMS, when your foal can start In the 
Two- Year-Old division. atake« divided as follows: $3250 for Trotting Foals, J1750for Pacing Foals, 
$800 to Nominators of Dams of Winners and $200 for Owners of Stallions. 

A Chance for Those Who Failed to Enter. 

^nh<t ii ll t ion? A ' ew of tDe or 'Kinal nominators of Pacific Breeders Futurity Stakes for foals 
ollUa 111UUUII3. f 1901 have advised us that, because of barrenness of the mare or death of the 

foal, ih's wish to dispose of their entries. If you own one or more whose dams you neglected to name 
when entries closed, send $22. with Color, Sex and Breeding of the Foal, on or before March 1st next, 
which covers payments to March 1.1906, and the few substitlons to be disposed of will be awarded 
in the order in which remittances are received. Prompt attention will secure for you this rich 

engagement. 

E. P. 11 KALI) President. F. W. KELLET, Sec'y, 36 Geary St , S. F. 



CAMPBELL'S 



FOOT REMEDY best** remedy 

EVER USED ON HORSES' FEET. 

IT PENETRATES and DRIES IN Quickly and DOES 
NOT GUM and FILL UP THE PORES like tar and oil 
compounds. It Is the GREATEST REMEDY ever used to 
remove SORENESS and FEVER from the foot, and makes it 
possible to get good services out of a horse working on hard 
and hot pavements 

It gives natural nourishment to the foot and Incites a 
rapid, healthy growth— ALL DRYNESS AND BRITTLE- 
NKSS quickly disappears. 

QUARTER CRACKS and SAND CRACKS are rapidly 
grown out when directions given in our booklet are followed. 

It Is a SURE CURE for CORNS, CONTRACTED FEET 
and NAIL WOUNDS If directions are followed. 

It PRET EXTS SOUND FEET FROM BECOMING UN- 
SOUND and GROWS a TOUGH. STRONG. ELASTIC WALL 
and HEALTHY FROG— A FOOT WHICH WILL STAND 
WORK on race courses. 

Many of the best owners and trainers state that for track 
work nothing equals It. In many cases horses have reduced 
their records several seconds, due to Its use. 

It is a CER'J AIN CURE for THRUSH and SCRATCHES 

We Guarantee That It Will Do What We Claim 
and Will Refund Money If It Falls. 

PRICES:— Quarts, $100; Half-Gallon, $175; Gallon, $3 00. 

2H-Gallon, $5.50; Five-Gallon, $10.00. 

Books giving full directions for its use and much valuable Information as to shoeing are supplied 

free. 

Don't fall to read "ad." giving information concerning Campbell's Iodoform Gall Cure In next 
Issue of this paper. It is the best and because of Its merits is rapidly displacing all others. 

JAS. B. CAHPBELL &CO.. Manufacturers. 412 W.fladison St., CHICAGO, ILL 

Sold bv all Dealers in Harness and Turf Goods. If not in stock ask them to write any Jobber for It 




PALACE HOTEL, SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA. 



TOURISTS and TRAVELERS will, now, with difficulty recognize the famous COURT 
into which for twenty-fl e years carriages have driven. Tht9 space of over a quarter 
of an acre has recently, by the addition of very handsome furniture, rugs, chandeliers 
and tropical plants, been converted Into a lounging room— the FINEST IN THE 

WORLD. 

The EMPIRE PARLOR— the PALM ROOM, furnished In Cerise, with Billiard and 
Pool tables for the ladles— the LOUIS XV PARLOR the LADIES WRITING ROOM 
and numorous other modern improvements, together with the unexcelled Cuisine and the 
Most Convenient Location in the City— all add much to the ever increasing popularity 
of this most famous HOTEL. 



3 



MANHAJJSS 



RED BALL BRAND. 

Positivelv Cures Colic, Scouring and Indigestion. 

C. P. KEBTELL, Manager 



Awarded Gold Meda 
A t Call fornla State 
Fair 1892. 

Every horse owner who 
values his stock should 
constantly have a sup- 
ply of It on hand. It 
|improves and keeps 
stock In the pink of 
condition. 

Manhattan Pood Co 

1853 l.il St., San Francisco 

Ask your grocers or dealers for It. 



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Pedigrees 



Tabulated 



OF 



Standard Bred 



AND 



California Trotting Bred 
HORSES 

Giving 1 Performances of the Get 
of Sires and Dams, etc. 



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Tabulated and Typewritten at Reasonable Rates :::: 

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STALLION 

CARDS 

Posters, Folders, etc 

(WITH OR WITHOUT ILLUSTRATIONS) 

Compiled and Printed 
at Reasonable Rates 



Every Facility for Tracing 
Pedigrees and Performances 

Neat and Artistic Work 



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Breeder and Snortsman 

36 GEARY STREET 

SAN FRANCISCO 



February 11, 1905] 



s 



THE WEEKLY 

BREEDER AND SPORTSMAN 

F. W. KELLEY, PROPRIETOR. 



Turf and Sporting Authority of the Pacific oast. 

— OFFICE — 

36 GEARY STREET, SAN FRANCISCO. 

P. O. BOX 2300. 
telephone: Black 586. 



Terms— One Year S3, Six Months »1.7B, Three Months »1 

STRICTLY IN ADVANCE. 

Money snould be sent by postal order, draft or by registered letter 
iddressed to F. W. Keixey, 36 Geary St., San Francisco. Cal. 

Communications must be accompanied by the writer's name and 
address, not necessarily for publication, but as a private guarantee 
of good faith. 



San Francisco, Saturday, February n, 1905. 



STALLIONS ADVERTISED. 



DIABLO 2:09K C. D. Crookham, Woodland 

HAL B. 2:04i4 Omer Van Kirk, University P. O., Los Angeles 

IRAN ALTO 2:I2& H- S. Hogoboom, Woodland 

KINNEY LOU 2:'J7& Budd Doble, San Jose 

MAC DIRECT Capt. C. H. Williams, Palo Alto 

MENDOCINO 2:19'/ 2 Palo Alto Stock Farm 

McKENA 39460 Palo Alto Stock Farm 

MONTEREY 2:09)4 P. J- Williams, San Lorenzo 

NUSHAGAK 25939 Woodland Stock Farm 

PETER Q S. M. Mitchell, Sacramento 

PRINCE ANSEL (2) 2:2014 .Woodland Stock Farm 

STAM B 2:llM Little Bros., Rocklin 

STRATHWAY 2:19 James Thompson, Pleasanton 

ZOLOCK 2:09^ Henry Delaney, University P. O., Cal 

ZOMBRO 2:11 Geo. T. Beckers, University, Cal 



WOODLAND STOCK FARM presents the ad ver- 
tisements of its two stallions Nushagak and 
Prince Ansel in our business columns this week and 
the statements therein made, which are true in every 
particular, tell the facts about these two stallions 
more concisely and better than can bo told in the 
average newspaper article. The picture of Nushagak 
which appears on our front page this issue is an excel- 
lent likeness of this young sire whose get are becom- 
ing very popular with breeders who desire race- 
horse qualities in their colts. Mr. Alex Brown who 
purchased the Woodland race track last year and has 
established thereon the Woodland Stoc<c Farm, is 
one of the leading harness horse breeders of California 
and an enterprising and progressive citizen who has 
already made many improvements on bis new prop, 
erty and will make many more. One of the big meet- 
ings on the circuit will be held at the Woodland track 
this year and visitors will have a chance to see for 
themselves what a splendid breeding farm Mr. Brown 
has established near the shire town of Yolo county. 



yHE PROOF POSITIVE that horse values so far 
as the light harness breed is concerned, are not 
falling off any, is the record of the Fasig-Tipton Mid- 
winter sab which closed at New York last BMday. 
More than a quarter of a million dollars was realized 
from the Ave days' sale. In all 576 head of horseB 
was disposed of, bringing a grand total of $254,560. 
This exceeds in value all previous midwinter sales, the 
best former midwinter sale beiDg the one in 1902> 
when $222,255 was realized. The avtrage price per 
head during the recent sale was £442. The chief at- 
traction of the sale was the big consignment from 
Village Farm, the greatest breeding farm ever estab- 
lished and which has now become a thing of the past' 
owing to the extreme old age and disability of its 
founder, Mr. Cicero Hamlin, who is without doubt 
the most successful of all trotting horse breeders. 
The 153 trott'ng bred horses consigned by this farm 
to the sale brought a total of $127,660, an average of 
$834.39 per head. 



A PROGRAM of the purses and races to be offered 
*» this year by the Pacific Coast Trotting Horse 
Breeders Association for its regular meeting is being 
prepared and will be published soon. If it is necessary 
to complete the California circuit, the Breeders Asso- 
ciation will give an extra meeting as it did last year, 
but it is to be hoped that there will be local meetings 
sufficient to make a circuit of racing without this. 
Pleasanton will give a good meeting and Santa Rosa 
and Woodland will be in line. This with the Breeders 
meeting will give four weeks of racing for good purses 
and the probability is that three or four additional 
towns will come in the circuit. If the State Agri- 
cultur tl Society gets its appropriation from the Legis- 
lature it will hold a fair and race meeting, but other- 
wise some arrangements will have to be made to trot 
the Occident and Stanford Stakes o' 1905 elsewhere. 



Among the bunch of Axworthy youngstors that 
Millard Sanders has at Memphis is mentioned Bale 
Axworthy, who is out of the dam of Laurel's (2.13), 
etc., that can step to beat the band. Another lively 
youngster by Axworthy is the one out of Octavia 
(2.18J), the well-known Baron Wilkes mare that 
raced around here a number of years past. This one 
is a filly and is called Octavia Worthy. She has been 
nice-named Dromey Worthy from the fact that she 
has a back that somewhat resembles a camel's back_ 
Some one was poking fun at her when Millard Sand- 
ers remarked that she was likely to make some of 
them hump when shegot to the races. — Horse Breeder. 



The boarding, training and handling stable which 
J. W. Zibbell & Son have recently opened on 11th 
avenue, near the Chutes, is being well patronizod 
Messrs. Zibbell desiro to purchase several good 
prospects for the circuit this year. They want pro- 
spective 2:15 trotters and 2:10 pacerp, and will pay 
reasonablelprices for horses that fill the bill. 



Answers to Correspondents. 

A 1 

ly. A. Cummings, Walnut Creek— Sidney 2:19i| had 
up'to the close of the year 1904, sixty-one trotters and 
forty-three pacers with records of 2:30 or better. 
Altamont, wagon record 2:26}. has thirty-four trotters 
and twenty pacers with standard records. 

William Clark, Medford, Oregon— Princess Dex> 
ter, registered page 679, volume 13, American Trot- 
ting Register, is by Dexter Prince 11363, dam Wilkes 
Queen by Mambrino Wilkes 6083, second dam Lady 
Stone by David Hill 857, third dam Madame by Jack 
Hawkins. Princess Dexter was bred by L D. Wake- 
field of Lodi, Cal., and sold with her dam, to the late 
Dr. H. Latham of Oakland. Princess Dexter was sold 
by.Dr. Latham prior to 1895, to Thos. S. Harrison of 
Polnfret, Conn. We do not know whether Mr. Harri. 
■ on still owns her, nor who owns Wilkes Queen. If 
living the latter is twenty-four years old. 

Constant Reader, Sacramento— No one can 
advise you intelligently without seeing your colt. A 
long distance diagnosis of any ca6e is of little value. 
Better pay somo reputable trainer to handle the colt 
for a while if you do not know why he is n ot good 
giited. 

J. J. McGrath, Marysville— Consult your local 
merchant in regard to buying a Babcock tester. They 
cost all the way from $5 up. Any person of average 
intelligence can use them. 



The two members of the Gentleman's Driving Club 
of Cleveland, H. K. Devereux and C. K. G. Billings, 
have fallen so deeply in love with trotting to saddle 
that this branch of the sport will be a feature of the 
matinee racing at Cleveland next summer, says an ex- 
change. At a recent meeting of the club these men 
set forth the healthful and pleasurable ad vantage of 
riding trotters so strongly that it is reported that 
twenty members pledged themselves to secure a fast 
trotter to be used in saddle races. The horses will be 
turned over to the club and will be trained and kept 
in condition for racing. Saddlo races will appear on 
each matinee program, and such members as desire 
to ride in them will draw for horses, the drawing to 
be confined to the twenty horses to be purchased for 
the saddle racing. There is no doubt but that this 
movement on the part of the Cleveland amateurs will 
do much to make saddle trotting popular, in an ama- 
teur sense, but it will probably not have much effect 
in the professional field 

Seventeen of the new standard performers of 1904 
were out of Nutwood mares, a greater number than 
are credited to the daughters of any otl or stallion. 
The Nutwood cross is a valuable one and as the years 
go by it is becoming more and more valuable. Nut- 
wood's grand-dam was the thoroughbred mare, Sally 
Russell by Boston and delvers into statistics have 
faund that thoroughbred mares have founded some of 
our best trotting and paciig families. 

Among the nominations on which second pay m< nt 
was made on tho 1st of February was the mare Al» 
gretta owned by Mr. C. F. White of CosmopolU, 
Wash. This mare is a full sister to Chainshot 2:06J 
being by Red Heart out of Pique, dam of four in the 
list. Algretta is now at Walnut Hill Farm in Ken- 
tucky, where she was bred to Moko last year and Is 
with foal. 

Revolutionary riots and enormous expenditures to 
carry on the war with Japan are reported to havo 
caused the abandonment of harness racing in Russia. 
Several wtll known American trainers will be sufferers 
if tho rumors are true. Frank Starr and Frank Caton 
are among- tho prominent Yankee drivers under en- 
gagement in iho land of the Tsar. 

The Eastern Associations aro'all claiming dates for 
harness meetings, and they occupy a half pa^ge in the 
last Issuo of theChicagc Horseman. The North Pacific 
Circuit has fixed its dates, but California has thus far 
claimed no dates. Isn't it time that a date or tv 
was boing claimed in this State? 

John Payne's Enoch 2:1 2 J defeated A. J. McClure's 
Prince A. 2:12} in a match on the Ice at Albany a fow 
days ago. Enoch is by Sid moor and was formorly 
owned by the Meek Estate. 

"Save-the-Horse," is doubtless the most popular 
veterinary remedy ever introduced in this State- 
Many owners say it does everything that is promised. 

E. E. Smathors was married week before last and 
left New York bound for Europe on his wedding tour. 

The racing men ought to try the Hart Apartments 
this winter; 3 and 4 rooms private baths, te'epbone, 
steam heat, first class. 750 Ellis street. *tf 



THE AMERICAN THOROUGHBRED, Capt. Tom 
Merry's book, is out, and we acknowledge receipt 
of a copy. No writer on thoroughbred topics has 
had so many readers during the past thirty years as 
' Hidalgo," (Capt. Merry's nom-de-plume), and the 
bare statement of the fact that he has compiled and 
published a work in his 70th year that contains mat- 
ter that he has not heretofore given to the public, 
written in that entertaining conversational style 
that has nude him so popular, should induce levery 
person interested in the breeding of the thoroughbred 
horse to secure a copy at once. As the author says in 
his preface, "the book is written for the perusal of 
plain men; it deals with plain and stubborn 
facts; and for that reason is couched in 
the plainest language possible." And this is 
what makes the work valuable and will doubt- 
less lead to a large sale. It contains chapters 
on the origin of the thoroughbred, the three cardinal 
lines of Herod, Matchem and Eclipse, the British, the 
American, the Austro-Hungarian.and the Australian 
thoroughbreds. There arechapters also on the Bruce 
Lowe figure system of breeding, converse in-breeding, 
two-year old racing, selling races, spurious pedigrees, 
and a heart-to-heart talk with breeders that should 
be read by every owner of a thoroughbred mare, and 
which is worth the price of the whole book. Capt. 
Merry is a man of original ideas. As a student of 
thoroughbred breeding for the past forty jears, l.e 
has heard all sorts of theories and witnessed all sorts 
of experiments. He has been a close observer and 
being one of those broad-minded men who can follow 
truth where'er it leads, is now able to "sift the grain 
from the chaff" and "hold fast to that which is good." 
No man of his years has a brighter or more active 
mind, and this last work of his ever busy pen is its 
best. The book is handsomely printed and bound, 
and is for sale at $5 per copy. 



THE twenty-second report of the Agricultural Ex- 
^ periment Station of the University of California 
has been received It contains interesting reports 
from all the staff of the Experiment Station, which 
are most interesting. 



THE Kentucky Farmer and Breeder has come out 
in an improved and enlarged form, and presents 
a very fine appearance. 



North Pacific Fair Circuit Dates. 

Lewisand Clark horseshow, Portland .Aug. 28-Sept. 8 

Oregon state fair./ Sept. 11 to 16 

Lewis and Clark cattle, sheep goat and 

swine show, Portland Sept. 19 to 29 

Everett fair Sept 18 to 23 

Seattle Sept. 25 to 3 

Victoria fair Sept. 26 to 30 

Washington statefair Oct. 2 to 7 

Spokane fair Oct. 9 to 14 

Lewiston fair Oct. 16 to 21 



Talking about hor e values, here is evidence that 
they are pretty good in California at the present time. 
Mr. Jerry Doran, the well known hay, grain and coal 
deale", whose place of business is at the corner of 
Market street and San Pablo avenue in Oakland, 
wants to trade a quarter section of land for a good 
young horse. This 160 acres is rolling land, situated 
on a good county road, nine miles from the railroad 
station of San Miguel in Monterey county. He ex- 
pects to harvest two tons of hay to tho acre from 125 
acres of It this season and the land is probably worth 
$2000. Mr. Doran says he naturally wants to get a 
good horse for this land, and that he prefers a well 
bred McKinney. There are no improvements on the 
land, not even a fence, but the most of it is tillable. 



Che &yccosv axxb gpovtamaxi 



[February 11, 1905 




Oae day in December, 1885, while living in my 
native town in Ashtabula county.. Ohio, I met "Jim"' 
Herrick, a neighbor and boyhood friend, and we at 
once started a conversation on our favorite subject, 
"horse." "Jim" was a big boy and I was a little boy, 
and I had always looked upon him as a leading 
authority on horses. When he grew to manhood he 
developed into a pretty shifty all-round horseman 
and about the slickest trader I ever knew. I did not 
know much about horses myself except their pedi- 
grees, and I had them down "pat." 

At the time I am writing about I had the history, 
breeding and performance of every noted trotting or 
pacing horse, sire or dam in America "on tap,"from 
imp Messenger down, and was ready to "spread" it 
at the slightest provocation. I had a great reverence 
for the wonderful sire Blue Bull "5, the horse that 
was then the champion sire of the world, and when 
"Jim" told me that day that he knew of a son of the 
old horse that was for sale I got intensely interested. 

The horse that he referred to was owned by Sidney 
Love & Son, of Mecca, Trumbull county, Ohio. I had 
never seen him, but immediately made up my mind 
that I would the very next day. Upon arising next 
morning, I found that much snow had fallen during 
the night, that it was still blowing and snowing and 
that my proposed trip would be anything but a pleas- 
ure ride. Nevertheless, I hitched up and started for 
Mecca, fifteen miles distant, as I was impatient to see 
the son of the once-despised plebian pacer who had 
surpassed the aristocratic and popular Rysdyk's 
Hambletonian as a sire of trotters. I made slow 
progress through the snow drifts till I had gone 
about three miles, when I realized that it would be 
impossible for me to reach my destination and return 
the same day, so I turned around and went back 
home, postponing my trip till the roads got in better 
shape. A few days later I started under more favor- 
able conditions, saw the horse, liked him, and traded 
for him and he was delivered to me next day. At 
that time he was about twelve or fourteen years old, 
had been used as a "cross roads stud" serving a cheap 
lot of common farm mares at a very low fee, and none 
of his colts had ever been trained. His pedigree as 
given me was as follows: Sired by Blue Bull 75, first 
dam by Tom Hal 3000, second dam by Bertrand, 
thoroughbred, and bred by Francis Cline, of Rush- 
ville, Ind., a neighbor of James Wilton, owner of old 
Blue Bull. He was a beautiful dark chestnut about 
15.3; strip in the face; both hind ankle9 white; round 
closely-ribbed body; strong back; smooth, finely- 
turned rump and powerful quarters; with the best of 
feet and legs absolutely sound ; small ears; large, full, 
mildly expressive hazel eyes; head, a trifle large and 
slightly beefy about the jowls, well set on a strong, 
beautifully crested neck of good length; mane and 
tail not heavy but fine as silk, and coat like satin 
summer and winter. The hair on his fetlocks no 
longer than on his back. Never trained for speed, he 
had a fine open trotting gait, never showing any in- 
clination to pace; had the sweetest disposition and 
most intelligence of any stallion I ever knew. 

In the early eighties there moved from Indiana to 
north-eastern Ohio, a man by the name of Wolfe who 
purchased a tract of land in the norih-eastern part of 
Trumbull County with the view of starting a stock 
farm. He brought with him several mares, among 
them a mare called Punch, full sister to Ella Willson, 
2:30 by Blue Bull 75. After he had been in Ohio a 
short time he heard of "Love's Blue Bull" as Blue 
Boy was then commonly known. After seeing the 
horse, he sent his Blue Bull mare to be bred to him. 
Before the mire foaled, Mr. Wolfe caught the gland- 
ers from au infected bronco and died. His widow 
settled up his estate and the stock was all sold at 
public auction. As there was no one who knew their 
breeding they were nold without their pedigrees be- 
ing-given, and had it not been that the Blue Bull 
mare had been bred to Blue Boy and her name and 
pedigree given, her identity would have been lost. She 
was bought by a carpenter living in Bloomfield, 
Trumbull Co , whose namj I have forgotten When 
her filly by Blue Boy was two years old, he sold 
her to a young r in living in the same town 
(whose name I have also forgotten). She was 3 years 
old in 1886 when J Br6t saw her and as I owned her 
sire and because she was such a fine filly and inbred to 
the greatest sire of trotters in tha world, I was very 
anxious to own her. I had more horses than money 
and offered to trade a handsome young mare worth 
more than $300 for her even up, but her owner wanted 
boot. Not long after a friend of mind named Smith 
and I drove a cheap scrub mare over to Bloomfield 
and gave her and fifty dollars to boot for the filly I 



afterwards called Blue Bell. The young man got the 
boot and I guess thought he had made a good trade 
as horses all looked alike to him. He knew nothing 
of the filly's breeding and I don't suppose he even 
knew that horses had such a thing as a pedigree. 

This filly was a beautiful thing at that time, a 
bright bay, no white, about 15 hand*, stout and well 
made in every respect with a lot of finish. She looked 
like a pacer and was a pacer of the purest kind and 
had she been developed, she would without a doubt, 
have acquired a very fast record. I worked her a 
a little as a four-year-old and she could fly. I had 
long had a desire to come to California. I wanted to see 
the far-famed Palo Alto Stock Farm, the home of the 
great Electioneer and his record breaking sons and 
daughters that were then electrifying the world with 
their wonderful speed. I wanted to know how they 
were developed, so in the early part of 1888 I came to 
California and in course of time, became connected 
with the home of tho Electioneers and had tho pleas- 
ure of handling and training jiany future trotting 
stars bred in that once famous nursery of early 
speed. 

The years rolled by. I read in the papers about the 
fast and game pacing mare called Fanny Dillard and 
also a sensational pacing stallion named Hal B. The 
latter raced consistently two or three years on the 
half-mile tracks in northern Ohio and eastern Penn- 
sylvania and in 1899 swept through the Grand Circuit 
without losing a race, winning nearly $15,000 and a 
record of 2:04*. In 1903 his full sister, Fanny Dillard, 
acquired the world's race record for pacing mares 
2:03J. These two great pacers were sired by Hal Dil- 
lard 2:04?, the great son of Brown Hal 2:12J, and their 
dam is the inbred Blue Bull mare now known as Ellen 
M., that I used to call Blue Bell. 

Hal B. is in California making the season till May 
15 at Los Angeles. He is one of the best race horses 
ever foaled ; is the fastest pacing bred stallion and 
with one exception the fastest stallion that ever stood 
in California. He is the best representative of the 
great pacing race horse Hal family west of the Mis- 
sissippi river. In his veins flow three crosses of the 
Hal blood and his dam is a double grandaughter of 
the greatest sire, all things considered, that ever 
lived, Blue Bull 75. A fast pacer in his day when 
pacers were unpopular, for years a teaser to a jack in 
a mule raising community, serving mares occasionally 
for $5 or nothing, under the most adverse conditions 
imaginable, by sheer merit and individual greatness 
that would not down, Blue Bull forced his way to tho 
front till he became the champion sire of the world. 
It was not till he was ready to die that he was con- 
sidered worthy to serve a well bred mare, consequently 
about 50 of his 60 trotters and 8 pacers were out of 
mares of unknown breeding, or not known to carry 
any trotting blood. All of their records were made 
in races. Not one dollar was ever spent bv anyone in 
developing tbe get of that wonderful horse for the 
purpose of making a reputation for him as a sire. 
What would have been the fato of McKinney, Elec- 
tioneer, Nutwood or any other great sire if they had 
occup'ed the position held by the "Hero of Flat 
Rock." In my opinion, great as they are and where, 
they would never have been heard of. It is through 
his daughters ihat his power to produce speed has 
been transmited. A few years ago ho gained the dis- 
tinction of being the greatest broodmare sire and to- 
day is near the top in that respect, not only in the 
2:30 list but also the 2:15 and 2:10 list. Only three 
sires excel him in each of these faster classes. The 
breeders of California now have an opportunity of 
sjcuring a most valuable out cross by sending their 
mares to the great Hal — Blue Bull stallion now at Los 
Angeles and I believe many of them will appreciate 
and improve the golden opportunity of securing the 
blood that was first to cross the two minute line and 
the blood ihat was strong enough to rise out of the 
lowest depths and gain the crown of the champion 
sire of his day. C. C. C. 

Palo Alto Stallions. 

Although the great Palo Alto Stock Farm is a thing 
of the past so far as breeding for the market is con- 
cerned, there remains there two stallions and they 
will stand for public service, this year. The two 
stallions are Mendocino 2:194 as a three-year-old, by 
Electioneer, and McKena 39.460 by McKinney. 

Mendocino as is well-known to nearly all California 
breeders, is one of Electioneer's youngest and best 
sons. As a young trotter he was most promising, 
trotting to a three-year-old record of 2:194 and work- 
ing miles below that by several seconds. A Bevere 
case of distemper stopped his training, however, and 
and left him so scarred that his sale was out of the 
question. He was leased to the late John Boggs of 
Colusa for a time and served a few outside mares 
while in Colusa County. He was returned to Palo Alto 
and when Idolita 2:09} or Monte Carlo 2:07} acquired 



fame, his reputation as a sire was so well established 
that his services were in demand. It has been said 
that Mendocino is more like his sire than any other 
son of that great progenitor of speed. His foals are 
all of good size, are fine lookers with bold and pure- 
trotting gaits. In Idolita 2:09} he sired a great race 
trotter, and a horse that is destined to be a great sire. 
In Monte Carlo 2:07} he got one of the best Grand 
Circuit trotters ever campaigned. Monte Carlo 
holds the record, 2:07} for the fastest seventh heat 
ever trotted and is the winner of the fastest seven 
heat race. Mendocino's dam is the great brood mare 
Mano by Piedmont, second dam Mamie also a great 
brood mare by Hambletomain Jr , third dam, the 
thoroughbred mare Gilda by imported Mango. The 
get of Mendocino are noted for being universally 
strong, healthy and vigorous, with excellent consti- 
tutions. 

McKena 39460 is a son of the great McKinney, out 
of that very fast trotting mare Helena 2:11} (that has 
produced Wild Nutling 2:11}, Dobbel 2:22 and Hyita 
trial 2:12 1 by Electioneer, second dam the great brood 
mare Lady Ellen, dam of six in the list, by Carr's 
Mambrino, sire of the dam of Sweet Marie 2:04}, third 
dam by Owen Dale and fourth dam by Williamson's 
Belmont. McKena is over sixteen hands high and 
weighs 1350 pounds. He will be five years old in April. 

McKena was bred to fifteen mares last year and 
fourteen of them are in foal. He is one of the grandest 
looking McKinneys ever foaled and a better bred one 
would be very hard to find. As his service fee will be 
only $35 he should receive a very large patronage. 



Stam B. 2:11 1-4 at Pleasanton. 

A fast record, good looks, choice breeding, 5ne 
style, good action and gameness are qualities found in 
Stam B. 2:11}, who was not only one of the best colt 
trotters ever bred in Colifornia, but one of the fastest 
and gamest of race horses, and a stallion that is mak- 
ing a record as a sire that is bound to place him in the 
verv front rank. Stam B.'s record as a race horse is 
known to all Californians. He raced against the very 
best on the Coast and beat nearly ever horse that 
beat him. His record of 2:11} is not within five sec- 
onds of his capabilities had he continued to be raced. 
His sire Stamboul was the fastest trotting stallion of 
his day. His dam Belle Medium had a trotting rec- 
ord of 2:20 and in addition to producing Stam B. 
2:11}, produced Dictatus Medium, a producing stallion 
that has made an authenticated trial of 2:11, and also 
of A jalon, another pi oducing sire. Belle Medium is 
by Happy Medium, sire of Nancy Hanks 2:04 and also 
grandsire of the dam Lou Dillion 1:584. The second 
dam of Stam B. is by Almont Lightning, sire of Zam- 
bro's dam, the next dam is by Mambrino Patchen and 
the next bj Mambrino Chief. So far as breeding is 
concerned, there is no better bred stallion than 
Stam B. 

In the stud Stam B. has not had the best of oppor. 
tunities a9 it is only in the last two or three years that 
he has made any but the most limited seasons. 
Very few of his get have been trained, but from them 
have come Swift B. three-year-old record 2:16}, one of 
the best young prospects in America, and Roxine 
2:18} a mare that is said to be a candidate for 2:10 
honors this year. There are a half dosen young 
Stam B.'s that will take records this year if trained, 
If you want blood that will breed on, foals that will 
have good size, good looks and good feet and lefcSi 
sand your mares to Stam B. 2:11}. He will be at 
Pleasanton this year for the season beginning Febru- 
ary 15th, in charge of Mr. C. H. Gemmill. He is still 
owned by Tuttle Bros, of Rocklin, Cal., who will be 
pleased to answer any inquiries as to breeding mares 
to Stam B. See advertisement. 



The Draft Horse. 

It is the prevailing opinion that the heavy draft 
horse, including the Norman breed, now a distinct 
type, was originally bred for strength to pull heavy 
loads; or as a draft horse. This, however, is amis- 
take. During the so-called Holy Crusades, when the 
cavaliers were making pilgrimages to Jerusalem to 
redeem the Holy City to the followers of The Cross, a 
knight in steei-clad armor, including the breast shield 
and accoutrements of his horse, weighed from 350 to 
450 pounds. In case of the more robust knights, who 
usually weighed in the )5th century about i.00 pounds, 
the war horse was required to carry about 425 pounds, 
So that in the so-called chivalrlc age all breeding was 
directed towards increasing the size and strength of 
the horse. During the year 1217, one hundred stal- 
lions were purchased in Normandy and imported to 
England and bred to English mares. And fo»- three 
centuries after that, size was sought rather than 
speed, principally for the business of war. When 
gunpowder and firearms came to make still more 
deadly the cruel business of war (13th century) there 
was no further use for the lance or steel-clad armor or 
the broad sword, or the ponderoui war steed, and tbe 
horse passed over to a beast of burden.— American 
Sportsman. 



February 11, 1905J 



t&iie gveefrev imfc Sportsman 



5 




Direct Hal 2:04} by Direct, $11,000. 



Lord Direct, four-year-old, by Direct Hal, $10,500. 



Prince Ideal, four-year-old, by The Beau Ideal, 
$10,000. 



The Beau Ideal 2:15J by Dare Devil 2:09 out of dam 
of The Abbot 2:03}, $6000. 



Prince Favorite, four-year-old, by The Beau Ideal, 
dam Princess Chimes by Chimes, $2500. 



Chimes, brown horse, 21 years old, by Electioneer, 
dam Beautiful Bells (dam of 11 in the list), $2350. 



The above were the leading prices of the stallions 
consigned by Village Farm to the Midwinter Sale. 



Of the mares, Nettie King 2:20} (dam of The Abbot) 
brought the highest price, $3000; Lady of the Manor 
2:04}, $2200; Grace Hamlin, $2100; Queen Regent, 
$2000; Fantasy 2:06, $2000; and The Queen 2:10}', 
$2000. 

Lady Fair 2:17 J by Gossiper was one of the trotters 
consigned to the recent Fasig-Tipton sale in New 
York She brought $485 and goes to Good Spring 
Stock Farm, Barre, Pa., where she is to be used as a 
broodmare. 

Carriage horses of the fashionable type must be 
extremely scarce in the breeding districts. Lehman 
Strauss recently traveled two weeks in Ohio without 
find'ng more than five good enough for the New 
Y market. He is now looking through Maine. 



John Madden, Enoch Wishard, Matt Allen, Julius 
Bauer, Crit Davis, Walter House, John Croker, 
Father Bill Daly, W. H. Snyder, Lyle Simmons, Gil 
Curr ,Will Young, Charley Hughes were identified 
with the harness horse game. They are now with the 
runners. 

Fourth payment of $10 is due and must be paid by 
Wednesday, March 1st, on yearlings that are entered 
in Pacific Breeders Futurity No. 4, $6000 guaranteed. 
After this payment is made there will be nothing more 
to pay until 1906. Keep your entry good by making 
this payment. 

The American Horse Breeder, of Boston, announces 
a $10,000 futurity for mares bred last year. It might 
be well for some of our California breeders who con- 
template racing over East in the future, or selling 
their coits at eastern auction sales, to make a few 
entries in this rich stake. 



Delia McCarty, the McKinney mare recently sold 
by Jerry Doran of Oakland to Geo. Easterbrook of 
Den ver, is quite a trotter and should drop into Mc 
Kinney 's already extensive 2:15 list this year. She 
will be trained by Joe Maguire. It is understood that 
$1500 was the price paid for her. 



When booking your mares this year just remember 
that Mr. P. J. Williams fast trotter Monterey 2:09} 
by the great Sydney is in the stud at the low price of 
$50. Monterey sired the fastest four-year-old of 1905, 
the pacer Irish 2:08} and there are several of his colts 
ready to enter the charmed circle this year. 



The table of World's Records, trotting and pacing, 
which Arthur Caton Thomas has compiled for the 
American Horse Breeder is the handiest and most 
complete thing of its kind ever devised, and will be a 
valuable thing for compilers of pedigrees as well as all 
who desire to know what the best records are. 



Owners of mares in Southern. California are booking 
liberally to Neernut 2:12} this year. They remember 
the matinee race at Los Angeles on Christmas Day 
1902, when Neernut 2:12} defeated Sweet Marie in 
2:15. McKinney mares should produce well by Neer- 
nut, and we understand quite a number will be booked 
to him this year. 

The class of mares that are being booked to Kinney 
Lou 2:072 this year are a very high-class lot. The 
fact that the young foais by Budd Doble's great 
trotter are such fine individuals and promising trot- 
ters has influenced those who have bred mares to him 
heretofore to breed them back and Kinney Lou will 
make a good season. 

Among the mares already booked to Hal B. 2:04 J 
since his arrival at Los Angeles is Juliet D. 2:13$ by 
McKinney 2:11}. Juliet D is a pacer and is the dam 
of that whirlwind Irish 2:084 by Monterey 2:09}. A 
fast pacing mare by Bay Wilkes and a four-year-old 
mare by Silkwood 2:07 are also among the mares 
recently booked to Hal B. 



Salt Lake City is on the Western Racing Circuit 
and the Utah Racing Association there has hung up 
$20,800 for the horses to compete for this year at the 
different meetings. Races will be held May 30th, 
July 4th, July 24th and September 4th, one day each. 
The regular circuit meeting will take place July 15th 
to 19th inclusive, and the Utah State Fair will be held 
October 3d to 17th. We advise horsemen who con- 
template racing In that country this year to read the 
ad vertisement that appears in this issue and send to 
W. S. Jones, the manager, for an entry blank contain- 
ing conditions and all particulars. 



Village Farm's horses brought $132,015 at the clos- 
ing out sale held in New York last week. 



Dan Leiginger, 801 Devisadero street, has a high 
bred McKinney gelding for 6ale. See ad vertisement. 



It is rumored about Pleasanton that W. A. Clark, 
J r., will be interested in the proposed new track at 
that place. 

The yearling colt by Axworthy (3), 2:15}, dam the 
former champion trotter Sunol 2:08}, has been named 
Bon Axworthy. 

Nancy Hanks 2:04 has been booked to John A. Mc- 
Kerron 2 - 04$. There will be more speed inheritance 
in the foal than in any ti otter bred thus far. 



Funston 2:08}, the road gelding by Dictatus, sold for 
$1000 at the Fasig-Tipton Midwinter sale. He is now 
the property of John Jones, New York City. 



Prof. Thos. F. Adkin, of Rochester, N. Y , has sent 
Liska 2:18}, dam of Lisonjero 2:08}, Lunda 2:18, Liso 
2:20} and Princess Lesa 2:22} to Ketcham Farm to be 
bred toCresceus 2:02}. 



Metallas 2:11, the fast but disappointing trotter, 
sold for $2500 at the Fasig-Tipton sale. He is a black 
stallion by Mambrino King, out of Metella by Almont, 
and is a grand individual. 

Jack Wilkes, 2:21}, the crack Cleveland matinee 
trotter that trotted two heats in a race last season, to 
wagon, in 2:10, is to be raced on the Grand Circuit by 
Vance Nuckols next summer. 



If you want to win someof the $6000 which the foals, 
now yearlings, entered in Breeders Futurity No. 4 
will contest for in 1906 and 1907, make the payment of 
$10 which is due and must be paid by the 1st of March. 



There were thirty descendants in the maternal line 
from Estabella, the great broodmare, disposed of at 
the Village Farm dispersal, and they brought a total 
of $46,050, an average of $1535. This is a great show- 
ing as quite a number were only babies, while a few 
were well along in years. 



H. S. Hogoboon reports that there is much inquiry 
about Iran Alto 2:12}, James W. Rea's good trotting 
stallion that he basin the stud at the Woodland track 
and the prospects for a good season are excellent. 
The Iran Alto's are all showing speed and extreme 
speed at that. Five two-year-olds by bim that were 
trained a little last year worked miles better than 
2:30. 

Algoneta 2:14, the bay mare by Eros, formerly 
owned by Mr. J. E. Mulcahey, of this city, and sold 
by him in New York two years ago, where she has 
been one of the champion trotting team of the New 
York speedway, went through the Midwinter sale, 
last week, and only brought $350. She has seen her 
best days. Mattie Lynn Holt, her mate, sold for 
$1000 at the same sale. 



Pleasanton people are talking of a matinee on 
Washington Birthday, this month. The date falls on 
Wednesday, and as the owners of roadsters are al- 
ready at work training for the events some good 
racing will undoubtedly be seen. The Pleasanton 
Times says the following named gentlemen will 
probably start their horses in some of the races that 
day: Dr. Colestock, George Johnston, W. E. Deteis. 
C. L. Powell, R. C. Peach, L. M. Lock, Con Nevin 
and Lee Wells. 

Cavel Rodriguez will move from Gonzales to Salinas 
track next week with quite a string of trotters and 
pacers owned by different parties. He will take the 
four-year-old Joe Robin -by Robin that paced a mile 
last year in 2:19$, and a full brother called Fred W. 
that is a very promising three-year-old. Another 
good three-year-old is called Chris Robin. All three 
of these young horses are owned by Mr. C. H. Wide- 
man, of Gonzale3. Rodriguez will also have in his 
string the two-year-old trotter Red Robin, owned by 
Paul Bianchi of Gonzales. It is the intention to fit all 
these youngsters for races on the California Circuit. 



While the heavy rains of the past few weeks have 
made nearly every track in California unfit to work 
on, the Woodland track has been in such shape that 
the horses have been taking their usual exercise on it 
whenever the sun has shone. Since Superintendent 
Chas. Spencer began working it it is surprising how 
soon after a rain it is fit to speed over. There are 
quite a few horses in training there. Al Charvo has 
nine head, H. S. Hogoboom ten, R. H. Nason five, 
Det Bigelow four, C. W. Harrington four, Prof. Free- 
man ten, Peter Fryatt two, Frank Wright five, and 
Chas. Spencer is working fourteen of the Woodland 
Stock Farm horses, mostly colts and fillies by Nusha- 
gak and Prince Ansel. 



The Horse Fair Association will hold a six days' 
exhibition at Madison Square Garden, New York, 
beginning April 24th. At a recent meeting of the 
directors it was decided to offer $10,000 in purses for 
trotting, pacing and pony races under saddle on a 
miniature track to be built in tho arena. On these 
and other features of the >how tho association de- 
cided to expend about $25,000, and 10 this end the 
board of directors was authorizrd to increase tho 
capital stock of the association to $25,000. The officials 
recently elected are as follows: F. M. Ware, President; 
J. D. Carrol, Vice-President; G. G. Gue, Secretary; 
Lehman Strauss, Treasurer; Directors, M. G. Byers, 
Allen MacNaughtan, S. B. Hexter, T. E. Gordon, Jr.; 
J. D. Carrol, F. M. Ware, G. G. Gue, Lehman Strauss 
and Albert De Cernea. 



Two or three bills prohibiting betting on races have 
been introduced in the Legislature but are hung up 
in the Committee on Public Morals, which does not 
seem to be particularly antagonistic to them. The 
author of one of these measures will demand that it 
be taken out of the hands of the committee as be is 
afraid that it will be lost in the shuffle unless he can 
get it before the House. 



There are at least a half dozen buyers in California 
who are looking for good prospects for the Grand 
Circuit. They are willing to pay fair prices, but they 
complain that the figures asked by owners are a little 
too high. Owners should get ail they can, but the 
chance to sell a horse at a good price should not be 
lost through fear that the buyer will re sell at a profit. 
If horse buyers cannot realize something for their 
time and money they will go out of the business. 



The breeding of Zolock 2:09} apprals to all intelli- 
gent breeders. Heis by McKinney 2:11}, the greatest 
of sires, dam the great broodmare Gazelle 2:11}, dam 
also of Zephyr 2:11 by Gossiper 2:14J; second dam 
Gipsey, dam of Gazelle 2:11.} and Ed Winship 2:15 by 
Gen Booth. Zolock is proving a sire of early and ex- 
treme speed as out of his first crop of two-year-olds 
came last year Delilah, the fastest two-year-old pacer 
of the year, and Ambush a 2:20 trotter. No mistake 
will be made by those who breed to Zolock. 



Diablo 2:09} is looking better this year than ever. 
Like nearly every California bred horse that is taken 
out of the State for any length of time, he has picked 
up wonderfully since coming back from Oregon, and 
looks and acts like a two-year-old. The Diablos go 
into the list with such regularity every year that 
breeders can depend upon getting a fast colt when 
breeding any good mare to Diablo. Mr. C. D. Crook- 
ham, who has Diablo at Woodland this year, is book- 
ing quite a number of good mares to him. 



Direct Hal 2:04} sold for $11,000 at the recent Fasig- 
Tipton sale in New York, and one of his sons, Lord 
Direct, sold for $10,500. The coming of Hal B 2:04$ to 
Los Angeles gives California breeders an opportunity 
to secure the blood of the famous Tennessee pacing 
family "The Hals, "and in a great measure enables 
them to duplicate the breeding of this great stallion 
Direct Hal, as he was by Direct 2:05$ and his dam a 
daughter of Tom Hal Direct Hal was bred by that 
great reinsman, Mr. Ed Geers. 



The fact that a whole car of mares will be sent from 
Spokane to Los Angeles to be bred to Zombro 2:11 is 
not surprising. As a sire Zombro is McKinney 's great- 
est son anJ as a race trotter his equal was never seen 
among three-year olds as he won forty heats in actual 
races, in the majority of which he met aged 
horses. The young Zombros win at the races 
and in the show ring. He is one of the grandest 
looking and one of the best bred stallions in America. 
What more could any one ask when selecting a sire to 
breed to? 



Mr. Louis W. Winans of England, who has been a 
heavy purchaser at the big sales, has a string of fast 
pacers that are enough to excite theenvy of American 
road drivers and speed lovers. In his string are 
Prince Alert 1:57 Fanny Dillard 2:03ij, Charley B. 
2:07$, Passing Belle 2:08}, Theron Powers 2:08, Trilby 
Direct 2:08}, Tom Nolan 2:09}, Bobby Hal 2:14} and 
Katy B. 2:14}. He has some pretty fair trotters also, 
and among them are Alta Axworthy 2:10}, Nellie Gay 
2:14} and others. 



Sue 2:12$ by Athadon received a kick from a horse 
running in the pasture with her a few days ago, and 
as a result lost twin foals by Strathway that were not 
due for several weeks. The twins were a colt and 
filly exactly alike in every way, the same size, and 
baya with a small star. Mr. C. A. Canfleld, of Los 
Angeles, the owner of Sue feels the loss greatly, his 
desire was to breed a pair of roadsters from this good 
mare, and no man's $10,000 would have purchased 
these foals had they lived. Sue will be bred to Strath- 
way again this year and it is to be hoped that better 
luck will attend her. 



The popular Dexter Prince Stables, near the corner 
of Baker and Grove streets, this city, situated just at 
the Panhandle entrance to Golden Gate Park, have 
recently passed into the bands of Victor Verilhac, 
proprietor and James McGrath, manager, two gentle- 
men who will devote their time to catering to the 
wants of those who desire to keep their driving horses 
at one of the best located and most sanitary stables In 
California. Mr. Verilhac employs careful and ex- 
perienced men to care for and exercise park roadsters 
and prepare horses for track use. Ladies whe enjoy 
driving in the park or along the ocean shore will find 
the Dexter Prince Stables an ideal place to have their 
horses stabled as they can drive them from the park 
without crossing cartracks. 



Many good rac